Lucy Perkins

Reporter

Lucy Perkins is a reporter/producer for 90.5 WESA’s Government and Accountability team. Before joining the 90.5 WESA newsroom, Lucy was an NPR producer in Washington, D.C., working on news programs like All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. She also helped produce the Hidden Brain podcast and NPR’s 2016 election night special coverage. Lucy joined NPR as a Kroc fellow after interning with Michigan Radio. Lucy is a proud Midwesterner, from the tip of Michigan’s pinky finger.

Courtesy of Mercuri and Skopov campaigns

For the last 20 years, the North Hills suburbs were represented in the state House by conservative champion Mike Turzai. Now that the former House speaker has resigned, there’s a chance for a major shift in representation for a district where demographics are already changing.


Carrie Antlfinger / AP

To accommodate an enormous influx of mail ballots in a highly contested presidential election year, the Allegheny County Board of Elections voted unanimously Thursday to expand voting options, and officials updated the public on other plans to expand the county's ability to count ballots in November.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

In a public letter published last week, four former PublicSource journalists described alleged mistreatment while they worked at the Pittsburgh news organization. 

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

For years, the Democratic Party has struggled to retain support from Catholic voters in southwestern Pennsylvania, and it will likely be hard for Democrats to reverse that trend in November – even with a ticket led by a Catholic presidential nominee.  


Keith Srakocic / AP

In a county where the local unemployment rate is twice the national average, Vice President Mike Pence touted the Trump administration's economic record before the pandemic at a Workers for Trump rally on Wednesday.

AP

In his first visit to Pittsburgh since the coronavirus pandemic hit, Democratic Presidential candidate Joe Biden asked a simple question: “Do you feel safe in Donald Trump’s America?” While Biden denounced the violence that has marked some protests nationwide this summer, he also blamed President Donald Trump for fomenting, and seeking political advantage from, crises afflicting the country.

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

Usually, college campuses are fertile ground for voter registration groups, teeming with young people who have never voted before. But as colleges and universities bring students back during the pandemic, activists have found themselves trying to navigate COVID-19 protocols just a few months before the 2020 election.

Jared Murphy and Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

Gun sales and gun violence have increased during the coronavirus pandemic, but the issue has been largely absent from the 2020 campaign. For WESA’s Split Ticket series, we’re following four Western Pennsylvania voters for a year, asking them about the issues that could sway their decision at the ballot box.

This month, they weighed in on firearms. But while they shared common ground on some changes to gun laws, the gun debate is still divisive.

Matt Rourke / AP

Allegheny County started sending applications for mail-in ballots to every registered voter in the county this week. Officials recommend applying for the ballot as soon as you get your application, and filling out and returning mail ballots well before Election Day. 

screen grab / YouTube

Western Pennsylvania Republican Sean Parnell was given a primetime spot to address the Republican National convention Monday night. 

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

Recent revelations that the U.S. Postal Service will likely struggle to deliver mail-in ballots in time for Election Day has worried voters, campaigns and election officials across the U.S. But the stakes feel particularly high in battleground states like Pennsylvania -- and with less than three months until November, election officials are trying to address mail delivery problems and voter fears.


Michelle R. Smith / AP

After the U.S. Census Bureau announced in early August that it moved up the deadline to complete the 2020 count, advocates and Census workers in Allegheny County have been scrambling to meet the new timetable.

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The pandemic has created plenty of questions about voting logistics ahead of the November election, but a voting rights group is using data to take some of the guesswork out of election day.


Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy announced Tuesday that he would suspend operational changes to the U.S. Postal Service that many feared would impact the general election. But a Pittsburgh representative for postal workers said employees worry that the politicized debate over voting by mail and funding for the postal service may have already impacted the public’s view of the institution.

Carrie Antlfinger / AP

The Pennsylvania Department of State asked the state Supreme Court on Thursday to extend the deadline to receive mail ballots in the November election by three days – from 8 p.m. on Election Day to the Friday following the election. If granted, the request would likely expand the number of eligible ballots cast in a state Donald Trump won in 2016 by very slim margins.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Union members at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette voted overwhelmingly to go on strike Monday after years of stalled contract negotiations and multiple complaints of labor law violations by Block Communications Inc., the company that owns the newspaper. The announcement to strike was accompanied by strong words for the employer.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

With less than three months before the election, Pennsylvania elections officials were hit with another voting lawsuit Friday. This one alleges that thousands of votes could be discarded if mail-in ballot procedures aren’t changed.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Vice President Mike Pence made a campaign stop outside the Greensburg Police station in Westmoreland County Thursday, to stand with law enforcement and denounce those who are calling to defund police departments.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

On Wednesday, union members at the Pittsburgh Post Gazette said they would decide whether to approve a strike. More than 120 members of the Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh will cast secret ballots by mail in the coming days to decide whether the newsroom employees should strike.

Jared Murphy and Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

This month, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden unveiled a sweeping green energy plan. It marks a strong contrast from President Donald Trump, who has long championed fossil fuels.


Matt Rourke / AP

U.S. Sen. Bob Casey says more resources are needed to fight the spread of the coronavirus among aging people of color, as numbers show COVID-19 is disproportionately hurting Black and Latino communities.

Screengrab of Fox News via Youtube

Republican Sean Parnell outraised his Democratic opponent Conor Lamb by more than a quarter-million dollars, a large step toward closing the financial gap between candidates by nearly tripling his cash on hand.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

Fourteen employees at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette will leave the newspaper in the latest round of company buyouts, though that number falls far short of the company’s goal. According to the Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh, a union which represents more than 100 employees, most people who took buyouts will be leaving by the end of the week. The group includes both veteran reporters and relative newcomers to the Pulitzer-prize winning paper.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

More than six weeks after George Floyd was killed under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer, protests in Pittsburgh continued to call for sweeping changes to the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police and an end to systemic racism.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

Despite a pandemic, high voter turnout, and a new election law, Allegheny County finished tallying votes in the June primary before most counties in the state. Now, the people behind that process are looking at what went right -- and what needs to be changed ahead of November.


Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

The Allegheny County Elections Division is starting to look at how to improve its procedures ahead of the November election, but some voting rights activists say decisions need to be made as soon as possible.

Jared Murphy and Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

As protests against police brutality sweep across the country, polling suggests most Americans support law-enforcement reform. In our year-long Split Ticket series, we’ve been asking four voters about the issues that could sway their decision at the ballot box. This month, the many reported acts of police brutality – and the President’s response to them – have deepened one voter’s commitment to be heard in November.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Senate Democrats in Washington blocked a Republican attempt at police reform Wednesday, saying it did not mandate actual change.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

The Allegheny County Board of Elections met Monday morning to review how the county handled the June primary -- an election that took place amid the unprecedented circumstances of a pandemic, a new mail-in voting law and voter turnout that was twice as high as expected. But while Democrats and Republican board members said the overall process was smooth, both sides saw areas for significant improvement.

Screengrab of House Judiciary Hearing via YouTube

As the House Judiciary Committee considered police reform legislation Wednesday, U.S. Rep. Guy Reschenthaler spoke out against defunding police departments -- and quickly received a correction from a Democratic colleague who wrote the bill being discussed. An amendment he proposed calling for an investigation of the "antifa" movement also went over poorly. 

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