Kiley Koscinski

General Assignment Reporter

Kiley Koscinski is a reporter for 90.5 WESA. She reports on breaking stories from a variety of realms in Pittsburgh; with specific interest in the growing technology sector.

 

She has previously produced Morning Edition and The Confluence for 90.5 WESA. Before that she worked as a producer and assignment desk editor at NewsRadio 1020 KDKA. Kiley attended Point Park University and was the Music Director of the student-run radio station, WPPJ.

 

Kiley is deeply interested in the oddities of Pittsburgh and the communities that make up the city’s underbelly. Stories and tips can be sent to kkoscinski@wesa.fm

Eric Gay / AP

On today's program: Rep. Jake Wheatley wants legalized weed to fund social programs, including record expungement; an update on a proposed low-to-no barrier homeless shelter on the Mon’s southern shore; a nursing program outside of Philly might be the best bang for your educational buck; the NAACP is calling for the permanent removal of an Allegheny County judge; and one of Pittsburgh’s busiest libraries is temporarily closing.

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

 

On today's program: The Catholic Diocese of Harrisburg becomes the state's first to file for bankruptcy; a court victory for a species of bat could protect them from extinction; and Central Outreach Wellness Center brings its unique medical care to Beaver County. 

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The nearly century-old former home of the YMCA in the Hill District is getting a new purpose; a look at what it’ll take to get Pittsburgh ready for 5G; state Attorney General Josh Shapiro goes after medicaid fraudsters and JUUL; and some local progressives aren’t happy with the county Democratic committee’s endorsements. 

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The Port of Pittsburgh needs more funding for repairs on all three city rivers; a cafe in Reading has become home to that community’s Latinx population; Allegheny County Council considers a police review board; and a touring collection of African American art lands at The Westmoreland. 

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: community residents have questions about big development in their neighborhoods; a jury has acquitted a man charged in connection with a 2016 mass shooting in Wilkinsburg; poverty has created a new type of swing voter; mild winters are bad news for ice fishers; and a Pittsburgh original makes a comeback to candy aisles. 

Change Agency

 

On today's program: Community advocate Betty Cruz joins the World Affairs Council; lessons from an Ohio cracker could inform how environmentalists see the Beaver County cracker; PA’s educator of the year is a North Hills history teacher; a local nonprofit collects donations to fight the coronavirus; and the Holocaust Center celebrates the local Jewish immigrant experience. 

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: The Allegheny County Executive and FBI Pittsburgh weigh in on local election security; the origin of two architectural marvels in Homewood and Larimer; a journalist recalls the forced migration of 2,000 minority residents nearly 100 years ago; and why firefly species could be in danger. 

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: How overwhelmingly white Pittsburgh media outlets cover black lives; day-to-day concerns of rural Americans aren’t being addressed in campaign stump speeches; the Wilkinsburg murder trial moves into deliberations; and VA Pittsburgh wants more veterans to try digital health care benefits.

Courtesy of Barbara Burstin

On today's program: A celebration of the life and big personality of the late Sophie Masloff; how ‘cancel culture’ is affecting two Trump voters in Schuylkill County; what to expect when Pittsburgh police make their 2020 'Cops' debut tonight; and how the Carnegie Science Center adapts its programming for people on the Autism spectrum. 

Richard D. Kelly / Pittsburgh Cultural Trust

 

On today's program: A festival hopes to spark a lifelong love of reading; how rain contributes to barge accidents in the Ohio River watershed; flu season is still upon us, but the state and local data are confusing; a rock icon is staging a collaboration with Pittsburgh’s Mendelssohn Choir; dinosaurs are taking over the convention center this weekend; and what to expect from 90.5 WESA’s latest podcast. 

Patrick Semansky / AP

 

On today's program: What Pennsylvanians should know after the State of the Union; one local business thrives in the film economy; takeaways from Gov. Tom Wolf’s 2021 budget, and how Republicans are reacting; and a remembrance of TV personality Quentin Crisp. 

Ryan Collerd / Pew Center for Arts & Heritage via Point Park University

 

On today's program: Point Park University celebrates black dancers; Gov. Wolf’s ambitious carbon goals don’t really square up with pushing for a boom in petrochemicals; agriculture is a major industry in Pennsylvania, but it faces serious challenges; and Airbnb is changing the hospitality game in Pittsburgh.

UPMC Enterprises

On today's program: What UPMC wants from its $1 billion life sciences investment; why small dams are a problem in the Ohio watershed; opening arguments begin in the Wilkinsburg mass shooting trial; and new data details jobs lost to the U.S.-China trade deficit. 

Gary Yon / Courtesy of Junior Achievement of Western Pennsylvania

 

On today's program: Paid family leave in PA gets a committee hearing; county leaders weigh in on a decade of questionable air quality; UPMC may leverage investments in drugmakers into a whole new company; a mentorship program exposes kids to real-life careers; and PWSA is taking a state loan to upgrade its infrastructure. 

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The medical community is amending its thoughts on when and how new moms should be cared for; Doors Open Pittsburgh explores the city’s African American history; an expanding program teaches locals how to care for their environment. 

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: FBI Pittsburgh hopes to apply the cyber security lessons of 2016 to 2020; the U.S. Census Bureau needs many more numerators ahead of this year’s count; a Point Park initiative goes beyond basic survival needs for the city’s homeless; and Philadelphia honors native son Kobe Bryant after the basketball star’s tragic death. 

Michael Drazdzinski / The University of Pittsburgh

 

On today's program: GOP leadership is changing in Harrisburg; some U.S. waterways might lose federal protection; a new report reveals companies did not report hospitalizations of those with intellectual disabilities; and Pitt’s Department of Africana Studies celebrates 50 years. 

Andrew Harnik / AP

 

On today's program: A White House correspondent shares tales from the road; what we’ve learned from five years of local coal mining data; a sportsbook expert estimates just how involved Pennsylvanians will be ahead of Super Bowl LIV; and how Pittsburgh plans to celebrate the Chinese New Year as the threat of disease plagues provinces abroad.

Matt Rourke / AP

 


On today's program: Efforts to crack down on sexual harassment in state government have stalled; a local incubator is supporting Hispanic businesses; student reporters investigate barriers to unionization at Pitt; rural hospitals are at risk of closing; and with the rules finalized, the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump is set to begin. 

Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences / Carnegie Mellon University

On today's program: Students share how poetry gives voice to their experiences; PA voters get introspective about their media diets; what it takes to cut energy use in state-owned buildings; and a new memoir explores the taboo subject of abuse in queer relationships.

John Locher / AP

 

On today's program: How President Trump’s trade deal could affect PA; cyber security experts are looking for protection from Iranian attacks; a proposed EPA rule could limit public policy materials; APM’s Molly Wood talks about Pittsburgh’s shot as a tech hub; and a local exhibit explores Andy Warhol's complex relationship with Catholicism.

Courtesy of Covestro

 

On today's program: Covestro expands its local presence and testing safer hockey equipment; PennDOT will soon enforce speed limits in construction zones; and a dedicated jazz club finds its footing in Pittsburgh. 

Michael Drazdzinski / The University of Pittsburgh / Anthem Press


    

On today's program: The longtime head of the Delta Foundation has stepped down; New Light Congregation makes a decision about its future; a new book looks at how police-community relations have evolved a decade since the Jordan Miles case; and it’s too early to call, but the Penguins could be eyeing another Stanley Cup run. 

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: Pittsburgh’s Council on American-Islamic Relations has named a new leader; special education advocates say the state isn’t keeping up with the cost of services; FamilyLinks considers how to spend a $1 million grant to prevent homelessness; Mayor Peduto comments on Pittsburgh’s declining black population; and the Clairton community decides whether it wants to participate in a settlement with U.S. Steel. 

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

 

On today's program: PennDOT previews a full year of construction on Western PA roadways; aging infrastructure is putting river communities at risk of increased flooding; what it means to be "radically" body positive; a fond farewell to City Councilor Darlene Harris; and a local professor updates our understanding of Mars' topography.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Meet the PSO’s new principal pops conductor; a look back at 2020’s potential biggest business story; why a judge would bar reporters from the courtroom in a capital murder case; a new book explores the business of immortality; and how residents are affected when their neighborhood becomes a hotbed for development.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto on the year ahead and a new City Council; an effort to help gun owners surrender their weapons in times of crisis; local television stations reach a deal with cable providers; American Chestnut trees could make a comeback; and how to recycle your Christmas tree. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

 


On today's program: Gov. Tom Wolf discusses the odds of a minimum wage hike in Pennsylvania; a local woman empowers her neighbors in the "forgotten" West End; and advocates are hoping a change in state law could restore thousands of suspended or revoked drivers licenses. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

On today's program: It’s been a year of incremental progress in Pittsburgh. WESA staffers discuss it all, from a shakeup in the U.S. House and changes to the state justice system to ongoing concerns surrounding air quality, public school finances, major development projects, mayoral priorities and the state of local cultural institutions.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 

On today's program: the author of a new book chronicling the history of the Association of Pittsburgh Priests; banking in the marijuana industry is tricky business; the local impact of proposed food stamps changes; and how racism can have a negative impact on health. 

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