Kevin Gavin

Host of The Confluence

Kevin Gavin is a native Pittsburgher and has worked in public broadcasting since his college years. Gavin served as news director for 90.5 WDUQ for 34 years, and following the sale of the radio station by Duquesne University to Pittsburgh EPM, Inc., he was appointed Director of Internships and Training.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Riverlife

On today's program: Riverlife's new CEO says development is critical to riverfront protection; how federal refugee caps are affecting Pennsylvania's immigrants; why Jewish New Year celebrations are being celebrated at a Christian sanctuary; Sen. Bob Casey says Dems can't put progressive ideas ahead of actually winning the election; and the nation's first openly transgender swimmer on what it took to compete in the NCAA.

PennDOT

On today's program: John Fetterman says time is now for recreational marijuana in Pennsylvania; PennDOT is preparing to test autonomous cars in highway construction zones; and a preview of how libraries and librarians have had to adapt to keep up with changing technologies and expectations.

Provided by Arielle Evans / Courtesy of HundrED

On today's program: Pittsburgh education takes an international honor; apple growers face an unknown threat that's killing trees; school districts are debating allowing teachers to carry guns in classrooms; and a chance to check-in on your 2020 Democratic hopeful bingo card.

Sarah Boden / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Port Authority CEO Katharine Kelleman explains the latest adjustment to Pittsburgh's federal BRT application; legislation would mandate adult changing tables in public venues; and the United Steelworkers will represent 90 tech workers contracted with Google.

Grant Eldridge / Audubon Photography Awards

On today's program: New prison parole policies could follow in the wake of recent homicides; a deadly mosquito-born virus has moved into Pennsylvania; Open Doors Pittsburgh returns with new spaces and insider tours; and what locals can do to support disappearing migratory bird populations.

Marion Ettinger / Penguin Random House

On today's program: Author Sigrid Nunez breaks hearts with puppy love; an Oakland man insists mentorship has no retirement age; Pittsburgh's historic buildings were identified, but not protected; a peek at ALCOSAN's long-awaited sewege plan; and how the South Hills are recovering after a gargantuan water main break flooded multiple neighborhoods.

Evan Agostini / Invision/AP

On today's program: A former senior White House advisor is on her way to Pittsburgh; how recent headlines about Daylin Leach and Mike Folmer will affect the opening session of the Pennsylvania Senate; a federal policy shift could affect health outcomes for immigrant children; a veteran climate change activist says people should ask more from their governments; and how Pennsylvania students are (and aren't) taught about climate science.

Courtesy of Tree Pittsburgh

On today's program: Tree Pittsburgh looks to a giveaway to help the city's tree canopy; a philosopher tries to understand climate science deniers and change their minds; NPR's David Greene peeps the upcoming hockey season; how Pittsburgh isn’t preparing for potential climate migration; and a new immersive theatre project explores how AI affects modern life and whether humans have a say. 

Christy Bostardi

On today's program: A blues guitarist-turned-philosopher explains his unorthodox education; five prisoners write a book about life behind bars; how piano-making took root in Pittsburgh; and what to look for from Banned Books Week in Pittsburgh.

Courtesy of YouthPlaces

On today's program: A North Side nonprofit will host an after school program at the convention center; state lawmakers could consider changing Pennsylvania's life without parole sentencing structure; a check in with the Pittsburgh diocese a year after a salacious grand jury report; and the state House reconvenes today with an agenda that could include new work requirements for Medicaid recipients. 

Penguin Random House

On today's program: A food writer follows a cast extraordinary chefs around the world, and casts his sights on Pittsburgh; a local group is teaching families how to advocate for quality medical care; Allegheny County sees its first jury conviction using a 30-year-old law; and citizens could be responsible for redrawing state legislative districts—if lawmakers are willing to give that up.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: A local leader is coordinating a national strategy for how the government can better support family caregivers; how Allegheny County tracks and treats a Hepatitis A outbreak; a Duquesne University forum digs into the mind of a serial killer; and City Council wants some control over how a proposed park tax would be spent. 

Bill O'Driscoll / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: DNA excavated from a nearby rockshelter could tell us about humanity 19,000 years ago; how the once-lost running buffalo clover has rebounded; why Pennsylvania is suing the family behind Purdue Pharma; and Pittsburgh ranks among the most sustainable for its building practices.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: Two state legislators want to pass a bill to confront sexual harassment in state government; how the flu shot can strengthen herd immunity; a regulations loophole might be to blame for toxic landfill runoff; and the state plans to close the Polk Center for adults with intellectual disabilities. 

R. Alan Adams Photography

On today's program: Point Park teams up with a Mississippi newsroom to investigate lead in water; how the "felony murder" charge has given thousands life sentences, despite many having nothing to do with the homicide; and a year into a merger, how is Pittsburgh's early music organization keeping baroque alive?

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

On today's program: Pennsylvania farmers are seeing the impact of trade tariffs with China; a local project is spreading kindness with a needle and thread; the Wolf administration is commuting more life sentences; and a very common, very toxic chemical is contaminating water supplies.

Courtesy of The University of Pittsburgh

On today's program: Provost Ann Cudd says Pitt’s Pell match will make the school more competitive; Pittsburgh remembers Mac Miller one year after his death; local police want to diversify their ranks; an anthology of art that uniquely reflects Pittsburgh; and the Steelers start their regular season against New England. 

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Propel charter schools are prioritizing early learning benchmarks; fires in the Amazon rainforest are diminishing migratory bird habitats; a lot of Pittsburghers think they live in the Midwest; and local universities want to register more student voters ahead of the 2020 elections. 

Courtesy of ReelAbilities Pittsburgh

On today's program: Gov. Tom Wolf hopes his recent executive orders lead to chamber-debated legislation; a reform commission suggests creating a new team to redraw PA's congressional map in 2020; Pittsburgh's Shakespeare in the Park presents a brand new take on the story of Caesar; and a film festival spotlights the work and stories of people with different abilities. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

On today's program: How Pittsburgh's community gardens embody neighborhood flair; what it means to study osteopathic medicine; how the city's micromobility priorities are evolving; what the Allegheny Conference is considering to re-brand Pittsburgh; and why Allegheny County has few options to replace voting machines ahead of the 2020 election. 

Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures

On today's program: What it takes to find balance for Pittsburgh's reading and listening pleasure; how the Allegheny County Jail educates the minors in its charge; impeachment talks are dividing the activists who helped propel Conor Lamb to victory; a look at the opioid epidemic tracks with previous substance use plagues; and a starter list of Pittsburgh must-sees.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Black newspapers can weather shifts in community news; parents worry about a controversial herbicide being used on school property; some Tree of Life congregants disagree with a death penalty for Robert Bowers; the nation's largest Amish settlement is being encroached on by development; Amazon partners with the Pittsburgh Health Data Alliance; and NPR's David Greene hopes the Steelers can overcome a distraction-filled postseason. 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

On today's program: Parishoners call for change in the Pittsburgh Diocese; Lancaster is one of Pennsylvania’s fastest-growing counties, in part because of Amish population growth; local archaeologists find evidence of a community 8,000 years old; and RMU's price match program expands beyond the Pittsburgh area.

Richard Vogel / AP

On today's program: Bomb and shooting threats are up in schools nationwide, even in Pittsburgh; the Clean Air Council is taking the Clairton Coke Works to court; and a new program helps prepare African American leaders for future corporate success.

Courtesy of Vincentian Collaborative System

On today's program: Pittsburgh Public superintendent Anthony Hamlet looks ahead to a new semester; volunteers clean up illegal dumps in Allegheny County; panthers once ruled Pennsylvania; and a new program trades tech skills for free residency in a unique, intergenerational community.

Ross Mantle / BuzzFeed News

On today's program: Allegheny County is a hotbed for false insurance fraud claims; Pittsburgher David Greene sheds a tear for another lost Pirates season; the airport solicits local venders to be part of its new terminal build; and WESA's Chris Potter draws a fuzzy line between political rally and campaign stop.

Courtesy of the Pittsburgh Riverhounds

On today’s program: Soccer attendance is on the rise in Pittsburgh, likely thanks to the U.S. Women's team; PFAS chemicals were discovered near Pittsburgh International; a poet reckons with her multi-racial identity; and Shady Side Academy teens reflect on their student Emmy Award nomination. 

Ryan Loew / PublicSource

On today’s program: Pennsylvania's attorney general marks one year since the release of a grand jury report exposing widespread clergy abuse; how sidewalks form an overlooked part of Pittsburgh’s transportation network; a school security expert examines the effectiveness of current protections, and a panel weighs in on the harmful effects of active shooter drills in schools.

Mike Wereschagin / The Caucus

On today’s program: Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala has a vast surveillance camera system with the ability to recognize license plates, faces and more; drug testing strips could help prevent overdose deaths, but they're illegal in Pennsylvania; a UPMC symposium centers on transgender and non-binary health care needs; a tour of World War II aircraft comes to Butler; and a preview of Trump’s visit to Shell’s new Beaver County ethane cracker.

DA’s camera network spurs privacy concerns
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Carnegie Mellon University

On today's program: Social science and artificial intelligence are combining to fight disinformation on social media; how volunteerism creates community in the South Side; the Democratic ticket for the 18th Congressional district takes on gun control; and PWSA prepares to bring the Highland Park reservoir back online.

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