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Navy Yard Shootings: Thursday's Headlines

Flowers, flags and a child's drawing at a makeshift memorial outside the Washington Navy Yard, where a gunman killed 12 people on Monday.
Jonathan Ernst
/
Reuters/Landov
Flowers, flags and a child's drawing at a makeshift memorial outside the Washington Navy Yard, where a gunman killed 12 people on Monday.

Picking up the story from where we last left it, here are some of Thursday's headlines about Monday's mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, in which 12 victims and gunman Aaron Alexis died:

-- "Officials: Navy Yard shooter carved odd messages into his gun before carnage." (The Washington Post)

-- "SWAT team 'stood down' at mass shooting scene ... Capitol Police department has launched a review." (BBC News)

-- "Washington Navy Yard police union: Lax security cost lives." (NBC Washington)

-- "Navy Yard shooter's security clearance based on outdated inquiry." (Los Angeles Times)

-- "Officials never learned of police doubts on gunman's stability." (The New York Times)

-- "Most of Washington Navy Yard reopens for 'regular work day' Thursday." (Federal News Radio)

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