Casey Chafin

News Assistant
Casey Chafin / 90.5 WESA

  The first grants from the endowment created with $60 million fine imposed after the Jerry Sandusky scandal are ready to be distributed this fall.

Josh Shapiro, chairman for the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency, said child advocacy centers will be the recipients.

AP Photo/Andrew Rush

Although Pennsylvania has experienced a recent boom in natural gas production, many wells have no direct connection to the main infrastructure of pipelines.

The Wolf administration has created the Pipeline Infrastructure Task Force (PITF), to oversee the fulfillment of the demand for connecting pipelines.

The Pennsylvania House Health Committee approved a bill aiming to revise the state’s child care benefits so they gradually taper off as a family earns more income on Wednesday.

Casey Chafin / 90.5 WESA

  Local leaders and elected officials recited a pledge vowing to put an end to domestic assault and sexual abuse at a meeting Friday in the courtyard of the Allegheny County Courthouse.

Attendees spoke about why they choose to fight against domestic violence and signed a petition, but admitted they know words on a page won't begin to end the battle against domestic abuse.

The Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum in Pittsburgh will be the first host of a traveling exhibit created to showcase the history of the flying disc. The exhibit coincides with the PDGA Professional World Disc Championships, which take place in Pittsburgh this August, according to The Professional Disc Golf Association (PDGA).

Currently, law enforcement officials in Pennsylvania have the power to seize property they believe to be connected with a crime, even if the owner is not charged, a practice known as civil asset forfeiture.

More than $100 million has been seized in Pennsylvania by way of civil asset forfeitures in the last 10 years, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. A bill proposed by State Sen. Mike Folmer (R-Lebanon) would change the way these forfeitures are handled.

The Carnegie Science Center has received a $614,000 grant to promote education in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

The two-year grant, from The Heinz Endowments, will benefit the Carnegie STEM Excellence Pathway, which offers schools resources to improve their STEM classes.

It is a familiar situation for many: either leave an event to go replenish the soon-to-be expired parking meter, or risk getting a ticket.

Pittsburgh-based MeterFeeder, Inc. has developed a smart parking system to avoid these situations, and the service will soon be available in Homestead.

To start, users must download the free application and enter their plate and credit card information, according to MeterFeeder COO Jeremy Moore.

Although many activities children enjoy are fads, others endure through the generations.

The work of Eric Carle, author and illustrator of several children’s books such as “The Very Hungry Caterpillar,” published in 1969, is one of those enduring elements that children have enjoyed for several decades.  Starting June 13th at the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, kids can experience Carle’s work through the interactive exhibit “Very Eric Carle.”

Gettysburg National Military Park was awarded a $78,000 grant from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) to purchase nearly 9 acres of land in an effort to protect it from development.

This grant is part of a series worth $3.1 million aiming to add nearly 270 total acres to 13 Civil War battlefields.

AP Photo/Victoria Arocho, File

Cases of Lyme disease are on the rise in Allegheny County, with a more than 40-fold increase in a little over a decade.

The Allegheny County Health Department (ACDH) is warning the public of this rise and offering preventive tips.

Whether promoting yard sales, selling strollers or reporting break-ins, Pittsburghers get the good out of social media service Nextdoor

The City of Pittsburgh recently celebrated the one-year anniversary of its partnership with the service, which places users in private online communities comprised solely of members of their own neighborhoods.

The Pennsylvania state Legislature has 253 members. Currently, only 46 of them are women.

The League of Women Voters will discuss this problem, among other issues, at its state convention, which they recently announced will take place in Pittsburgh next month.

Students attending 15 area charter schools collected $11,000 for the Homeless Children’s Education Fund to help ensure the estimated 3,000 homeless students in Allegheny County receive a proper education.

“The students grabbed the idea,” said Jeremy Resnick, executive director and co-founder of Propel Schools. “They did everything from penny wars between classrooms to putting on a big art show and selling tickets for it. There was just a huge range of activity across the schools that the students led, and it’s inspiring.”

Duquesne University received one of seven new clean energy project grants awarded by the Department of Community and Economic Development throughout the state.

The university will use the $2 million to replace its current 50-year-old boilers with larger, higher-efficiency ones.

“We found out about this and we made a decision, why don’t we apply for it and see if we could get it,” said Rod Dobish, executive director of facilities management at Duquesne. “We made a conscious decision to do that.”

More than 3.5 million Americans currently live with some form of autism spectrum disorder, according to the Autism Society.

The University of Pittsburgh will soon begin a study testing two different non-drug treatments for adults with autism, thanks to a $3.2 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health.

Shaun Eack, associate professor of social work and psychiatry at the university, will lead the research.

Bicycle accidents account for only 3.7 percent of reported crashes, yet they comprise 11.2 percent of all traffic fatalities, according to PennDOT.

On Wednesday evening, local bicyclists will gather in silent protest to honor victims of bicycle-related traffic accidents at Pittsburgh’s 11th annual Ride of Silence.

“The Ride of Silence is part of a global event,” said Ngani Ndimbie, spokesperson for Bike Pittsburgh. “It’s an event that was created to remember and to honor the people who have been killed and injured due to traffic violence while riding their bicycles.”

Pittsburghers have long enjoyed fireworks, and now they can anticipate even more.

PyroFest, the fireworks festival with the largest number of displays in the country, is held annually in western Pennsylvania and will have an even larger home this year.

The signs read “work zone...reduce speed," but some Pennsylvania drivers are failing to get the message.

Three state senators have introduced legislation aimed at creating safer work zones on highways within the commonwealth.

The bills would raise fines and place cameras within active construction zones, according Sen. Jay Costa (D-Allegheny).

Costa’s bill, specifically aimed at increasing fines and penalties, would require a one-year license suspension and $10,000 fine to any driver who kills a highway worker or first responder in a work zone.

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