Katie Blackley

DIGITAL EDITOR/PRODUCER, INTERNSHIP COORDINATOR

Katie Blackley is a digital editor/producer for 90.5 WESA, where she writes, edits and generates both web and on-air content for features and daily broadcast. She's the producer of Pittsburgh Explainer and our Good Question! series and can usually be found exploring the city, answering inquiries from curious listeners. She also reports on Pittsburgh's LGBTQ+ community and is co-president of the local chapter of NLGJA.

She's the author of a book based on the Good Question! series.

After graduating from Duquesne University, Katie was an editor for KQV 1410 AM in downtown Pittsburgh and did freelance video work for the Civic Light Opera.

She’s passionate about all things Pittsburgh and believes someday she’ll solve the Pittsburgh Protractor Mystery. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

As 13 western Pennsylvania counties prepare to move into Gov. Tom Wolf’s yellow phase of reopening May 15, local businesses and officials are cautiously optimistic.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Twenty-four northwestern and north-central Pennsylvania counties move into the "yellow" phase of Gov. Tom Wolf's reopening plan Friday. Businesses will begin to flip their "closed" signs to "open," all while taking precautionary health and safety measures. 

Matt Rourke / AP

The coronavirus pandemic has made the world feel small for many people. Some haven't left their neighborhoods in weeks; others haven't even left their homes. It's also impacting the people and businesses who supply our food, with numerous farmers and growers around the state having to alter their operations to meet changing demand.


Archives & Special Collections / University of Pittsburgh Library System

Matt Rourke / AP

  

In two weeks, Pennsylvania’s economy will see a gradual reopening. Gov. Tom Wolf set May 8 as the target date for certain regions of the commonwealth to begin easing social distancing measures.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

A number of Pittsburgh-area museums, galleries and organizations are hosting virtual tours or performances throughout the next few weeks. From coloring books to artist talks to virtual scavenger hunts, here are some of the local offerings:

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA


It’s been about a month since schools and businesses shut down in Pennsylvania, in an effort to stop the spread of the novel coronavirus. The goal of these restrictive social distancing measures is to flatten the curve.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Vehicles lined the streets around Pittsburgh's downtown hockey arena Friday to receive boxes of non-perishable products and frozen meats distributed by the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Allegheny County residents are eager to see if the curve of COVID-19 cases is flattening and wondering when life might return to normal. 

Archives & Special Collections / University of Pittsburgh Library System


Before highways and railroads crisscrossed the commonwealth, a series of linked waterways and inclined planes brought people and goods across the state. The Pennsylvania Canal was a significant engineering achievement when it was constructed in 1826.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Lawrenceville is one of Pittsburgh’s oldest and largest neighborhoods. Founded in 1814, it was named for Captain James Lawrence, who served in the War of 1812 (of “Don’t Give Up The Ship!” fame). 

 

 

Kailey Love / 90.5 WESA

From Grant Street in downtown Pittsburgh, the Koppers Building somewhat blends in with the city’s looming skyscrapers. But when it was first constructed, the 475-foot limestone and granite tower was one of the most distinctive buildings in Pittsburgh. 

Carly Lough / Heinz History Center

Homemade art, videos and social media posts about the coronavirus’ impact in Pittsburgh are being sought by the Heinz History Center. People are asked to submit any digital or physical example of how the city is experiencing and responding to this unprecedented historic event.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

It will be at least another month before life can be expected to go back to normal due to restrictions related to the novel coronavirus. Gov. Tom Wolf has extended his stay-at-home order and expanded it to include the entire state of Pennsylvania. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Allegheny Health Network began assembling COVID-19 test kits in its downtown Highmark Health Penn Avenue Place building this week. Dozens of tables with medical staffers lined the auditorium of the building filled with sterile media tubes, swabs, instructions, and biohazard bags.

Seth Weing / AP

Medical marijuana dispensaries have implemented curbside pick-up, online ordering, and set designated shopping hours for the nearly 153,000 Pennsylvanians who receive cannabis through the state program. 

Mark Nootbaar / 90.5 WESA

It's week two of extreme social distancing in Pittsburgh, in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. Allegheny County and a number of other Pennsylvania counties are under a "stay-at-home" order from Gov. Tom Wolf. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Area grocery stores have increased health and safety measures for employees to help slow the spread of COVID-19. From markers on the floor that signify appropriate social distancing to store hours designated for vulnerable populations, here’s how local stores are adjusting their operations:

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Going a little stir crazy? Pittsburgh residents can take a break from idle time and work-from-home routines and get to know the city’s history while taking a stroll. Here’s a guide to one of a number of upcoming tours WESA is compiling for history lovers throughout the region.

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

It's been a weird week in Pittsburgh and all over the country. The threat of the coronavirus has people staying home, schools and businesses are closed, events are canceled. Families are at home taking care of young children and pharmacies and grocery stores are busier than ever as people prepare for what could be a protracted period of social distancing. 


Ariel Worthy / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto has declared a state of emergency in the city effective Monday, March 16 at 9 a.m. The declaration prohibits gatherings of more than 250 people.

Jared Murphy / 90.5 WESA

Child care facilities and after school programs in the Pittsburgh region are developing plans if there are large-scale school closures. Most centers remain open, with caretakers emphasizing good hygiene among children. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Coronavirus has now spread to more than 100 countries, representing two-thirds of the world’s population. In Pittsburgh, large events are being canceled; college classes are moving online; and everyone’s taking extra long to wash their hands.

Helping explain the headlines this week from the WESA newsroom:

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On Wednesday, Carnegie Mellon University, the University of PittsburghDuquesne University, Chatham University, and Robert Morris University announced they are switching all classes to online instruction as the schools prepare for a possible spread of COVID-19

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh area organizations have taken precautionary measures as the coronavirus spreads, and Pennsylvania Senator Bob Casey says emergency funds need more support. The Allegheny County Health Department has a new director, Dr. Debra Bogen, a pediatrician from UPMC Children's hospital. And, how will voters respond to a future Democratic presidential candidate’s stance on fracking?

Allegheny County

A pediatrician will be the new director of the Allegheny County Health Department. Dr. Debra Bogen is currently the vice chair for education in the Department of Pediatrics at UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. Pending state approval, she'll take over the role permanently on May 4.

Heinz Memorial Chapel

Poet Emily Dickinson, American Red Cross founder Clara Barton and warrior Joan of Arc are among the women depicted in colorful stained glass windows at the Heinz Memorial Chapel in Oakland. An upcoming tour highlights the accomplishments of these and 54 other historic women, whose legacies are preserved in the 82-year-old neo-Gothic building.

90.5 WESA

A pipeline company is under federal investigation over a 2018 natural gas pipeline explosion in Beaver County. Enrollment continues to decline in Allegheny County for a state supplemental nutrition program. And, PennDOT faces a funding cliff and dwindling resources.

Pittsburgh Black Film Network

Citing a lack of diversity in the local film industry, a new group called the Pittsburgh Black Film Network connects directors, actors and crew to resources throughout the city. On Thursday evening, the organization will host a festival of short films made by African-American directors and producers.

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