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World is seeing the greatest number of conflicts since the end of WWII, U.N. says

In this image taken from UNTV video, United Nation Secretary-General Antonio Guterres addresses an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Ukraine to deplore Russia's actions toward the country and plead for diplomacy, Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2022, at U.N. headquarters.
AP
In this image taken from UNTV video, United Nation Secretary-General Antonio Guterres addresses an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Ukraine to deplore Russia's actions toward the country and plead for diplomacy, Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2022, at U.N. headquarters.

Two billion people, or a quarter of the world's population, now lives in conflict-affected areas, according to the United Nations.

An estimated 84 million people were "forcibly displaced because of conflict, violence and human rights violations," and an estimated 274 million people will need humanitarian assistance due to conflict, the U.N.'s Secretary-General António Guterres said on Wednesday. In remarks to the U.N.'s Peacebuilding Commission, Guterres said the world is experiencing the highest number of violent conflicts since 1945, as World War II drew to a close.

Guterres said the world is grappling with the most conflict since 1945, and proposed a plans to bring stability to places such as Yemen, Myanmar, Syria, Sudan and Ukraine.

Some of the calamities countries are facing include military-led coups, nuclear weapons and terrorist networks.

Guterres said his plan "places prevention and peace-building at the heart of our efforts."

He cited the U.N.'s work in countries such as the Ivory Coast — where the organization encouraged platforms for women and young people to engage in political conversations — and Iraq, where it assisted with the country's COVID-19 response.

Guterres additionally proposed the U.N. aim to get $100 million a year in donations for the agency's Peacebuilding Fund, and said the U.N. should have formal commitments from member states after its April general assembly meeting.

"Second, to support these critical investments, I encourage Member States to come to April's high-level meeting with concrete solutions," he said.

He added: "When we consider the costs of war — to the global economy but most of all to humanity's very soul — peace-building is a bargain and a prerequisite for development and a better future for all."

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