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Harrisburg Gunman Came To US Via Family-Based Visa

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Sarah Kovash
/
90.5 WESA
The Department of Homeland Security says a man who fired at officers in Pennsylvania's state capital before he was shot and killed Friday was a naturalized U.S. citizen who was admitted to the country from Egypt on a family-based immigrant visa.

The Department of Homeland Security says a man who fired at officers in Pennsylvania's state capital before he was shot and killed Friday was a naturalized U.S. citizen who was admitted to the country from Egypt on a family-based immigrant visa.

Acting DHS Press Secretary Tyler Q. Houlton says Saturday that "the long chain of migration" that led to Ahmed Aminamin El-Mofty's admission to the U.S. was initiated years ago by a distant relative.

Authorities say El-Mofty fired at a Capitol police officer Friday and later at a state trooper, wounding her. El-Mofty then attacked other officers with two handguns and was killed.

Houlton says incidents like the one involving El-Mofty "highlight the Trump administration's concerns with extended family chain migration." He says chain migration and the diversity visa lottery program have been exploited by extremists.

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