James Doubek

Doubek started at NPR as a part-time production assistant in 2015 before joining full time as an associate producer in 2017. He previously was an intern at NPR's Washington Desk in the summer of 2015.

An elite boarding school in Connecticut is acknowledging sexual abuse by seven now-former staffers against 16 students — going back as far as 1969 and lasting until 1992.

The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn., is a private high school of about 600 students.

Updated at 8:36 a.m. ET

Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan died Saturday, the foundation bearing his name confirmed. He was 80.

"Kofi Annan was a global statesman and a deeply committed internationalist who fought throughout his life for a fairer and more peaceful world. During his distinguished career and leadership of the United Nations, he was an ardent champion of peace, sustainable development, human rights and the rule of law," the Kofi Annan Foundation and Annan family said in a statement.

The World Health Organization said Friday that security concerns in the Democratic Republic of the Congo's North Kivu region were preventing aid workers from reaching certain areas — and leaving open the possibility of the Ebola virus spreading.

At least 1,500 people could be exposed to the virus, WHO spokesperson Tarik Jasarevic told reporters in Geneva, according to Reuters.

Former Trump White House staffer Omarosa Manigault Newman released excerpts of a recording on Thursday that she said corroborated her claim of being offered a job paying $15,000 a month in exchange for staying quiet about her time in the administration.

Excerpts of a secret phone recording between Manigault Newman and President Trump's daughter-in-law Lara Trump aired on MSNBC on Thursday.

In a move it said was to address the large cost of entering a career in medicine, New York University's School of Medicine said Thursday that it will offer full scholarships to all current and future students in its doctor of medicine program.

NYU said it was the "only top 10-ranked" medical school in the U.S. to offer such a generous package.

Two women accused of killing Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half brother of North Korea's dictator, will remain in custody after a judge in Malaysia on Thursday said there is enough evidence of a "well-planned conspiracy" to move the case forward.

The Colorado baker who won a Supreme Court case over his refusal to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple is suing state officials, alleging religious discrimination over his refusal to make a cake celebrating a gender transition.

Attorneys for Jack Phillips, who owns Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood, Colo., said Wednesday that the state is "continuing to single out Jack for punishment and to exhibit hostility toward his religious beliefs."

Updated at 10:04 a.m. ET

More than 300 news publications across the country are joining together to defend the role of a free press and denounce President Trump's ongoing attacks on the news media in coordinated editorials publishing Thursday, according to a tally by The Boston Globe.

Updated at 8:56 a.m. ET Sunday

Results from primary elections in Hawaii show Democratic Gov. David Ige likely holding onto his job after a challenge from Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, who currently represents Hawaii's 1st Congressional District.

In other high-profile contests, former congressman Ed Case appeared to be headed back to Washington to represent Hawaii's 1st Congressional District, while Rep. Tulsi Gabbard easily won re-election in the party nomination to represent Hawaii's 2nd Congressional District.

Updated at 8:34 p.m ET Saturday

The man who stole a plane with no one else on board from the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport late Friday has been identified as Richard Russell, 29, according to two unnamed law enforcement sources. He flew the plane for about an hour before crashing into a forest on a nearby island.

Russell was a resident of Pierce County, Wash., and "acted alone," the Pierce County Sheriff's Department tweeted, describing him as "suicidal."

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who leads Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer by a razor-thin initial vote tally in the Republican primary race for governor, said Thursday night that he would recuse himself from the vote-counting process.

Kobach told CNN Thursday night that he would be "happy to recuse" himself and would make a formal announcement Friday.

As of Thursday night Kobach leads Colyer by 121 votes, out of about 311,000 ballots cast in Tuesday's Republican gubernatorial primary, according to an Associated Press count.

The New York City Council passed legislation Wednesday to temporarily halt new licenses of for-hire vehicles like those of Uber and Lyft, in the first action by a major U.S. city to cap the growth of the ride-hailing services.

The city council passed a package of bills to regulate the ride-hailing industry, including setting a one-year cap on the number of Uber and Lyft cars on the streets to study effects on traffic congestion, and allowing city regulators to set a minimum pay rate for drivers.

Three Czech service members with NATO's Resolute Support mission were killed Sunday in eastern Afghanistan by a suicide bomber, the U.S. military and Czech authorities said.

In addition, one American service member and two Afghan soldiers were injured.

They were on foot patrol with Afghan forces, according to NATO.

Amazon says it removed several items of racist propaganda from its store in response to questions from a Democratic lawmaker — though white supremacist literature and other propaganda items remain widely available on the site.

After criticism from advocacy groups and Minnesota Democratic Rep. Keith Ellison about the availability of Nazi-themed toys and baby onesies with pictures of burning crosses on Amazon's website, the company said this week that it had removed several items and banned sellers who had violated its policies.

Pilots with billionaire Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic company climbed to 170,800 feet — about 32.3 miles — and reached 2.47 times the speed of sound Thursday in the third successful rocket-powered flight of the company's newest spacecraft.

Just over four years ago, on July 17, 2014, six delegates on their way to the International AIDS Conference died in the shoot-down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over eastern Ukraine.

The delegates were among the 298 people killed hours after their flight took off from Amsterdam.

International investigations concluded that the missile that downed the jet originated with the Russian military, which has denied involvement.

Haiti's Prime Minister Jack Guy Lafontant resigned Saturday after days of riots sparked by a plan to raise prices on fuel.

Haitian President President Jovenel Moïse said on Twitter that he had accepted Lafontant's resignation as well as members of his cabinet. Moïse said he would work to choose a new prime minister.

Health officials are investigating an outbreak of intestinal illness that has sickened dozens and is "likely linked" to salads at McDonald's.

McDonald's said Friday it's voluntarily pulling salads from about 3,000 locations in 14 states, primarily in the Midwest, until it can switch to a different lettuce supplier.

Editor's note: The embedded video contains language some may find offensive.

Updated at 9:50 p.m. ET Thursday

First Boys Are Rescued From Cave In Thailand

Jul 8, 2018

Updated at 11:14 a.m. ET Sunday

Four members of the trapped soccer team have been rescued from the flooded cave in Thailand where they had been trapped for more than two weeks, according to Thai Navy SEALS.

It's part of an effort to evacuate the 12 boys from the team along with their coach, in a rescue that has captured the world's attention, with reporters flocking to the scene and foreign divers arriving to assist.

Updated at 10:35 a.m. ET

A former diver with an elite Thai navy unit has died while taking part in operations to rescue 12 boys and their soccer coach who have been trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand.

Saman Kunan was returning from an overnight mission placing oxygen canisters when he lost consciousness and died Friday morning, Thai navy SEAL commander Rear Adm. Arpakorn Yookongkaew told reporters Friday. Saman was helping with the rescue mission as a volunteer.

Activists in two separate protests against the Trump administration's immigration policies were arrested at the Statue of Liberty on Wednesday — one group unfurling a banner calling for the abolition of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, while in another act of defiance, a woman climbed the statue's base to protest immigrant family separations.

Nothing says "gentrification" quite like the opening of a Whole Foods.

That's the message, at least, of a new musical about the idea that a location of the largely organic, high-priced grocery chain could one day open in Washington, D.C.'s Anacostia neighborhood.

Anacostia lies east of the Anacostia River in Southeast D.C., in a part of the city that's historically been more impoverished and more heavily African-American than other areas.

The president of South Sudan and his former vice president, who now leads the country's largest rebel group, announced a permanent cease-fire Wednesday following talks in Sudan's capital.

In the latest of many unsuccessful attempts to stem more than four years of bloodshed in South Sudan's civil war, President Salva Kiir and rebel leader Riek Machar's signed agreement is set to take effect on Saturday.

The two leaders met in person for the first time in two years beginning last week during talks in Ethiopia.

The National Park Service has approved an initial request for organizers to hold a second "Unite the Right" rally, this time across the street from the White House in August — one year after white supremacists gathered in Charlottesville, Va.

At least 17 people died in a stampede at a nightclub in Caracas, Venezuela early Saturday morning, Venezuela's interior minister said.

More than 500 young people were inside the club when a tear gas canister went off, Interior Minister Nestor Reverol said on Twitter.

He said eight minors were among the dead and at least five people were injured, three of whom were minors.

An "official oracle" has spoken — or eaten, technically — and predicted victory for Russia.

That was the news from St. Petersburg Wednesday after Achilles the cat picked Russia to win the opening match of the World Cup on Thursday in a game against Saudi Arabia.

In a victory for Amazon, the Seattle City Council voted to repeal a tax on the city's biggest businesses Tuesday, a measure designed to fund efforts to combat Seattle's large homeless population.

In a meeting punctured with shouting from activists, council members voted 7-2 to repeal the so-called "head tax," which would have raised about $47 million per year to fund affordable housing projects and to help the city's homeless population.

A federal judge in New York City has halted, for now, the deportation of a pizza delivery man at least until a hearing on July 20.

Judge Alison J. Nathan of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York ordered Saturday evening for the government to show why a temporary preliminary injunction should not be granted in the case of Pablo Villavicencio Calderon, an Ecuadorean immigrant, according to Villavicencio's lawyers.

The Trump administration's policy of separating families who are detained after illegally crossing the Southern border has become a lightning rod for the White House's critics.

Hundreds of children have already been separated from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy in May — though the practice has been going on for at least several months.

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