Marylee Williams

Editor/Producer for The Confluence

I'm a multimedia journalist originally from the Gulf South. I graduated Louisiana State University, and then promptly left triple-digit temperatures, 90 percent humidity and gulf seafood to attend UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, where I concentrated in audio. I graduated in May 2017, and moved to Madison, Wisconsin for the Lee Ester News Fellowship at Wisconsin Public Radio. Prior to joining WESA, I was the senior producer on All Sides with Ann Fisher, a daily public affairs show on WOSU Public Media, based in Columbus, Ohio. 

Pittsburgh International Airport

On today's program: Pittsburgh International Airport increased safety protocols for COVID-19, but fewer than half of their usual passengers are flying this holiday; Consumer trends expert Audrey Guskey predicts Black Friday will include more online shopping, social distancing and some crowds; and we hear from some still waiting on pandemic unemployment benefits, eight months in.

Matt Slocum / AP

On today's program: Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald calls on residents to remain vigilant, not gather during COVID-19 surge; and psychologist Dr. Gretchen Chapman explains why, despite promising trials, the public may not immediately embrace a COVID-19 vaccine.


Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

  

The term “affordable housing” has been thrown around by government officials and in neighborhood meetings. But trying to create thousands of affordable housing units in Pittsburgh can be a complicated process. We discuss on this special edition of The Confluence.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Diamonte Walker with the Pittsburgh Urban Redevelopment Authority explains where equitable investment is taking place; and a developer and housing advocate explain the barriers to affordable housing, and what it would take to bring them down.

90.5 WESA

On today's program: David Dausey from Duquesne University outlines precautions for keeping students and families safe ahead of the holidays; A judge has ruled to count ballots cast in a hotly contested state senate race; and scientists have modified the American chestnut to survive blight, but some disagree GMO trees are the answer.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: A+ School’s latest report questions systemic inequities and where they can be resolved in public schools; Local resettlement organizations are preparing to support more refugees; and Marisel Vera’s new novel follows a Puerto Rican family that immigrated to Hawai’i.

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Distribution of $150 million in statewide rent relief lags, despite being sorely needed; The Trump campaign is challenging thousands of provisional ballots; and the University of Pittsburgh acquired August Wilson’s archive, opening the door to the playwright’s life for researchers. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

 


On today's program: COVID-19 cases in Allegheny County continue to rise; federal and state authorities are investigating the Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center where 82 residents have died during the pandemic; and a preview of a new WESA podcast, Land and Power.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The Trump campaign filed suit in federal court to stop certification of Pennsylvania’s election results; the Pittsburgh Steelers currently have their best start to a season since 1978; and the Film Pittsburgh Fall Festival presents dozens of full-length and short films completely virtually.

Rachel Gobep / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto presented Pittsburgh’s proposed 2021 budget earlier this week. It includes an almost 10 percent cut in police funding; and the latest phase of a sky mapping project could help answer long-held questions about our universe.

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

 


On today's program: The Pennsylvania Department of Health reported another record high number of COVID-19 cases this past weekend; and Democrats won the presidency, but didn’t fare as well on down ballot races.

Evan Vucci / AP

 


On today's program: The polls are closed, but President Trump continues to ratchet up the rhetoric around the presidential election; traditional retail spaces look for untraditional tenants as demand for storefronts in malls continues to go down; and a new grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services aims to increase access to technology in shelters. 

Julio Cortez / AP

 


On today's program: Ballots are still being counted in Pennsylvania and other swing states; and the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museums, and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Carnegie Institute. 

Matt Rourke / AP

 


On today's program: Pennsylvania has begun to tally votes, but final results won’t be available for a few days; and, as ballots are processed, Pennsylvania and other states could see more legal challenges.

Matt York / AP

On today's program: Women cast ballots at higher rates than men, but don’t vote in a bloc; workers at the Allegheny County Elections Division warehouse will begin pre-canvassing mail-in ballots this morning; and the Neighborhood Resilience Project is trying to recruit African American volunteers for COVID-19 vaccine trials.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority is requesting proposals for a stormwater master plan to stop stormwater and sewage overflows in the region; how to deal with election stress; and safety precautions to stay safe while voting in person.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 


On today's program: The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board approved a proposal to waive liquor license fees to provide financial relief to restaurants and bars hit hard by the pandemic; researchers try to take down disinformation using science and technology; and how Donald Trump’s and Joe Biden’s differences on environmental and energy policies could affect Pennsylvania.

Matt Rourke / AP

 


On today's program: Hospitalizations for COVID-19 cases are rising, but an infectious disease expert says hospitals in the Pittsburgh region aren’t stretched too thin; Riverlife is looking for public suggestions on how to fill the gaps in the loop connecting the city’s riverfronts; and a preview of a local House race where a long-term incumbent is facing a stiff challenge.

Kathleen J. Davis / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The Tree of Life community continues to live with the aftermath of the 2018 attack; a survivor of a Nazi concentration camp and the Tree of Life worshipper shares his story; and a writer documents the resilience of the Squirrel Hill community in a new book.

Francisco Seco / AP

 

On today's program: Parents deal with the challenges of online school; the pandemic is exacerbating educational inequality for already at-risk students; the lack of classroom, hallway and cafeteria socialization could negatively impact English language learners; and for Good Question, Kid! experts answer questions about language and geography.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The FCC is calling on governors to regulate rates and fees for intrastate phone calls; LGBTQ candidates in the general election could encourage more people from underrepresented groups to run for office; and drive-in theaters are enjoying a resurgence in popularity during the pandemic. 

Emma Lee / WHYY

 


On today's program: Allegheny County Rich Fitzgerald has proposed a new department for children initiatives; a new report showcases problems with policing and ways to address them; and voters discuss the reliability of election results. 

90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: A task force assembled in June released its report about current police practices; three clinical trials for potential coronavirus vaccines were paused after some participants got sick; and this year’s flu shot could serve as a dress rehearsal for when a coronavirus vaccine becomes available. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Allegheny County solicitor Andy Szefi answers questions about voting ahead of the general election; and this year, voters might not know election results on election night.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: A nationwide project tackles voter confusion in the lead up to the general election; a research project is developing new guidelines to help break the cycle of opioid prescriptions in dental settings; and Pittsburgh musician Ernie Hawkins remembers blues legend Reverend Gary Davis. 

Ryan Loew / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The Port Authority of Allegheny County is looking for a Director of Equity and Inclusion; and City of Asylum has a new executive director. 

Evan Vucci / AP

 


On today's program: State Republicans strategize to hold on to Pennsylvania in the general election; StoryCorps’ One Small Step project aims to bring people with differing views together; and a One Small Step conversation between two Pittsburghers. 

Carolyn Kaster / AP

 


On today's program: U.S. Senator Pat Toomey will not seek a third term in 2022 and will not run for governor; state Democrats want to turn Pennsylvania blue in the 2020 election; and Pittsburgh author Lee Gutkind discusses his new memoir.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 


On today's program: The Department of Agriculture mandates federally-funded Farmers to Families Food Boxes include a letter from President Trump; a rare bird was discovered in Westmoreland County; and the Black Lives Matter movement finds support in rural Pennsylvania. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 


On today's program: The NFL deals with its first coronavirus outbreak; one man is crossing Pennsylvania to distribute thousands of yard signs before the election; and the dispute over a successor to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg adds more tension to a divisive election year.

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