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CHART: Tracking Retirements From Congress

A record number of Republicans are retiring from the House this year.
Mark Wilson
/
Getty Images

Updated on May 29, 10:53 a.m. ET

The number of House Republicans declining to run for re-election has hit a record level in 2018, as 39 GOP members have said they are leaving: 24 are retiring from public office, while 15 are seeking another position. That includes eight Republicans from districts that Hillary Clinton won in 2016. A total of nine committee chairmen also aren't seeking re-election, along with House Speaker Paul Ryan. One members, Rep. Robert Pittenger, R-N.C., lost his primary.

House Democrats are facing 18 retirements, including four seats they will have to defend in districts President Trump carried.

Just three members of the Senate have announced their retirements, all Republicans.

See who is retiring and how the political winds blow in their districts below:

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Jessica Taylor is a political reporter with NPR based in Washington, DC, covering elections and breaking news out of the White House and Congress. Her reporting can be heard and seen on a variety of NPR platforms, from on air to online. For more than a decade, she has reported on and analyzed House and Senate elections and is a contributing author to the 2020 edition of The Almanac of American Politics and is a senior contributor to The Cook Political Report.
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