Kiley Koscinski

Producer / Engineer, The Confluence
Mike Fabus / Pittsburgh Steelers

 

On today's program: Jim Rooney honors his father with a new tome; a local company brings dancers to the Hill District; community members gather to remember the 11 victims of the Tree of Life attack; Heinz is celebrating its 150th birthday; and a Pittsburgh-based refugee services program is going national. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

 


On this special report: One year ago today, 11 people were killed and five others wounded at the Tree of Life synagogue in Squirrel Hill. It remains the most deadly anti-Semitic attack on American soil. 90.5 WESA’s The Confluence presents a look back at the hurt and healing that has transpired since. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: Two journalists reflect on covering Pittsburgh’s Jewish community; some Tree of Life members are at odds with seeking the death penalty against the alleged gunman; police are still grappling with the trauma of responding to the scene of the attack; how a graphic design inspired unity in the city; and mourners organize events to bring members of the community back together. 

Kevin Gavin / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: City Councilman Daniel Lavelle opines on the future of the Hill District; a Heinz Award recipient is pushing back on stereotypes of African Americans; questions remain about the future of the Tree of Life building; the debate over policing and LGBTQ protections is playing out in races for Allegheny County Council; and an investigation reveals state lawmakers are spending campaign dollars on things like DNA tests and expensive wine. 

APOST

 

On today's program: One Carnegie Mellon University professor wants to democratize access to computer programming; Pittsburgh’s Jewish community is still healing after the Tree of Life attack; research has found some vaping products share the same toxic chemicals as traditional cigarettes; and local afterschool programs gear up for a celebration this week. 

Matt Rourke / AP

 On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto says the city remains united, but not much has changed about guns or violent crime in the one year since the attack at Tree of Life synagogue; and childhood obesity rates in Pennsylvania have climbed into the nation's top 10.

Courtesy of Sheri Fink / Washington and Jefferson College

On today's program: Author Sheri Fink tells Pittsburgh what it means to be prepared; a look at one free, community-based fitness program changing lives; the people and plans behind the URA’s latest deadline for the Civic Arena site; and how Friday’s 3rd Circuit Court ruling will affect protests outside abortion providers in Pittsburgh.

Sony Pictures

On today's program: The Pittsburgh Film Office is having to turn a lot of big productions away; Andy Warhol’s faith goes on display; the city is giving away its plants Downtown; and mental health treatment remains elusive for some defendants waiting to stand trial.  

32BJ SEIU

On today's program: Pennsylvania may consider allowing college athletes to get paid; encouraging natural gas development in the state could mean big changes at the DEP; a local man claims he lost a job after using medical marijuana; and unionized cleaners in Pittsburgh are fighting for better working conditions. 

Carolyn Kaster / AP

On today's program: Southwestern Pennsylvania is hiring a couple hundred plow truck drivers; the Steelers say Mexico is their biggest international market, but others are growing; Pittsburgh Opera is encouraging patrons to use their cell phone during shows; and Pittsburgh International warns catfishing for airline fees is much more common than you’d think.

Chatham University

On today's program: Chatham University celebrates decades of gender equity, entrepreneurship and political acumen; a 55-acre Philadelphia dump-turned-residential neighborhood is getting cleaned up; a look at the use of gag orders in criminal cases; and what to look for on election day in Allegheny County races.  

David Gilke / NPR

On today's program: Quil Lawrence is headed to Pittsburgh to share his experiences covering U.S. veterans; a public school teacher helps students get a second chance; Pennsylvania farmers are grappling with the impact of the trade war, which a Pitt political economist says was never a good plan; and a Revolutionary-era log house is being moved to historic Hanna’s Town. 

Courtest of Touchstone Center for Crafts

On today's program: Touchstone keeps traditional crafting alive in the Laurel Highlands; The Bellefield Tower is the last remnant of a community; Pittsburgh's three major sports teams are having a rough year; and the ACLU of Pennsylvania wants to throw out a state constitutional amendment referendum. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

On today's program: Pennsylvania could be the roadmap to handling gerrymandering in other states; new meat inspection rules could have implications for the safety of food and workers; a local school takes a new approach to teaching social studies; Pittsburghers consider a tax to pay for city parks improvements; and state police aren't collecting data about the race of those they pull over. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: More veterans are dying from suicide than on the battlefield; Crawford Grill could soon be a nationally recognized historic landmark; Pitt has appealed a renewed chance for its grad students to unionize; and there's a new database of addiction treatment and recovery resources across Pennsylvania.

Courtesy of John Van Hamersveld

On today's program: The man behind dozens of iconic 1960's album covers brings his art to Greensburg; Pennsylvania's first vaping-illness death is reported; a local doctor is testing out fixed prices for medical services instead of insurance; and the new SCOTUS term could result in dozens of landmark decisions on issues like abortion and gun control. 

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: A conversation with U.S. Attorney Scott Brady on what's next in the Tree of Life shooting trial; a Perry Hilltop organization gives students trade skills; Pennsylvania's has one of the highest freight trucking rates in the country; and Port Authority expounds on its next 20 years. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

On today's program: A new agency to support Tree of Life survivors opens its doors; a legal battle ensues (again) over prayer during House sessions; Pennsylvania's ethane is being used overseas; immunization exemptions could change after a measles outbreak; and it's your last chance to register to vote ahead of November's election. 

Courtesy of Stephen Chbosky / Grand Central Publishing

On today's program: Pittsburgh native and author Stephen Chbosky talks about his latest release ahead of a trip home; an expert weighs in on which Democratic hopefuls have the best plans to address climate change; how the PA Turnpike laid the groundwork for today's interstate highway system; and activists are putting pressure on a coke plant in Erie.

Andrew Harnik / AP

On today's program: Mayor Peduto returns from the world stage on climate action; robotics and AI are helping power a local agriculture company; Pittsburgh restaurants are helping restore the Chesapeake Bay; the state Supreme Court declines to abolish capital punishment in PA; and a reporter hopes to find tangible solutions to child poverty in the region. 

Courtesy of Riverlife

On today's program: Riverlife's new CEO says development is critical to riverfront protection; how federal refugee caps are affecting Pennsylvania's immigrants; why Jewish New Year celebrations are being celebrated at a Christian sanctuary; Sen. Bob Casey says Dems can't put progressive ideas ahead of actually winning the election; and the nation's first openly transgender swimmer on what it took to compete in the NCAA.

PennDOT

On today's program: John Fetterman says time is now for recreational marijuana in Pennsylvania; PennDOT is preparing to test autonomous cars in highway construction zones; and a preview of how libraries and librarians have had to adapt to keep up with changing technologies and expectations.

Provided by Arielle Evans / Courtesy of HundrED

On today's program: Pittsburgh education takes an international honor; apple growers face an unknown threat that's killing trees; school districts are debating allowing teachers to carry guns in classrooms; and a chance to check-in on your 2020 Democratic hopeful bingo card.

Sarah Boden / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Port Authority CEO Katharine Kelleman explains the latest adjustment to Pittsburgh's federal BRT application; legislation would mandate adult changing tables in public venues; and the United Steelworkers will represent 90 tech workers contracted with Google.

Grant Eldridge / Audubon Photography Awards

On today's program: New prison parole policies could follow in the wake of recent homicides; a deadly mosquito-born virus has moved into Pennsylvania; Open Doors Pittsburgh returns with new spaces and insider tours; and what locals can do to support disappearing migratory bird populations.

Marion Ettinger / Penguin Random House

On today's program: Author Sigrid Nunez breaks hearts with puppy love; an Oakland man insists mentorship has no retirement age; Pittsburgh's historic buildings were identified, but not protected; a peek at ALCOSAN's long-awaited sewege plan; and how the South Hills are recovering after a gargantuan water main break flooded multiple neighborhoods.

Evan Agostini / Invision/AP

On today's program: A former senior White House advisor is on her way to Pittsburgh; how recent headlines about Daylin Leach and Mike Folmer will affect the opening session of the Pennsylvania Senate; a federal policy shift could affect health outcomes for immigrant children; a veteran climate change activist says people should ask more from their governments; and how Pennsylvania students are (and aren't) taught about climate science.

Courtesy of Tree Pittsburgh

On today's program: Tree Pittsburgh looks to a giveaway to help the city's tree canopy; a philosopher tries to understand climate science deniers and change their minds; NPR's David Greene peeps the upcoming hockey season; how Pittsburgh isn’t preparing for potential climate migration; and a new immersive theatre project explores how AI affects modern life and whether humans have a say. 

Christy Bostardi

On today's program: A blues guitarist-turned-philosopher explains his unorthodox education; five prisoners write a book about life behind bars; how piano-making took root in Pittsburgh; and what to look for from Banned Books Week in Pittsburgh.

Courtesy of YouthPlaces

On today's program: A North Side nonprofit will host an after school program at the convention center; state lawmakers could consider changing Pennsylvania's life without parole sentencing structure; a check in with the Pittsburgh diocese a year after a salacious grand jury report; and the state House reconvenes today with an agenda that could include new work requirements for Medicaid recipients. 

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