Kiley Koscinski

General Assignment Reporter

Kiley Koscinski is a reporter for 90.5 WESA. She reports on breaking stories from a variety of realms in Pittsburgh; with specific interest in the growing technology sector.

 

She has previously produced Morning Edition and The Confluence for 90.5 WESA. Before that she worked as a producer and assignment desk editor at NewsRadio 1020 KDKA. Kiley attended Point Park University and was the Music Director of the student-run radio station, WPPJ.

 

Kiley is deeply interested in the oddities of Pittsburgh and the communities that make up the city’s underbelly. Stories and tips can be sent to kkoscinski@wesa.fm

Jessica Kourkounis / AP

 


On today's program: A physicians group asks for protections against malpractice lawsuits; a look at who has the legal authority to reopen the government; and a string of middlemen, including a Pittsburgh businessman, were duped by one of the largest scams of the pandemic. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 

On today's program: A market research firm polls locals about how they’re dealing during the pandemic; Pittsburgh’s foundation community pledges millions in relief aid; residential child care centers weigh the consequences of staying open; and why the state’s largest school districts are still struggling to start online learning.

John Minchillo / AP

 

On today's program: Coroners say they can help officials get an accurate count of COVID-19 victims; how federal prisoners are faring since local courts expedited the release of some jail inmates; and Port Authority urges people to stay home despite the financial hit. 

John Minchillo / AP

On today's program: Pittsburgh scientists apply nimble rules to the coronavirus treatment testing process; how some PA manufacturers are adapting to make protective equipment, with and without government approval; Meals on Wheels continues with new best practices during the pandemic; and an update on the long-awaited Mon-Oakland Connector plan.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: Pittsburgh Public Schools begins distributing more tech for at-home instruction; Gov. Tom Wolf faces legislative and legal pressure over what it means to be essential; and how the pandemic and its accompanying isolation is affecting people with substance use disorder.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Local farmers might be benefitting from the demand for home-delivered fresh produce; the state liquor control board is struggling to keep up with online liquor sales; and before railroads carried goods through Pittsburgh, canals did the job. 

Google

 

On today's program: PA’s attorney general is urging banks to voluntarily grant their customers grace periods; worries grow about health care inequity during the coronavirus outbreak; and most Americans seem to agree about a slow approach to reopening the economy.  

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: Diapers remain in short supply for some Western PA parents; CMU’s virtual tip jar already boasts 6,000 names; scientists worry that poor air quality could make the Pittsburgh region more susceptible to coronavirus; and without reliable internet, rural school districts are struggling to provide equitable education.

 


On today's program: A Murrysville company says it’s under “no moral obligation” to produce taxpayer-funded ventilators faster because of the pandemic; how domestic abuse shelters are adapting during the outbreak; and with their storefronts closed, local bookshop owners share fears and strategies for survival.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: What to expect when venturing into city parks; 911 centers will know if they’re responding to COVID-19 patients; and scientists need help from amateur researchers.

Courtesy of Coston Funeral Home

While the number of Pennsylvanians who have died from COVID-19 continues to climb, families who have lost loved ones to the pandemic -- and to other causes -- are trying to figure out what mourning rituals look like during a period of social distancing.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: How COVID-19 is affecting media outlets in Pittsburgh; funerals are evolving to allow for social distancing; and what newly greening plants can teach us about climate change.

Mark Nootbaar / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: How the nation’s $2 trillion stimulus package could land in Pittsburgh; what we know so far about PA’s record number of unemployment claims; and how home health workers are trying to stay safe during the pandemic.

On today's program: Pittsburgh's mayor says it will be weeks before local coronavirus cases peak; residents ask whether the government should direct more resources to people struggling during the pandemic; and a look at how local arts groups are coping with widespread shutdowns.

Gensler + HDR in association with luis vidal + architects / Allegheny County Airport Authority

 


On today's program: Protecting people from the outbreak could have dire consequences for those sheltering in place with an abuser; and PIT will wait for a less volatile stock market to break ground on its $1.1 billion terminal project.

Courtesy of Northside Common Ministries

On today's program: How one homeless shelter is coping during the pandemic; why UPMC says elective procedures should proceed, even as resources remain tight; and farmers are declared life-sustaining, but it’s unclear where they can sell their food.

Courtesy 412 Food Rescue

 

On today's program: How a local food waste prevention group is adapting to social distancing; scammers are capitalizing on the coronavirus outbreak; and advice from child psychologists about explaining COVID-19 to children.  

Carolyn Kaster / AP

On today's program: The state prison system grapples with social distancing for staff and inmates; a look at our region’s health care system and its readiness to take on more sick people; and PA is creeping closer to its new mail-in voting deadline.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: How the state accelerated Pittsburgh Public Schools’ plan to close; why some hospital workers worry they don’t have enough protective gear; what the U.S. Census is doing to mitigate exposure to COVID-19; and a peek into the decision-making process behind public restrictions in Allegheny County.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: A look at the latest stories from the WESA newsroom about the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact locally; residential water wells in Pennsylvania are not monitored for potentially dangerous bacteria; a reporter lists the top power players in Harrisburg; and Pittsburgh’s paid sick-leave ordinance comes too late for people affected by the coronavirus.

John Minchillo / AP

  On today's program: What we know right now about how Pittsburgh is preparing for COVID-19, and state health officials aren’t obligated to tell us much about who is infected; an author questions how long the American shale boom will last; BOOM Concepts urges young Pittsburghers to funnel their dreams into art; and the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre marks a historic debut performance.

Ben Filio for The Sprout Fund / Knotzland

On today's program: A Homewood-born bowtie company is getting love from celebrities and yinzers alike; how risk managers assess the coronavirus; what happened when a Puerto Rican family bought a home in an exclusionary neighborhood; and local teachers share how they talk to kids about racism.

Courtesy of Therese Rocco

 

On today's program: A new play explores the life and career of Pittsburgh’s first female assistant police chief; Pitt explains why PFAS chemicals are cause for worry; residents of a Philadelphia neighborhood are proud of their exclusionary reputation; and COVID-19 preparations continue in Pittsburgh.  

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

  

On today's program: Pittsburgh’s new NAACP director shares her vision for equitable community development; how refugees are affecting some American towns; and why some local libraries have eliminated late fees.

Andrea Pekelnicky / Courtesy of Carnegie Science Center

 

On today's program: The Carnegie Science Center names one of its own as permanent director; the broadband industry is in no hurry to fix PA’s rural internet problem; one advisor counsels patience after a shaky week for U.S. markets; and how Super Tuesday shapes the way Pittsburghers get to vote. 

Marc Levy / AP

On today's program: Three decades into the ADA, Pittsburgh still has a long way to go; how fracking could influence the 2020 election; a new book explores how grassroots organizing is upending the democratic process; and questions remain about whether Allegheny County is pursuing facial recognition technology. 

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: One lawmaker is urging Harrisburg to reconsider its definition of a health emergency; Pittsburgh is updating its pandemic plan; farmers say a new horse racing bill could do more than harm than good; and Sojourner House welcomes a new leader.

NIAID-RML / AP

On today's program: Allegheny County makes plans for a potential COVID-19 outbreak; why one climate scientist is breaking up with airplanes to decrease his carbon footprint; hear two sides of the debate about government health care; a barber offers political discourse with your monthly trim; an Erie-to-Pittsburgh bike trail could be coming soon; and competition is heating up ahead of the 2020 fish fry season. 

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: Wilkinsburg gets funding for new strategies to curb gun violence; some PA public schools are struggling to meet the needs of immigrant students; child life specialists in Lawrenceville give sick patients a new creative outlet; and an international boat club wants to get Pittsburghers on the water. 

Courtesy 412 Food Rescue

On today's program: How 412 Food Rescue hopes to expand in 2020; U.S. Steel settles the first in a series of pending class action lawsuits; Pennsylvania launches its own Conviction Integrity Unit; more turmoil for the Allegheny County Democratic Committee; and a look into the true cost of court debt.

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