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Study: Many Mothers Don't Wait Long Enough Between Pregnancies

Pregnant mom. (travelingtribe/Flickr)
Pregnant mom. (travelingtribe/Flickr)

The typical time between pregnancies for American mothers is 2.5 years, according to new research. Doctors say that is a healthy amount of time to wait. But a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that nearly a third of women space their births too close – fewer than 18 months between pregnancies.

The study found that “while there is no consensus on optimal IPI [interpregnancy interval], research has shown that short intervals (less than 18 months) and long intervals (60 months or more) were associated with higher risks of adverse health outcomes.”

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Dr. Louis Muglia, director of the Cincinnati Children’s Center for Prevention of Preterm Birth about the effects of short interpregnancy intervals.

Guest

  • Louis Muglia, M.D., director of the Cincinnati Children’s Center for Prevention of Preterm Birth.

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