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Identity & Community
00000176-e6f7-dce8-adff-f6f770f80000Thirty years ago, the Pittsburgh region was losing more of its population than it was attracting each year, with young adults accounting for most of the exodus.Today the region’s population of 20-to-30-somethings, known as Millennials or Gen Y, is on the rise. Millennials increasingly choose to stay or move to Pittsburgh from other towns. Like each generation before them, they bring a unique blend of attitudes and characteristics that reflect their experiences and they’re reshaping Pittsburgh in some interesting ways.This web series reflects the views of Pittsburgh’s next generation, what they have to say about themselves, their community, and where they live and work.

Millennials Rejecting Polarized Politics & Changing Nonprofit Giving

Nonprofits in the region must redefine their community relevance for the Millennial generation as these young adults enter society with a completely different approach to giving.

According to Linda Jones, Vice President of Workplace Campaign for the United Way of Allegheny County, Millennials prefer to give consistently in small amounts as well as volunteer at the organizations they support. They also approach politics differently, rejecting polarized politics and increasingly registering as independents.

These young people, who grew up in an era of instantaneousness, respond best when they can see the impact of their contribution.

“From the political side, we need to demonstrate that something can be accomplished,” says Dana Brown, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Center for Women and Politics at Chatham University. She adds that once Millennials get established in a neighborhood, they often focus on how to improve their community."