Kevin Gavin

Host of The Confluence

Kevin Gavin is a native Pittsburgher and has worked in public broadcasting since his college years. Gavin served as news director for 90.5 WDUQ for 34 years, and following the sale of the radio station by Duquesne University to Pittsburgh EPM, Inc., he was appointed Director of Internships and Training.

Ways to Connect

 


On today's program: A Murrysville company says it’s under “no moral obligation” to produce taxpayer-funded ventilators faster because of the pandemic; how domestic abuse shelters are adapting during the outbreak; and with their storefronts closed, local bookshop owners share fears and strategies for survival.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: What to expect when venturing into city parks; 911 centers will know if they’re responding to COVID-19 patients; and scientists need help from amateur researchers.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: How COVID-19 is affecting media outlets in Pittsburgh; funerals are evolving to allow for social distancing; and what newly greening plants can teach us about climate change.

Mark Nootbaar / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: How the nation’s $2 trillion stimulus package could land in Pittsburgh; what we know so far about PA’s record number of unemployment claims; and how home health workers are trying to stay safe during the pandemic.

On today's program: Pittsburgh's mayor says it will be weeks before local coronavirus cases peak; residents ask whether the government should direct more resources to people struggling during the pandemic; and a look at how local arts groups are coping with widespread shutdowns.

Gensler + HDR in association with luis vidal + architects / Allegheny County Airport Authority

 


On today's program: Protecting people from the outbreak could have dire consequences for those sheltering in place with an abuser; and PIT will wait for a less volatile stock market to break ground on its $1.1 billion terminal project.

Courtesy of Northside Common Ministries

On today's program: How one homeless shelter is coping during the pandemic; why UPMC says elective procedures should proceed, even as resources remain tight; and farmers are declared life-sustaining, but it’s unclear where they can sell their food.

Courtesy 412 Food Rescue

 

On today's program: How a local food waste prevention group is adapting to social distancing; scammers are capitalizing on the coronavirus outbreak; and advice from child psychologists about explaining COVID-19 to children.  

Carolyn Kaster / AP

On today's program: The state prison system grapples with social distancing for staff and inmates; a look at our region’s health care system and its readiness to take on more sick people; and PA is creeping closer to its new mail-in voting deadline.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: How the state accelerated Pittsburgh Public Schools’ plan to close; why some hospital workers worry they don’t have enough protective gear; what the U.S. Census is doing to mitigate exposure to COVID-19; and a peek into the decision-making process behind public restrictions in Allegheny County.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: A look at the latest stories from the WESA newsroom about the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact locally; residential water wells in Pennsylvania are not monitored for potentially dangerous bacteria; a reporter lists the top power players in Harrisburg; and Pittsburgh’s paid sick-leave ordinance comes too late for people affected by the coronavirus.

John Minchillo / AP

  On today's program: What we know right now about how Pittsburgh is preparing for COVID-19, and state health officials aren’t obligated to tell us much about who is infected; an author questions how long the American shale boom will last; BOOM Concepts urges young Pittsburghers to funnel their dreams into art; and the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre marks a historic debut performance.

Ben Filio for The Sprout Fund / Knotzland

On today's program: A Homewood-born bowtie company is getting love from celebrities and yinzers alike; how risk managers assess the coronavirus; what happened when a Puerto Rican family bought a home in an exclusionary neighborhood; and local teachers share how they talk to kids about racism.

Courtesy of Therese Rocco

 

On today's program: A new play explores the life and career of Pittsburgh’s first female assistant police chief; Pitt explains why PFAS chemicals are cause for worry; residents of a Philadelphia neighborhood are proud of their exclusionary reputation; and COVID-19 preparations continue in Pittsburgh.  

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

  

On today's program: Pittsburgh’s new NAACP director shares her vision for equitable community development; how refugees are affecting some American towns; and why some local libraries have eliminated late fees.

Documentary Featuring Tree Of Life Survivors Premieres Friday

Mar 5, 2020
Courtesy of "Viral: Antisemitism in Four Mutations"

On today's program: A new film looks at the rise of antisemitism; a proposal could drastically change long-standing protections for birds; City Council is starting over on a trust fund to support parks; and the PSO’s new Pops conductor imagines his first fall season. 

Andrea Pekelnicky / Courtesy of Carnegie Science Center

 

On today's program: The Carnegie Science Center names one of its own as permanent director; the broadband industry is in no hurry to fix PA’s rural internet problem; one advisor counsels patience after a shaky week for U.S. markets; and how Super Tuesday shapes the way Pittsburghers get to vote. 

Marc Levy / AP

On today's program: Three decades into the ADA, Pittsburgh still has a long way to go; how fracking could influence the 2020 election; a new book explores how grassroots organizing is upending the democratic process; and questions remain about whether Allegheny County is pursuing facial recognition technology. 

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: One lawmaker is urging Harrisburg to reconsider its definition of a health emergency; Pittsburgh is updating its pandemic plan; farmers say a new horse racing bill could do more than harm than good; and Sojourner House welcomes a new leader.

NIAID-RML / AP

On today's program: Allegheny County makes plans for a potential COVID-19 outbreak; why one climate scientist is breaking up with airplanes to decrease his carbon footprint; hear two sides of the debate about government health care; a barber offers political discourse with your monthly trim; an Erie-to-Pittsburgh bike trail could be coming soon; and competition is heating up ahead of the 2020 fish fry season. 

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: Wilkinsburg gets funding for new strategies to curb gun violence; some PA public schools are struggling to meet the needs of immigrant students; child life specialists in Lawrenceville give sick patients a new creative outlet; and an international boat club wants to get Pittsburghers on the water. 

Courtesy 412 Food Rescue

On today's program: How 412 Food Rescue hopes to expand in 2020; U.S. Steel settles the first in a series of pending class action lawsuits; Pennsylvania launches its own Conviction Integrity Unit; more turmoil for the Allegheny County Democratic Committee; and a look into the true cost of court debt.

Eric Gay / AP

On today's program: Rep. Jake Wheatley wants legalized weed to fund social programs, including record expungement; an update on a proposed low-to-no barrier homeless shelter on the Mon’s southern shore; a nursing program outside of Philly might be the best bang for your educational buck; the NAACP is calling for the permanent removal of an Allegheny County judge; and one of Pittsburgh’s busiest libraries is temporarily closing.

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

 

On today's program: The Catholic Diocese of Harrisburg becomes the state's first to file for bankruptcy; a court victory for a species of bat could protect them from extinction; and Central Outreach Wellness Center brings its unique medical care to Beaver County. 

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The nearly century-old former home of the YMCA in the Hill District is getting a new purpose; a look at what it’ll take to get Pittsburgh ready for 5G; state Attorney General Josh Shapiro goes after medicaid fraudsters and JUUL; and some local progressives aren’t happy with the county Democratic committee’s endorsements. 

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The Port of Pittsburgh needs more funding for repairs on all three city rivers; a cafe in Reading has become home to that community’s Latinx population; Allegheny County Council considers a police review board; and a touring collection of African American art lands at The Westmoreland. 

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: community residents have questions about big development in their neighborhoods; a jury has acquitted a man charged in connection with a 2016 mass shooting in Wilkinsburg; poverty has created a new type of swing voter; mild winters are bad news for ice fishers; and a Pittsburgh original makes a comeback to candy aisles. 

Change Agency

 

On today's program: Community advocate Betty Cruz joins the World Affairs Council; lessons from an Ohio cracker could inform how environmentalists see the Beaver County cracker; PA’s educator of the year is a North Hills history teacher; a local nonprofit collects donations to fight the coronavirus; and the Holocaust Center celebrates the local Jewish immigrant experience. 

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: The Allegheny County Executive and FBI Pittsburgh weigh in on local election security; the origin of two architectural marvels in Homewood and Larimer; a journalist recalls the forced migration of 2,000 minority residents nearly 100 years ago; and why firefly species could be in danger. 

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: How overwhelmingly white Pittsburgh media outlets cover black lives; day-to-day concerns of rural Americans aren’t being addressed in campaign stump speeches; the Wilkinsburg murder trial moves into deliberations; and VA Pittsburgh wants more veterans to try digital health care benefits.

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