Pennsylvania's Legislative Caucuses Are Unregulated, But Should They Be?

Oct 3, 2018

There are hundreds of semi-official government entities in Pennsylvania that use taxpayer money, introduce legislative agendas and work closely with outside interest groups, but these groups are largely unregulated and operate under no obligation to publicize their meetings or answer questions about their memberships.

Winston Choi-Schagrin and Brad Bumsted, reporters at The Caucus, a weekly newspaper covering Pennsylvania politics and government, ask why.

Port Authority of Allegheny County CEO Katharine Kelleman waits outside 90.5 WESA's studios on Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018.
Credit Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

Elsewhere in the show, the Port Authority of Allegheny County provides transit for nearly 200,000 riders every day between 700 buses, 80 light rail vehicles and the two inclines on either end of Mt. Washington. What are they doing to make sure those riders are served effectively? Port Authority CEO Katharine Kelleman, who joined the authority earlier this year, explains how the city’s public transportation is evolving.

And in part three of Keystone Crossroads' No Justice for All series, 90.5 WESA’s An-Li Herring takes a look at the Allegheny County public defender’s office, which was sued by its own clients in 1996. They alleged the office wasn’t providing constitutionally adequate representation and ultimately won a settlement. She looks at how the office is doing 20 years later. 

The Confluence, where the news comes together, is 90.5 WESA’s daily news program. Tune in weekdays at 9 a.m. to hear newsmakers and innovators join veteran journalist Kevin Gavin, taking an in-depth look at stories important to the Pittsburgh region. Find more episodes of The Confluence here.

Photo credit: Governor Tom Wolf / Flickr