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Whoa! Watch A Spectacular Supercell Take Form In Wyoming

Sometimes some of the most destructive forces in nature can be stunningly beautiful.

On Sunday, storm chasers caught a supercell thunderstorm taking shape in Wyoming. It is absolutely spectacular — the stuff of science-fiction movies:

The crew behind the time-lapse video — Basehunters, out of Norman, Okla. — also tweeted this photograph:

If you're curious about the weather phenomenon, check out the National Weather Service's explanation. In short, supercells are responsible for "for nearly all of the significant tornadoes produced in the U.S. and for most of the hailstones larger than golf ball size."

Supercells are highly organized storms that are helped by veering winds. That means, for example, when winds are blowing from the south at the surface and from the west higher up.

h/t: Capital Weather Gang

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Eyder Peralta is NPR's East Africa correspondent based in Nairobi, Kenya.
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