Lucy Perkins

Reporter

Lucy Perkins is a reporter/producer for 90.5 WESA’s Government and Accountability team. Before joining the 90.5 WESA newsroom, Lucy was an NPR producer in Washington, D.C., working on news programs like All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. She also helped produce the Hidden Brain podcast and NPR’s 2016 election night special coverage. Lucy joined NPR as a Kroc fellow after interning with Michigan Radio. Lucy is a proud Midwesterner, from the tip of Michigan’s pinky finger.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

The Allegheny County Elections Division is starting to look at how to improve its procedures ahead of the November election, but some voting rights activists say decisions need to be made as soon as possible.

Jared Murphy and Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

As protests against police brutality sweep across the country, polling suggests most Americans support law-enforcement reform. In our year-long Split Ticket series, we’ve been asking four voters about the issues that could sway their decision at the ballot box. This month, the many reported acts of police brutality – and the President’s response to them – have deepened one voter’s commitment to be heard in November.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Senate Democrats in Washington blocked a Republican attempt at police reform Wednesday, saying it did not mandate actual change.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

The Allegheny County Board of Elections met Monday morning to review how the county handled the June primary -- an election that took place amid the unprecedented circumstances of a pandemic, a new mail-in voting law and voter turnout that was twice as high as expected. But while Democrats and Republican board members said the overall process was smooth, both sides saw areas for significant improvement.

Screengrab of House Judiciary Hearing via YouTube

As the House Judiciary Committee considered police reform legislation Wednesday, U.S. Rep. Guy Reschenthaler spoke out against defunding police departments -- and quickly received a correction from a Democratic colleague who wrote the bill being discussed. An amendment he proposed calling for an investigation of the "antifa" movement also went over poorly. 

Shantale Davis

An attorney for one of the black journalists at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, who the paper barred from covering police brutality protests after claiming she was biased, filed a federal civil lawsuit against the paper Tuesday morning.

Facebook Live screengrab

Two faith leaders of prominent congregations that have been rocked by mass shootings came together Wednesday night to talk about how to fight racist and hateful attacks, as protests against police violence and systemic racism continue across the country.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Reporters at the Pittsburgh-Post Gazette said the company racially discriminated against staffers, after management at the paper removed two black journalists from covering issues related to police brutality, and called upon advertisers to pressure the paper on their behalf.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

An African American reporter at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has been barred from covering protests against the police killing of George Floyd, following her viral tweet comparing protest-related looting to the aftermath of a Kenny Chesney concert.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

The votes are in – most of them, anyway – and in Allegheny County, there were at least two big groups of winners on Election Day: female candidates, and the elections workers themselves.

Jared Murphy and Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

Reopening the economy has become a polarizing issue, and how elected leaders handle the task could sway voters’ decisions at the ballot box in November. For our Split Ticket series, we asked four western Pennsylvania voters about how they view reopening strategies.

Matt Rourke / AP

Allegheny County elections officials spent Tuesday night and the early hours of Wednesday morning churning through hundreds of thousands of ballots for the primary election. Election officials called it a night around 2:30 a.m., having tallied more than 263,000 ballots, with more to go.

Matt Rourke / AP

Less than two weeks before the primary, Pennsylvania House Republicans are asking the state to reverse its approval of Allegheny County’s limited in-person voting plan, saying it will create long lines at polls and disenfranchise voters.

Photos courtesy of the candidates / 90.5 WESA

Republican Mike Turzai represented the 28th state house District for nearly two decades before announcing his plans to retire at the end of this year. None of the three Republicans vying for his North Hills seat would have the same legislative clout as Turzai, the outgoing Speaker of the House. But they still believe they can help guide the state through the coronavirus pandemic.

Dickinson campaign/AP

Democrats Mike Doyle and Jerry Dickinson faced off Wednesday evening in what quickly became a heated debate, as the Congressional candidates sparred over racial inequality in Pittsburgh, and traded barbs over who was more progressive.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

In its last public meeting before the June 2 primary, the Allegheny County Board of Elections met Tuesday to run through final details and plans for the upcoming election, which could lead to higher-than-normal turnout despite the threat of a global pandemic.

90.5 WESA

The Allegheny County Elections Division has been sending vote-by-mail applications to every registered voter in the county ahead of the June 2 primary, but those applications may not reach every voting bloc.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

Elections wouldn’t happen without poll workers, and as Allegheny County prepares to carry out the June 2 primary amid the coronavirus pandemic, officials have been reckoning with whether they’ll have enough people to staff every polling place. 

Matt Rourke / AP

Pennsylvania House Republicans  -- including one from Allegheny County -- are calling on every district attorney in the state to intervene on behalf of business owners who want to reopen in counties where Gov. Tom Wolf’s business closures are still in place.

Krishnamoorthi's office

As the U.S. races to produce protective and medical equipment to combat the coronavirus, a western Pennsylvania company that makes ventilators has come under scrutiny – and now faces a Congressional investigation – for its potential role in the shortage. 

Matt Nemeth / 90.5 WESA

The NAACP of Pittsburgh says it was "disheartened" that U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle said he couldn't attend a debate with Democratic challenger Jerry Dickinson -- though on Thursday Doyle appeared to change his ground by saying he might be able to appear after all.

 

Dickinson campaign

The Democrat challenging U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle in the June 2 primary condemned the incumbent’s decision to turn down a debate proposed by the Pittsburgh NAACP, saying it shows Doyle is not willing to address issues important to the black community.

Jared Murphy and Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

During the first few months of this year, the 2020 presidential race dominated the country’s attention – until the coronavirus arrived. 

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

Thanks to the coronavirus, voting in Allegheny County will look very different this June. The Board of Elections voted Thursday to reduce the number of polling places from more than 1,300 to less than 200, to try and limit the spread of the coronavirus by encouraging residents to vote by mail, rather than in person.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

Western Pennsylvania's three incubment Congressional representatives have easily out-fundraised their rivals this year, according to new campaign finance reports.

Matt Rourke / AP

More Pennsylvanians will likely need help paying for groceries as the economy remains shutdown due to the coronavirus. But as the pandemic pokes holes in social safety net programs, there are new obstacles for food stamps recipients.

Dickinson campaign/AP

In the run-up to the 2020 election, Democrats struggled to pick the national face of the party: a more moderate candidate in Joe Biden or a more radical choice in Bernie Sanders. 

AP

New documents released Thursday show the Federal Emergency Management Agency only fulfilled only a fraction of requests for equipment to fight the coronavirus, leaving states like Pennsylvania short hundreds of thousands of items needed to protect healthcare providers and others.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

Gov. Tom Wolf has issued stay-at-home orders across Pennsylvania as the coronavirus spreads. The directives are meant to save lives, but for victims of domestic violence, being stuck at home with their abusers can be extremely dangerous.


90.5 WESA

To avoid going out in public, many are turning to online ordering and delivery for basic necessities like groceries. But the coronavirus has created obstacles for many who rely on food stamps. In many states  people who receive benefits through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are not allowed to use their benefits to order groceries online and have them delivered.

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