Margaret J. Krauss

Development and Transportation Reporter

Margaret J. Krauss is WESA's development and transportation reporter. She previously worked for Keystone Crossroads, a statewide reporting initiative that covers problems facing Pennsylvania's cities and possible solutions. Before joining Keystone Crossroads, Margaret produced a 48-part radio series about Pittsburgh's lesser-known history, biking 2,000 miles around the region to do so.

Ways to Connect

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Nearly 200 people met virtually Thursday night to hear how the city of Pittsburgh plans to roll out its Bike(+) Master Plan, which aims to add 150 miles of bike infrastructure over the next 10 years.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Flats on Forward seemed like it would have been a no-brainer for the people who make decisions about how to spend Pittsburgh's $10 million annual investment in affordable housing. The mixed-use project from nonprofit developer ACTION-Housing, Inc. would create 43 apartments in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Squirrel Hill neighborhood. But some unexpected costs nearly derailed the whole effort.


Rothschild Doyno Collaborative

At a public meeting Thursday night, nonprofit developer The Community Builders presented its plan to redevelop 30 parcels of land in Hazelwood’s commercial district.

Courtesy of the Larimer Vision Plan

Workforce development and for-sale affordable homes are part of the Larimer Vision Plan. On Tuesday, City of Pittsburgh officials announced that a tax diversion program will send a $1 million grant to each initiative. The money comes from the latest phase of developer Walnut Capital’s Bakery Square project.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted nearly every aspect of daily life, and it may mean a significant shift in how southwestern Pennsylvania's planning agency approaches its work.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Port Authority of Allegheny County conducted an analysis of its service in 2020. Unsurprisingly, the coronavirus pandemic slammed the agency, as well as its low-income and minority riders, officials said at the first board meeting of 2021.

Jay Manning / PublicSource


When DaJuan Davis learned that his application for rent relief was denied, exposing him and his son to another potential eviction, he felt “crushed.”

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

The need for affordable housing in Pittsburgh continues to grow, and City Council is considering floating a bond to address the issue.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

In 2014, the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority spent $13 million dollars on its infrastructure, the pumps and pipes that make up its water and sewer systems. This year, PWSA’s board approved a capital budget of $233 million.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

As the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden approaches, discussions of further violence continue to percolate on mainstream sites like Twitter and Facebook, as well as platforms such as Parler. Pittsburgh officials are preparing for possible actions in the city next weekend, in the waning days of Donald Trump’s presidency.

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

Nearly 20 years after Pittsburgh was told it needed to do something about combined sewer overflows, the city and Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority are still working on it. However, officials are getting closer. 

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

The Pittsburgh Land Bank, created in 2014, has yet to buy, clear, and sell a single piece of property. At its January meeting the land bank's board is expected to vote on whether to make it an “affiliate entity” of the Urban Redevelopment Authority.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

The pandemic upended life in countless ways, including the collective realization of just how important home is.

Courtesy of the Department of Mobility and Infrastructure

Millions set aside for an infrastructure project in Pittsburgh’s 2021 capital budget will instead be used to fund housing, small businesses and street improvements.

Ryan Loew / 90.5 WESA

A growing body of research suggests there is no correlation between riding public transit and transmission of coronavirus, but case numbers among Port Authority of Allegheny County employees continue to rise.

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

Work on Pittsburgh’s Lower Hill district project is once again behind schedule. While delays have been common, for the first time the development arm of the Pittsburgh Penguins will pay a penalty.

Image courtesy of Desmone Architects

Target plans to build a 20,034 square foot store on the first floor of the Kaufmann’s building in downtown Pittsburgh. As long as the company receives its building permit and wins approval from the city’s Planning Commission, construction could start in mid-January.

Ryan Loew / 90.5 WESA

Two operators for Port Authority of Allegheny County died from COVID-19, the agency reported on Monday. One man was 57 and the other was 34.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

In the four years since Pennsylvania legalized the production, distribution and use of medical cannabis, the industry has quickly expanded. In deindustrialized towns like McKeesport, just outside Pittsburgh, cannabis has created new job opportunities, and could help seed new strains of revenue and employment.

Allyson Ruggieri / 90.5 WESA

Construction of Pittsburgh’s bus rapid transit or BRT project is expected to begin in late 2021. Port Authority of Allegheny County is working with a project management oversight consultant from the Federal Transit Administration to ensure the agency meets the remaining requirements, which include finalizing funding and design.

Joaquin Gonzalez / 90.5 WESA

Five years ago, a place called the Penn Plaza Apartments burst into the city of Pittsburgh’s collective awareness, when a letter from the building’s landlord became public.

Image courtesy of LaQuatra Bonci Associates

The lead commercial developer on Pittsburgh's Lower Hill, Buccini/Pollin Group, announced new partners on Thursday.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

On Wednesday the U.S. Department of Justice and the Environmental Protection Agency announced federal charges against the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority for past violations of the Clean Water Act.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

Some people worry there’s another looming housing crisis in Pittsburgh. It won’t hinge on tearing down buildings, because the buildings are already gone.


Joaquin Gonzalez / 90.5 WESA

Late in the fight for Penn Plaza, a new group of people arrives on the scene. They look at the battle for the apartment complex and see it as a symptom of a much bigger problem: lots of people can’t afford America’s “most livable city.”


Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

The mayor of Pittsburgh and his right hand man sit down to negotiate with Larry Gumberg and the Penn Plaza tenant council, led by Bob Jamison and Gail Williams. But what can city officials really do in scenarios like Penn Plaza? What power do cities actually have? A lot.


Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

A lot has been said in Pittsburgh about the would-be developers of the Penn Plaza Apartments, Lawrence Gumberg and his two sons, Brian and Zach. Land & Power presents the first and only comprehensive interview with the family. 


Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

In episode one of Land & Power, we meet Bob Jamison and Gail Williams, two residents of the Penn Plaza Apartments in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They react very differently to the news that they and 200 of their neighbors will have to leave their homes to make way for new development.


From 90.5 WESA, this is Land & Power: who has it, what they do with it, and how that shapes the cities around us.

 


Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Mayor Bill Peduto and his administration on Tuesday launched ForgingPGH, a new, year-long effort to explore how people want to see their neighborhoods and the city change. Ultimately, ForgingPGH will create a comprehensive guide to land use for the next 20 years.

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