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D.D Dumbo: Looping Sounds In An Austin Alleyway

Mystery seems to swirl around D.D Dumbo. We'd heard all sorts of crazy rumors about this solo musician; namely, that Dumbo is a modern-day nomad whose only worldly possessions are his guitar and some crazy customized pedals. But once he arrived for one of our SXSW Backyard Sessions, here's what we discovered: Dumbo was born outside of Melbourne, Australia (birth name: Oliver Hugh Perry). He performs with a 12-string electric guitar, a simple drum set-up and some loop pedals. And he prefers to let his eclectic, drone-filled music speak for itself — so, alas, no comment on the nomad rumors.

If you listen closely to his music, though, one thing is certain: It's hard to nail down Dumbo's influences. As he performed for a curious crowd at Austin's Friends & Neighbors during SXSW, we heard numerous global destinations in his music — including stops in North African deserts, as well as a jaunt to the American South for a touch of the blues. Here, D.D Dumbo showcases two uniquely minimal songs: an unreleased song called "Walrus," and "Tropical Oceans," from his recent self-titled EP.

Set List

  • "Walrus"
  • "Tropical Oceans"
  • Credits

    Producers: Saidah Blount, Mito Habe-Evans; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Videographers: Mito Habe-Evans, Becky Harlan, Olivia Merrion, A.J. Wilhelm; Production Coordinator: Kate Kittredge; Special Thanks: Friends & Neighbors; Executive Producer: Anya Grundmann

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

    Saidah Blount
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