The Confluence

Monday through Thursday at 9am

The Confluence, where the news comes together, is 90.5 WESA’s morning news show, broadcasting live from 9 to 10 a.m. on Pittsburgh's historic South Side.

Beyond the region's biggest headlines, The Confluence blends reporting from the WESA newsroom with one-on-one interviews and roundtable conversations with community leaders, experts, activists and interesting personalities about issues important to our region. Formerly weekly, the program debuted Sept. 2, 2016, and expanded to daily Aug. 27, 2018. 

The full-time team includes Kevin Gavin, Megan Harris and Kiley Koscinski, but they're always looking for interns. Find past episodes of The Confluence via podcast here, or suggest a person or topic by emailing confluence@wesa.fm.

Ways to Connect

Argo AI

On today's program: Argo AI’s CEO explores the future of self-driving cars in Pittsburgh; Hazelwood’s neighborhood plan gets approved after years of work by residents; and Honor Flight Pittsburgh is taking veterans on tours of Capitol memorials free of charge.

Nicklas Supply

 

On today's program: A conversation about social responsibility when it comes to hate; Obama-era coal pollution rules could dissolve; U.S. hardwoods profit margins are getting axed by the trade war; and more companies in Pittsburgh are giving their employees a say in major decisions. 

Courtesy of Dr. Lawrence Drake II

 

On today's program: Tuesday’s election results are in; as school lunch debt grows, "lunch shaming" returns; a peek inside a hemp processing facility as Pennsylvania’s industrial hemp growing season comes to a close; a Pittsburgh author finds brotherhood with other grieving black fathers; and new research asks if doctors receive gifts from opioid manufacturers, will they prescribe more? 

EcoDistricts.org

 


On today's program: Etna is the world’s first EcoDistrict; Murray Energy’s collapse could be a disaster for retiring coal miners; enrollment at Pittsburgh Public Schools is declining; a researcher is gathering data about plastics in PA rivers; and what to know before you vote today. 

Gene Russell / Adagio Health

 

On today's program: The NCAA is changing its tune on compensation for college athletes; a historic society honors Hazelwoods past and future; what to consider when lighting up your wood-burning fire pits this Autumn; and a new portrait series honors the thousands of local women who served in the armed forces.

Damian Dovarganes / AP

 

On today's program: What to expect one year from the 2020 elections; how tariffs are affecting some of PA’s steel workers; what PA can do to get ahead of a potential retirement crisis in manufacturing; and how Pittsburgh safety officials are preparing for the threat of bioterrorism.

NewStart.Media / West Virginia University


On today's program: A new WVU program clams newspapers are in a buyer’s market; cybercrime is on the rise in Pittsburgh; a local artist fits his enormous murals into a new book; a state senator wants to strengthen PA’s campaign finance laws; and a preview of Tuesday’s biggest race. 

Kathleen J. Davis / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: The U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs wants to cut wait times and improve mental health care for veterans; unionized cleaners in Pittsburgh have a new and improved contract; Pirates management is cleaning house; and the annual Pittsburgh Shorts Film Festival returns with more than 100 stories, including that of Steelers great Rocky Bleier. 

Mike Fabus / Pittsburgh Steelers

 

On today's program: Jim Rooney honors his father with a new tome; a local company brings dancers to the Hill District; community members gather to remember the 11 victims of the Tree of Life attack; Heinz is celebrating its 150th birthday; and a Pittsburgh-based refugee services program is going national. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

 


On this special report: One year ago today, 11 people were killed and five others wounded at the Tree of Life synagogue in Squirrel Hill. It remains the most deadly anti-Semitic attack on American soil. 90.5 WESA’s The Confluence presents a look back at the hurt and healing that has transpired since. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: Two journalists reflect on covering Pittsburgh’s Jewish community; some Tree of Life members are at odds with seeking the death penalty against the alleged gunman; police are still grappling with the trauma of responding to the scene of the attack; how a graphic design inspired unity in the city; and mourners organize events to bring members of the community back together. 

Kevin Gavin / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: City Councilman Daniel Lavelle opines on the future of the Hill District; a Heinz Award recipient is pushing back on stereotypes of African Americans; questions remain about the future of the Tree of Life building; the debate over policing and LGBTQ protections is playing out in races for Allegheny County Council; and an investigation reveals state lawmakers are spending campaign dollars on things like DNA tests and expensive wine. 

APOST

 

On today's program: One Carnegie Mellon University professor wants to democratize access to computer programming; Pittsburgh’s Jewish community is still healing after the Tree of Life attack; research has found some vaping products share the same toxic chemicals as traditional cigarettes; and local afterschool programs gear up for a celebration this week. 

Matt Rourke / AP

 On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto says the city remains united, but not much has changed about guns or violent crime in the one year since the attack at Tree of Life synagogue; and childhood obesity rates in Pennsylvania have climbed into the nation's top 10.

Courtesy of Sheri Fink / Washington and Jefferson College

On today's program: Author Sheri Fink tells Pittsburgh what it means to be prepared; a look at one free, community-based fitness program changing lives; the people and plans behind the URA’s latest deadline for the Civic Arena site; and how Friday’s 3rd Circuit Court ruling will affect protests outside abortion providers in Pittsburgh.

Sony Pictures

On today's program: The Pittsburgh Film Office is having to turn a lot of big productions away; Andy Warhol’s faith goes on display; the city is giving away its plants Downtown; and mental health treatment remains elusive for some defendants waiting to stand trial.  

32BJ SEIU

On today's program: Pennsylvania may consider allowing college athletes to get paid; encouraging natural gas development in the state could mean big changes at the DEP; a local man claims he lost a job after using medical marijuana; and unionized cleaners in Pittsburgh are fighting for better working conditions. 

Carolyn Kaster / AP

On today's program: Southwestern Pennsylvania is hiring a couple hundred plow truck drivers; the Steelers say Mexico is their biggest international market, but others are growing; Pittsburgh Opera is encouraging patrons to use their cell phone during shows; and Pittsburgh International warns catfishing for airline fees is much more common than you’d think.

Chatham University

On today's program: Chatham University celebrates decades of gender equity, entrepreneurship and political acumen; a 55-acre Philadelphia dump-turned-residential neighborhood is getting cleaned up; a look at the use of gag orders in criminal cases; and what to look for on election day in Allegheny County races.  

David Gilke / NPR

On today's program: Quil Lawrence is headed to Pittsburgh to share his experiences covering U.S. veterans; a public school teacher helps students get a second chance; Pennsylvania farmers are grappling with the impact of the trade war, which a Pitt political economist says was never a good plan; and a Revolutionary-era log house is being moved to historic Hanna’s Town. 

Courtest of Touchstone Center for Crafts

On today's program: Touchstone keeps traditional crafting alive in the Laurel Highlands; The Bellefield Tower is the last remnant of a community; Pittsburgh's three major sports teams are having a rough year; and the ACLU of Pennsylvania wants to throw out a state constitutional amendment referendum. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

On today's program: Pennsylvania could be the roadmap to handling gerrymandering in other states; new meat inspection rules could have implications for the safety of food and workers; a local school takes a new approach to teaching social studies; Pittsburghers consider a tax to pay for city parks improvements; and state police aren't collecting data about the race of those they pull over. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: More veterans are dying from suicide than on the battlefield; Crawford Grill could soon be a nationally recognized historic landmark; Pitt has appealed a renewed chance for its grad students to unionize; and there's a new database of addiction treatment and recovery resources across Pennsylvania.

Courtesy of John Van Hamersveld

On today's program: The man behind dozens of iconic 1960's album covers brings his art to Greensburg; Pennsylvania's first vaping-illness death is reported; a local doctor is testing out fixed prices for medical services instead of insurance; and the new SCOTUS term could result in dozens of landmark decisions on issues like abortion and gun control. 

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: A conversation with U.S. Attorney Scott Brady on what's next in the Tree of Life shooting trial; a Perry Hilltop organization gives students trade skills; Pennsylvania's has one of the highest freight trucking rates in the country; and Port Authority expounds on its next 20 years. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

On today's program: A new agency to support Tree of Life survivors opens its doors; a legal battle ensues (again) over prayer during House sessions; Pennsylvania's ethane is being used overseas; immunization exemptions could change after a measles outbreak; and it's your last chance to register to vote ahead of November's election. 

Courtesy of Stephen Chbosky / Grand Central Publishing

On today's program: Pittsburgh native and author Stephen Chbosky talks about his latest release ahead of a trip home; an expert weighs in on which Democratic hopefuls have the best plans to address climate change; how the PA Turnpike laid the groundwork for today's interstate highway system; and activists are putting pressure on a coke plant in Erie.

Andrew Harnik / AP

On today's program: Mayor Peduto returns from the world stage on climate action; robotics and AI are helping power a local agriculture company; Pittsburgh restaurants are helping restore the Chesapeake Bay; the state Supreme Court declines to abolish capital punishment in PA; and a reporter hopes to find tangible solutions to child poverty in the region. 

Courtesy of Riverlife

On today's program: Riverlife's new CEO says development is critical to riverfront protection; how federal refugee caps are affecting Pennsylvania's immigrants; why Jewish New Year celebrations are being celebrated at a Christian sanctuary; Sen. Bob Casey says Dems can't put progressive ideas ahead of actually winning the election; and the nation's first openly transgender swimmer on what it took to compete in the NCAA.

PennDOT

On today's program: John Fetterman says time is now for recreational marijuana in Pennsylvania; PennDOT is preparing to test autonomous cars in highway construction zones; and a preview of how libraries and librarians have had to adapt to keep up with changing technologies and expectations.

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