Westmoreland's 'Mingled Visions' Celebrates Stories & Challenges Stereotypes About Native Peoples

A new exhibition at The Westmoreland Museum of Art explores the effects of colonialism in America while highlighting the experiences of Native Americans. The museum is offering performances, discussions and culinary experiences as part of the collection, which is anchored by a photography exhibit called, "Mingled Visions: The Photographs of Edward S. Curtis and Will Wilson."

Anne Kraybill joined 90.5 WESA's The Confluence on Monday, April 1, 2019.
Credit Autumn Stankay / SkySight Photography

Anne Kraybill, the Westmoreland’s director and CEO, says that she hopes the exhibit will bring attention to the museum, but more importantly, to Native American artists.

“We’re a museum of American art," she says. "We have an opportunity and a responsibility to really diversify the conversation and expand the narrative to include many stories about what it means to be an American.”

The collection's images offer a comparison between the photographs of late 19th century photographer Edward Curtis and modern-day work by Diné photographer Will Wilson, a member of the Navajo Nation. The exhibit seeks to challenge stereotypical imagery of native peoples seemingly frozen in time. Wilson creates contemporary tintypes of Native Americans, and will select up to 12 participants for a personal shoot May 18.

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