Kevin Gavin

Host of The Confluence

Kevin Gavin is a native Pittsburgher and has worked in public broadcasting since his college years. Gavin served as news director for 90.5 WDUQ for 34 years, and following the sale of the radio station by Duquesne University to Pittsburgh EPM, Inc., he was appointed Director of Internships and Training.

Ways to Connect

Library of Congress

On today’s program: Voting access still has a long way to go, 100 years after PA ratified women's suffrage; Pennsylvanians spend big on the lottery; SETpoint provides self-defense training for people at risk of gender-based violence; fracking in Ohio brings money and complications; and Pittsburgh considers microtransit partnerships.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: Pittsburgh Public Schools superintendent Anthony Hamlet talks about district transformation and his take on a contraversial trip to Cuba; DNA testing kits illuminate lost branches of family trees, but may not tell the full story; and one year after his death, Antwon Rose II’s classmates remember him, followed by a conversation about community healing and changes in policy and policing.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: The Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival is bringing Patti LaBelle, Makaya McCraven and a stacked lineup of jazz and funk musicians to town; a PA House bill could expand insurance coverage for treating Lyme disease; local poet and founder of the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange Michael Wurster publishes his fourth anthology; and PWSA explains how existing programs can help low-income residents pay their water bills.

Courtesy of Debbie Reynolds / Twitter

On today’s program: A Baldwin-Whitehall middle school teacher is working with the U.S. Navy to establish STEM education standards; a Pittsburgh businessman is paying it forward by mentoring young people in his community; a Pitt professor is looking beyond grocery store shelves to find ways to eat ethically; and a new group of science writers is building a bridge between shrinking newsrooms and telling science stories.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

On today’s program: Pride month celebrations kick off in Pittsburgh this weekend; the Mattress Factory art museum tries to find its footing after sexual misconduct allegations rocked its staff last year; PA motorists are nearly three times as likely to die on rural roads than the rest of the nation; a look at what happened in the primary elections and other political news; and the Three Rivers Arts Festival begins Downtown tonight.

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum commemorates the 75th anniversary of D-Day in a special exhibition; Allegheny County is enlisting volunteers to report of the welfare of area bees; WITF’s Tim Lambert uncovers two Butler County soldiers behind an iconic WWII photo; and a 94-year-old former Army medic recounts his time on Omaha Beach.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

On today’s program: City officials want public input on autonomous vehicles; Yuengling celebrates nearly two centuries employing generations of Pottsville families; the National Council of Jewish Women is talking about how to get more voters to the polls; and after a gag order was lifted, details of a fracking settlement have been made public. 

Jessica Kourkounis / AP

On today's program: Potential solutions to Pennsylvania's growing pension crisis; former mined lands are being converted into forests; and how preventive medicine can inform a diagnosis before disease takes root. 

Dan Speicher / Tribune-Review

On today’s program: Robotics are injecting new life into manufacturing; the Advanced Leadership Initiative brings experienced black executives to the C-suite; only half of eligible Pennsylvanians are receiving WIC assistance; and a Tribune-Review report finds a lack of oversight in regional public pools. 

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: The number of kids in foster care has increased as the opioid epidemic grows; Pittsburgh has a half-hidden fountain of youth; FBI documents could cast a shadow on the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.; peregrine falcons have found a home at the Rachel Carson state office building in Harrisburg; and Pittsburgh is getting more than 90 beers to honor each of its official and unofficial neighborhoods. 

Lindsay Dill / Allegheny Land Trust

On today’s program: The Allegheny Land Trust is protecting a former mine from developers; water from military bases near Pittsburgh International Airport is being contaminated by toxic chemicals; U.S. Congressman Conor Lamb talks Russia investigation and abortion bans; the kids for cash scandal gets a musical; and a national tournament for blind bowlers comes to Pittsburgh.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

On today’s program: PA's Supreme Court kicks the UPMC/Highmark case back down to a lower court; exposure to high levels of pollution may lead to increased risk of childhood cancer; and the final installment of WESA's series Still Working.

Stephanie Strasburg / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On today’s program: Pittsburgh makes a new commitment to equity with a dedicated city office; prosecuting the opioid crisis is sometimes a supply-and-demand challenge; gender-sexuality alliances are evolving in Pittsburgh-area schools; and survivors of sexual assault in local Amish and Mennonite communities share their stories.

City's Office of Equity to replace Bureau of Neighborhood Empowerment
(00:00 – 6:18)

Gene J. Puskar / AP

On today's program: business investment indicators increased in the region; the Braddock Battlefield History Center is reopening; Kim Gordon puts music to a Warhol silent film classic; and a new production tells the story of a future where holographic companions replace lost loved ones.   

U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigations

On today’s program: Building a case against cybercrimincals can be tough, but apprehending them is a lot harder; Democratic presidential candidates explore climate change; a Buffalo organization helps immigrants find their place in America; 143 Day in Pennsylvania honors Fred Rogers; and Pittsburgh’s population is changing beyond the numbers.

Rachel Gobep / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: How to prevent infectious diseases; a breakdown of yesterday’s primary election results; Mayor Bill Peduto on cybersecurity, postponing gun control ordinances and legalizing recreational marijuana; and an old amusement park near Lake Erie searches for its place in the 21st Century.

Gerry Bloome / AP

On today’s program: A look at Pittsburgh’s primary elections; scientists seek a cure for a disease endangering Pennsylvania’s bat populations; online privacy on display through the Carnegie libraries; and the controversies and constitutionality of facial recognition technology.

Courtesy of Lidia Bastianich

On today’s program: Celebrity chef Lidia Bastianich talks about her culinary empire and bringing people together with food; a workspace and art gallery serves as a showcase for up-and-coming artists; CMU shares how AI could be used to assist surgeons in planning cardiac operations; and a new tax shelter creates new investment in Pittsburgh, but may also speed up gentrification.

Courtesy of The University of Pittsburgh

On today's program: The University of Pittsburgh just got a treasure trove from the estate of horror great George Romero; a queer youth theater program is debuting a new multimedia production; City Council District 9 candidates are readying for Tuesday's primary election; CEOs take a stand against the stigma around mental illness; and the state's top court hears from both sides of the UPMC / Highmark split. 

Abby Warhola
The Andy Warhol Museum

Silver walls adorning the Andy Warhol Museum's event space are taking on new meaning this week as the organization celebrates 25 years in Pittsburgh’s North Side. Executive director Patrick Moore says they haven’t stopped growing since.

Wikimedia Commons

The Hill Community Development Corporation is hoping a $55 million project to redevelop the New Granada Theater block will be a catalyst to continued development in the area. The project will include office and retail space as well as mixed-income housing units, according to CEO Marimba Milliones.

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

Jeremy Resnick co-founded Propel Charter Schools in the basement of a Homestead hospital more than 16 years ago, and helmed the organization as it's expanded to 4,000 students in 13 distinct schools.

Courtesy of The Tamburitzans

Tamburitza folk music is inherently a genre of many cultures – it’s played by a family of lute guitars that combine the Persian tanbur with a mandolin and classical guitar. The music traditionally celebrates the culture of Eastern European countries, but the new executive director of the Pittsburgh Tamburitzans is hoping to expand the reach of their repertoire to include countries like Greece and Ireland.

Steven Senne / AP

Lt. Gov. John Fetterman is bringing his statewide marijuana listening tour to Allegheny County this weekend. He’ll visit the Community Empowerment Association in Homewood and then the Penn State McKeesport campus, both on Saturday.

Katie Blackley / WESA

Hatred manifests itself in flyers distributed in certain neighborhoods, in internet postings, and as Pittsburghers know too well--through violent, even deadly acts. Is the hate movement increasing? 

Kathleen Blee, dean of the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences and the College of General Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, says yes, and its participants have learned from their forebearers.

Courtesy of Allegheny College

Educator Hilary Link will soon trade the Eternal City for Allegheny College in Meadville where she says she's excited to help foster student growth year-over-year. 

Courtesy of the Republican Party of Pennsylvania

After the 2018 midterm election, the Pennsylvania Congressional delegation made a big shift from 13 Republicans and five Democrats to an even split of 9-9, but Pennsylvania Republican Party chair Val DiGiorgio says he’s not worried about the 2020 presidential race.

Julia Zenkevich / 90.5 WESA

Pennsylvania democrats are counting on the midterm momentum they garnered last year as they gear up for the 2020 presidential race. Donald Trump's victory in Pennsylvania in 2016 came as a surprise to many democrats, including Nancy Patton Mills, who now serves as chair of the Pennsylvania Democratic Party

Gene J. Puskar / AP

U.S. Steel plans to spend $1 billion to upgrade its Clairton Coke Works and Edgar Thomson facilities near Pittsburgh. Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald says he's thrilled to see Pittsburgh return to the forefront of steel manufacturing—that the investment could help stabilize steel jobs in the region, but likely won't create any new positions.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Officers assigned to missing persons cases often aren’t given the best resources for their search and rescue dogs to trail the lost or kidnapped person, but a new kit could change that.

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