Philadelphia Eagles

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

Federal authorities say they have intercepted a shipment of 108 phony replica Super Bowl rings representing many past champion teams, including the Pittsburgh Steelers and Philadelphia Eagles.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials say the rings were found in an express consignment parcel that arrived June 18 from Hong Kong marked as alloy rings.

Philadelphia Eagles / Twitter

The Philadelphia Eagles are sporting some bling to commemorate their Super Bowl victory.

Players, coaches and organization members received their rings during a red-carpet party in Philadelphia on Thursday night.

Cast in 10-karat white gold, the ring features 219 diamonds and 17 green sapphires. For the first time, the rings are inscribed with each player's signature.

The ring honors Eagles fans with a silhouette of Lincoln Financial Field and the title of the team's fight song, "Fly, Eagles Fly."

Kiichiro Sato / AP

President Donald Trump rescinded his invitation to the Philadelphia Eagles this week after reports suggested only about 10 players of the 90-member, Super Bowl-winning squad were planning to attend. The President tied the decision to past criticism of players who protested police brutality and harsh treatment of African Americans by kneeling during the "National Anthem."

White House Visits Become Political Litmus Test For Athletes

Jun 7, 2018
Alex Brandon / AP

For victorious sports teams these days, the confetti and champagne are apt to be accompanied by a politically fraught question: Are you going to the White House?

Philadelphia Eagles Coach Says He Wanted To Go To The White House

Jun 6, 2018
Matt Slocum / AP

Eagles coach Doug Pederson said he was looking forward to going to the White House to be recognized as Super Bowl champions but he wouldn't further discuss a visit that was canceled by President Donald Trump.

"I was looking forward to going down, obviously," Pederson said Wednesday. "We did something last season that was very special, a milestone in the city of Philadelphia and for our organization. I was looking forward to being recognized as world champions. It is what it is."

David J. Phillip / AP

Philadelphia is getting the chance to celebrate yet another sports championship with a parade, this time for Villanova University's Wildcats.

Scott Dalton / AP

Fly, Dick's Sporting Goods, fly.

The unlikely win for the Philadelphia Eagles over the New England Patriots in Sunday's Super Bowl LII match up could be a windfall for the sporting goods retailer, despite a headquarters squarely placed in Steeler Nation.

The same sales bump took place after the Chicago Cubs won their first World Series in more than a century.

Analysts with J.P. Morgan wrote Wednesday, "From a similarities perspective, both the Cubs and Eagles have rabid fans that have been starved for a championship for decades."

Laura Benshoff / WHYY

After Sunday’s Super Bowl win, the Philadelphia Eagles have fully assumed the mantle of righteous underdogs.

Can that status resolve a so far intractable political fight over U.S. immigration law?

It’s unlikely, but that has not stopped several Dreamers and the city-based immigration rights group Juntos from asking the Birds to protest a legislative impasse over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program by boycotting a customary visit to the White House for Super Bowl winners.

Eagles Get Hero's Welcome After Winning First Ever Super Bowl Title

Feb 5, 2018
Julia Cortez / AP

Fresh off their first Super Bowl title, the Philadelphia Eagles arrived home to a hero's welcome Monday afternoon, hours after overjoyed fans mobbed the streets in a sometimes unruly victory celebration nearly 60 years in the making.

FracTracker Alliance

Gov. Tom Wolf drew support from both environmentalists and energy insiders when he promised to ease the state's permit application backlog and better enforce regulations by hiring 35 more Department of Environmental Protection inspectors.

Pennsylvania Treasury Department / AP

The Pennsylvania Treasury Department is taking the occasion of the Philadelphia Eagles' appearance this week in the Super Bowl to remind people the state is holding unclaimed property that includes an array of Eagles' memorabilia.

The agency said Monday that anyone can search online to see if anything belongs to them, and while they're looking they can make a wider search for any abandoned property in their name.

Winslow Townson / AP

Pennsylvania's governor plans to travel to Minneapolis this weekend to watch the Philadelphia Eagles take on the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl.

Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf said Monday he'll be paying for his own transportation, tickets and lodging to attend the Sunday night game.

The Eagles' most recent Super Bowl appearance was 13 years ago, a 24-21 loss to the Patriots.

Mel Evans / AP

 

 

Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams has belatedly reported receiving $160,000 in gifts from friends, including $45,000 worth of roof repairs and other home improvements.

Philly.com reports the Democrat omitted the gifts on annual statements of financial interest he filed from 2010 to 2015.

Williams issued a statement through his 2017 re-election campaign citing "the need for greater transparency."

His attorney, Samuel Stretton, called the omissions a "terrible mistake."

Urban Archives / Temple University Libraries

   During World War II, due to shortages, there were plenty of things Americans had to do without and NFL football was nearly one them. The war left the league with a shortage of able bodied men to play the game. So rather than shut down during the 1943 season, the Steelers and the Philadelpha Eagles combined their rosters to form a unified Pennsylvania team; the "Steagles." We'll talk with Matthew Algeo, author of "Last Team Standing: How the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Philadelphia Eagles--'The Steagles' Saved Pro Football During World War II," and Al Wistert, the last surviving Steagle.