Kiley Koscinski

Producer / Engineer, The Confluence
Carolyn Kaster / AP

On today’s program: The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership wants to study how downtown streets could be used in the future; a look back at Karen Hacker’s time at the Allegheny County Health Department; kids and adults with autism have a new place to relax at Pittsburgh International Airport; a fungus bugging cicadas has psychedelic properties; and how a federal proposal to change SNAP could affect Pennsylvanians.

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: Grounded works with community members to breathe life into abandoned lots; get to know Shawnee chieftess Nonhelema; changes in Pennsylvania Republican party leadership could impact its approach to the 2020 elections; and a conversation with holiday performers who celebrate Christmas all year round.

Courtesy of Lawrenceville United

On today’s program: A Pittsburgh journalist tells the stories of families wounded by the opioid crisis; a Hazelwood support group helps families of kids with autism; Pittsburgh prepares to honor slain Officer Calvin Hall; how Youngstown tracks health issues close to fracking sites; and a Lawrenceville nonprofit teaches residents about their housing rights.

Rodney Grubbs / NASA

On today’s program: Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy wants to cultivate a trust fund; citizen scientists are counting fireflies; formerly incarcerated residents confront redevelopment in Homewood; the Trump administration’s inaction on environmental issues could affect Lake Erie; a Penn State professor remembers witnessing the Apollo 11 launch; and a 1988 conversation with Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins.

Ebrahim Noroozi / AP

On today’s program: How an executive order regarding kidney disease is affecting Pittsburgh transplant programs; the dean of Pitt's School of Law and former SCOTUS clerk reflects on the legacy of Justice John Paul Stevens; what it takes to get formerly incarcerated men back to work in Homewood; Democratic state Sen. Jay Costa explains his next legislative priorities; and WESA remembers Allegheny County elections chief Mark Wolosik.

Courtesy of CemSites

On today's program: Medical marijuana will soon be used to treat anxiety, but not as a first resort; a local activist pushes shopping local during Amazon Prime Day; WESA explores the impact of crime and incarceration on Homewood; how a Perryopolis startup is modernizing cemetery management and commerce; and a new documentary weighs in on how humans interact with nature. 

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Phipps Conservatory keeps its plants in one of the world's most sustainable buildings; a local organization helps video game enthusiasts find community IRL; the legacy of redlining, segregation and the war on drugs in Homewood; and high school and college STEM students get an up-close look at research at UPMC Hillman Cancer Center. 

Marcus Charleston / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Fallingwater joins the ranks of Machu Picchu and Notre Dame; fewer than 5% of this year's Pittsburgh police recruits are black; a reporter studying the Thwaites Glacier tracks how it's melting; and a new book looks to answer questions about the future of Judaism in Pittsburgh after the Tree of Life massacre. 

Matt Rourke / AP

 

On today’s program: A 30-year Pitt study finds depression symptoms are decreasing in Pittsburgh's youngest seniors; President Trump replaces the Clean Power Plan; a Penn Hills senior housing community is struggling with mold; operas composed by Mr. Rogers are set to premiere in Shadyside; and family members of mentally ill individuals refusing treatment are at a legal stand-still.

Michael Santiago / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On today’s program: The Post-Gazette explores the ways child poverty affects Western Pennsylvania communities; how Anthrocon and its larger furry community can help people with autism; and the latest from Harrisburg over plans to pay for new, more secure voting machines in time for 2020. 

Whiskey Rebellion Festival

On today’s program: How to celebrate the 225th anniversary of Western PA's whiskey rebellion; how much parking revenue has the city lost to bike lanes; a new building at Millersville University touts energy efficiency; a local musician creates space for fellow Brazilians to perform; and new state reforms aim to protect victims of campus sexual assault. 

University of Pittsburgh

On today’s program: Pitt's jazz studies program has a new leader with lots of big ideas; Larimer's African Healing Garden makes its home in an empty lot; Ohio residents are fighting companies over the fate of fracking waste; residents in Bucks and Montgomery counties are battling contamination in private wells; and the Voter Participation Center is campaigning to get more Pennsylvanians to vote.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: The United Way of Southwestern PA gets new leadership; an improv comedy group helps people with Down Syndrome; Retire Your Unserviceable Old Glory honors torn, tattered or faded American flags; and everything you need to know about local politics headed into Independence Day. *The Confluence will return after the holiday on Monday, July 8.

Illustration by Christina Lee, text and data by Oliver Morrison / PublicSource

On today’s program: An update on the MRSA outbreak at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh; the director of physician services at Gateway Rehab discusses last year’s drop in fatal opioid overdoses; a deep dive on the pros and cons of ozone; and how low-wage jobs compound challenges for Pennsylvania workers.

UPMC Childrens’ MRSA Outbreak infects patients and staff 
(0:00 – 05:44)

Courtesty of P3R

On today’s program: A new look, leader and vision for the group behind Pittsburgh's marathon; Kitchen of Grace provides a place for teens to gain tools for future employment; landowners go up against energy companies in Ohio; questions in Harrisburg over a tax break for those who give scholarships to private schools; and the Supreme Court wraps up its term with a series of tight rulings.

Courtesy of The Heinz History Center

On today's program: A conversation with the oldest living African American olympic medalist and Pittsburgher Herb Douglas; the Pennsylvania Department of Health says there's no cancer cluster in Washington County, but questions about the rate of rare tumors there remain; Roger Humphries is bringing jazz music to Pittsburgh's rivers; and Pennsylvania could soon join a list of states in requiring paid family leave. 

Carnegie Mellon University

On today’s program: A conversation with a pioneer of the space art movement about the first museum on the moon; Pennsylvania rivers get a second life as recreation hubs; the commonwealth's clean slate law gives second chances; researchers at Magee-Womens Research Institute are developing a new mesh for pelvic prolapse; and a sneak peek of WYEP Summer Music Fest.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today’s program: Artworks by artists of color open in a new exhibition Saturday; Carnegie library workers take steps in unionize; and a debate between the ACLU of Pennsylvania and the Center for Victims about Marsy’s Law.  

Ariel Worthy / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: What the new UPMC and Highmark agreement means for patients; a Pittsburgh author releases his debut novel; Aliquippa is using a federal grant to improve access to fresh food downtown; and a terrorism expert explores how counter-terrorism has evolved. 

Library of Congress

On today’s program: Voting access still has a long way to go, 100 years after PA ratified women's suffrage; Pennsylvanians spend big on the lottery; SETpoint provides self-defense training for people at risk of gender-based violence; fracking in Ohio brings money and complications; and Pittsburgh considers microtransit partnerships.

Courtesy of Endemol Shine North America

On today's program: The man accused of plotting to attack a church on the North Side is due in court; MasterChef contestant and Pittsburgher Michael Silverstein draws culinary inspiration from the Strip District; East Pittsburgh has undergone a number of changes in the year since the death of Antwon Rose; Why are a number of Pittsburgh's roads referred to as runs?; plus a look inside Pitt’s newest nationality room celebrating Philippine culture.

Courtesy of the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation

On today’s program: How to keep your house from making you sick; conservationists are working to save bats from wind turbines; AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka talks trade tariffs; and the surprising history of Pittsburgh's Skinny Building.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: Pittsburgh Public Schools superintendent Anthony Hamlet talks about district transformation and his take on a contraversial trip to Cuba; DNA testing kits illuminate lost branches of family trees, but may not tell the full story; and one year after his death, Antwon Rose II’s classmates remember him, followed by a conversation about community healing and changes in policy and policing.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: The Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival is bringing Patti LaBelle, Makaya McCraven and a stacked lineup of jazz and funk musicians to town; a PA House bill could expand insurance coverage for treating Lyme disease; local poet and founder of the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange Michael Wurster publishes his fourth anthology; and PWSA explains how existing programs can help low-income residents pay their water bills.

Courtesy of Debbie Reynolds / Twitter

On today’s program: A Baldwin-Whitehall middle school teacher is working with the U.S. Navy to establish STEM education standards; a Pittsburgh businessman is paying it forward by mentoring young people in his community; a Pitt professor is looking beyond grocery store shelves to find ways to eat ethically; and a new group of science writers is building a bridge between shrinking newsrooms and telling science stories.

Richard Shotwell / Invision / AP

NBC's "Late Night" host and former SNL head writer and cast member Seth Meyers didn't grow up in Pittsburgh, but his dad did. He says his father's pride in the city was something he inherited and one of the reasons he considers Pittsburgh his ancestral home. 

Meyers returns to those roots Friday night to play two back-to-back shows at the Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead. He jokes that this is the one stop of his tour where he can correctly pronounce the neighborhood "S'Liberty" to an audience who will understand. 

Carolyn Kaster / AP

On today’s program: Pride month celebrations kick off in Pittsburgh this weekend; the Mattress Factory art museum tries to find its footing after sexual misconduct allegations rocked its staff last year; PA motorists are nearly three times as likely to die on rural roads than the rest of the nation; a look at what happened in the primary elections and other political news; and the Three Rivers Arts Festival begins Downtown tonight.

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum commemorates the 75th anniversary of D-Day in a special exhibition; Allegheny County is enlisting volunteers to report of the welfare of area bees; WITF’s Tim Lambert uncovers two Butler County soldiers behind an iconic WWII photo; and a 94-year-old former Army medic recounts his time on Omaha Beach.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

On today’s program: City officials want public input on autonomous vehicles; Yuengling celebrates nearly two centuries employing generations of Pottsville families; the National Council of Jewish Women is talking about how to get more voters to the polls; and after a gag order was lifted, details of a fracking settlement have been made public. 

Jessica Kourkounis / AP

On today's program: Potential solutions to Pennsylvania's growing pension crisis; former mined lands are being converted into forests; and how preventive medicine can inform a diagnosis before disease takes root. 

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