Kevin Gavin

Host of The Confluence

Kevin Gavin is a native Pittsburgher and has worked in public broadcasting since his college years. Gavin served as news director for 90.5 WDUQ for 34 years, and following the sale of the radio station by Duquesne University to Pittsburgh EPM, Inc., he was appointed Director of Internships and Training.

Ways to Connect

Keith Srakocic / AP

 


On today's program: COVID-19 cases in Allegheny County continue to rise; federal and state authorities are investigating the Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center where 82 residents have died during the pandemic; and a preview of a new WESA podcast, Land and Power.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The Trump campaign filed suit in federal court to stop certification of Pennsylvania’s election results; the Pittsburgh Steelers currently have their best start to a season since 1978; and the Film Pittsburgh Fall Festival presents dozens of full-length and short films completely virtually.

Rachel Gobep / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto presented Pittsburgh’s proposed 2021 budget earlier this week. It includes an almost 10 percent cut in police funding; and the latest phase of a sky mapping project could help answer long-held questions about our universe.

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

 


On today's program: The Pennsylvania Department of Health reported another record high number of COVID-19 cases this past weekend; and Democrats won the presidency, but didn’t fare as well on down ballot races.

Evan Vucci / AP

 


On today's program: The polls are closed, but President Trump continues to ratchet up the rhetoric around the presidential election; traditional retail spaces look for untraditional tenants as demand for storefronts in malls continues to go down; and a new grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services aims to increase access to technology in shelters. 

Julio Cortez / AP

 


On today's program: Ballots are still being counted in Pennsylvania and other swing states; and the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museums, and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Carnegie Institute. 

Matt Rourke / AP

 


On today's program: Pennsylvania has begun to tally votes, but final results won’t be available for a few days; and, as ballots are processed, Pennsylvania and other states could see more legal challenges.

Matt York / AP

On today's program: Women cast ballots at higher rates than men, but don’t vote in a bloc; workers at the Allegheny County Elections Division warehouse will begin pre-canvassing mail-in ballots this morning; and the Neighborhood Resilience Project is trying to recruit African American volunteers for COVID-19 vaccine trials.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority is requesting proposals for a stormwater master plan to stop stormwater and sewage overflows in the region; how to deal with election stress; and safety precautions to stay safe while voting in person.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 


On today's program: The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board approved a proposal to waive liquor license fees to provide financial relief to restaurants and bars hit hard by the pandemic; researchers try to take down disinformation using science and technology; and how Donald Trump’s and Joe Biden’s differences on environmental and energy policies could affect Pennsylvania.

Matt Rourke / AP

 


On today's program: Hospitalizations for COVID-19 cases are rising, but an infectious disease expert says hospitals in the Pittsburgh region aren’t stretched too thin; Riverlife is looking for public suggestions on how to fill the gaps in the loop connecting the city’s riverfronts; and a preview of a local House race where a long-term incumbent is facing a stiff challenge.

Kathleen J. Davis / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The Tree of Life community continues to live with the aftermath of the 2018 attack; a survivor of a Nazi concentration camp and the Tree of Life worshipper shares his story; and a writer documents the resilience of the Squirrel Hill community in a new book.

Francisco Seco / AP

 

On today's program: Parents deal with the challenges of online school; the pandemic is exacerbating educational inequality for already at-risk students; the lack of classroom, hallway and cafeteria socialization could negatively impact English language learners; and for Good Question, Kid! experts answer questions about language and geography.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The FCC is calling on governors to regulate rates and fees for intrastate phone calls; LGBTQ candidates in the general election could encourage more people from underrepresented groups to run for office; and drive-in theaters are enjoying a resurgence in popularity during the pandemic. 

Emma Lee / WHYY

 


On today's program: Allegheny County Rich Fitzgerald has proposed a new department for children initiatives; a new report showcases problems with policing and ways to address them; and voters discuss the reliability of election results. 

90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: A task force assembled in June released its report about current police practices; three clinical trials for potential coronavirus vaccines were paused after some participants got sick; and this year’s flu shot could serve as a dress rehearsal for when a coronavirus vaccine becomes available. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Allegheny County solicitor Andy Szefi answers questions about voting ahead of the general election; and this year, voters might not know election results on election night.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: A nationwide project tackles voter confusion in the lead up to the general election; a research project is developing new guidelines to help break the cycle of opioid prescriptions in dental settings; and Pittsburgh musician Ernie Hawkins remembers blues legend Reverend Gary Davis. 

Ryan Loew / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The Port Authority of Allegheny County is looking for a Director of Equity and Inclusion; and City of Asylum has a new executive director. 

Evan Vucci / AP

 


On today's program: State Republicans strategize to hold on to Pennsylvania in the general election; StoryCorps’ One Small Step project aims to bring people with differing views together; and a One Small Step conversation between two Pittsburghers. 

Carolyn Kaster / AP

 


On today's program: U.S. Senator Pat Toomey will not seek a third term in 2022 and will not run for governor; state Democrats want to turn Pennsylvania blue in the 2020 election; and Pittsburgh author Lee Gutkind discusses his new memoir.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 


On today's program: The Department of Agriculture mandates federally-funded Farmers to Families Food Boxes include a letter from President Trump; a rare bird was discovered in Westmoreland County; and the Black Lives Matter movement finds support in rural Pennsylvania. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 


On today's program: The NFL deals with its first coronavirus outbreak; one man is crossing Pennsylvania to distribute thousands of yard signs before the election; and the dispute over a successor to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg adds more tension to a divisive election year.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: A recap of the key takeaways for Pennsylvania voters after the first presidential debate; the Pittsburgh Regional Alliance has unveiled a new brand to market the area to businesses and individuals; and a local nonprofit is working to make sure Pittsburgh’s Latino community counts in the 2020 census.

Alan Diaz / AP

 


On today's program: Initial reports suggest nine ballots from military personnel found discarded were a mistake, not voter fraud; air passenger traffic at Pittsburgh International Airport has plateaued after a slight bump; and the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way people mourn. 

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Online schooling poses new challenges for students enrolled in special education courses; new learning environments put teachers under stress and impact their mental health; some parents are turning to learning hubs for childcare and help with school work; and for Good Question, Kid! a teacher answers students’ science questions. 

Seth Perlman / AP

 


On today's program: After a report found that Black students in Pittsburgh are referred to the juvenile justice system at much higher rates than their white peers, the Pittsburgh Board of Education says they will take steps to reimagine school safety; machine learning could help proactively identify children most at-risk for lead poisoning; and how fire hydrants ended up on trails in Frick Park.

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The long-lasting impacts of redlining are still felt in some Pittsburgh neighborhoods; the Pittsburgh Art Commission plans to debate the removal of the Christopher Columbus statue in Schenley Park; and Puerto Ricans living in Pennsylvania after being displaced by Hurricane Maria look forward to voting in the U.S. presidential election. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The City of Pittsburgh has a budget shortfall of about $100 million due to the pandemic-induced recession, but Allegheny County’s finances are more stable; during the pandemic, the League of Women Voters adapts their voter outreach strategies; and hotel workers face difficult decisions as the industry remains in limbo. 

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: COVID-19 cases are up slightly in Allegheny County since the start of the school year; a preview of the races for president, state row offices, and legislative seats in Pennsylvania; and a look at the 28th House district race to replace former House Speaker Mike Turzai. 

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