The Confluence

Weekdays at 9AM

The Confluence, where the news comes together, is 90.5 WESA’s daily news show, broadcasting live weekdays from 9 to 10 a.m.

The program, which debuted as a weekly show Sept. 2, 2016, and expanded to daily Aug. 27, 2018, provides context beyond the region's biggest headlines, blending reporting from the WESA newsroom with one-on-one interviews and roundtable conversations with community leaders, experts, activists and interesting personalities about issues important to our region.

The full-time team includes Kevin Gavin, Megan Harris and Kiley Koscinski. Find past episodes of the Confluence via podcast here, or suggest a person or topic by emailing confluence@wesa.fm.

Ways to Connect

Courtest of Touchstone Center for Crafts

On today's program: Touchstone keeps traditional crafting alive in the Laurel Highlands; The Bellefield Tower is the last remnant of a community; Pittsburgh's three major sports teams are having a rough year; and the ACLU of Pennsylvania wants to throw out a state constitutional amendment referendum. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

On today's program: Pennsylvania could be the roadmap to handling gerrymandering in other states; new meat inspection rules could have implications for the safety of food and workers; a local school takes a new approach to teaching social studies; Pittsburghers consider a tax to pay for city parks improvements; and state police aren't collecting data about the race of those they pull over. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: More veterans are dying from suicide than on the battlefield; Crawford Grill could soon be a nationally recognized historic landmark; Pitt has appealed a renewed chance for its grad students to unionize; and there's a new database of addiction treatment and recovery resources across Pennsylvania.

Courtesy of John Van Hamersveld

On today's program: The man behind dozens of iconic 1960's album covers brings his art to Greensburg; Pennsylvania's first vaping-illness death is reported; a local doctor is testing out fixed prices for medical services instead of insurance; and the new SCOTUS term could result in dozens of landmark decisions on issues like abortion and gun control. 

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: A conversation with U.S. Attorney Scott Brady on what's next in the Tree of Life shooting trial; a Perry Hilltop organization gives students trade skills; Pennsylvania's has one of the highest freight trucking rates in the country; and Port Authority expounds on its next 20 years. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

On today's program: A new agency to support Tree of Life survivors opens its doors; a legal battle ensues (again) over prayer during House sessions; Pennsylvania's ethane is being used overseas; immunization exemptions could change after a measles outbreak; and it's your last chance to register to vote ahead of November's election. 

Courtesy of Stephen Chbosky / Grand Central Publishing

On today's program: Pittsburgh native and author Stephen Chbosky talks about his latest release ahead of a trip home; an expert weighs in on which Democratic hopefuls have the best plans to address climate change; how the PA Turnpike laid the groundwork for today's interstate highway system; and activists are putting pressure on a coke plant in Erie.

Andrew Harnik / AP

On today's program: Mayor Peduto returns from the world stage on climate action; robotics and AI are helping power a local agriculture company; Pittsburgh restaurants are helping restore the Chesapeake Bay; the state Supreme Court declines to abolish capital punishment in PA; and a reporter hopes to find tangible solutions to child poverty in the region. 

Courtesy of Riverlife

On today's program: Riverlife's new CEO says development is critical to riverfront protection; how federal refugee caps are affecting Pennsylvania's immigrants; why Jewish New Year celebrations are being celebrated at a Christian sanctuary; Sen. Bob Casey says Dems can't put progressive ideas ahead of actually winning the election; and the nation's first openly transgender swimmer on what it took to compete in the NCAA.

PennDOT

On today's program: John Fetterman says time is now for recreational marijuana in Pennsylvania; PennDOT is preparing to test autonomous cars in highway construction zones; and a preview of how libraries and librarians have had to adapt to keep up with changing technologies and expectations.

Provided by Arielle Evans / Courtesy of HundrED

On today's program: Pittsburgh education takes an international honor; apple growers face an unknown threat that's killing trees; school districts are debating allowing teachers to carry guns in classrooms; and a chance to check-in on your 2020 Democratic hopeful bingo card.

Sarah Boden / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Port Authority CEO Katharine Kelleman explains the latest adjustment to Pittsburgh's federal BRT application; legislation would mandate adult changing tables in public venues; and the United Steelworkers will represent 90 tech workers contracted with Google.

Grant Eldridge / Audubon Photography Awards

On today's program: New prison parole policies could follow in the wake of recent homicides; a deadly mosquito-born virus has moved into Pennsylvania; Open Doors Pittsburgh returns with new spaces and insider tours; and what locals can do to support disappearing migratory bird populations.

Marion Ettinger / Penguin Random House

On today's program: Author Sigrid Nunez breaks hearts with puppy love; an Oakland man insists mentorship has no retirement age; Pittsburgh's historic buildings were identified, but not protected; a peek at ALCOSAN's long-awaited sewege plan; and how the South Hills are recovering after a gargantuan water main break flooded multiple neighborhoods.

Evan Agostini / Invision/AP

On today's program: A former senior White House advisor is on her way to Pittsburgh; how recent headlines about Daylin Leach and Mike Folmer will affect the opening session of the Pennsylvania Senate; a federal policy shift could affect health outcomes for immigrant children; a veteran climate change activist says people should ask more from their governments; and how Pennsylvania students are (and aren't) taught about climate science.

Courtesy of Tree Pittsburgh

On today's program: Tree Pittsburgh looks to a giveaway to help the city's tree canopy; a philosopher tries to understand climate science deniers and change their minds; NPR's David Greene peeps the upcoming hockey season; how Pittsburgh isn’t preparing for potential climate migration; and a new immersive theatre project explores how AI affects modern life and whether humans have a say. 

Christy Bostardi

On today's program: A blues guitarist-turned-philosopher explains his unorthodox education; five prisoners write a book about life behind bars; how piano-making took root in Pittsburgh; and what to look for from Banned Books Week in Pittsburgh.

Courtesy of YouthPlaces

On today's program: A North Side nonprofit will host an after school program at the convention center; state lawmakers could consider changing Pennsylvania's life without parole sentencing structure; a check in with the Pittsburgh diocese a year after a salacious grand jury report; and the state House reconvenes today with an agenda that could include new work requirements for Medicaid recipients. 

Penguin Random House

On today's program: A food writer follows a cast extraordinary chefs around the world, and casts his sights on Pittsburgh; a local group is teaching families how to advocate for quality medical care; Allegheny County sees its first jury conviction using a 30-year-old law; and citizens could be responsible for redrawing state legislative districts—if lawmakers are willing to give that up.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: A local leader is coordinating a national strategy for how the government can better support family caregivers; how Allegheny County tracks and treats a Hepatitis A outbreak; a Duquesne University forum digs into the mind of a serial killer; and City Council wants some control over how a proposed park tax would be spent. 

Bill O'Driscoll / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: DNA excavated from a nearby rockshelter could tell us about humanity 19,000 years ago; how the once-lost running buffalo clover has rebounded; why Pennsylvania is suing the family behind Purdue Pharma; and Pittsburgh ranks among the most sustainable for its building practices.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: Two state legislators want to pass a bill to confront sexual harassment in state government; how the flu shot can strengthen herd immunity; a regulations loophole might be to blame for toxic landfill runoff; and the state plans to close the Polk Center for adults with intellectual disabilities. 

R. Alan Adams Photography

On today's program: Point Park teams up with a Mississippi newsroom to investigate lead in water; how the "felony murder" charge has given thousands life sentences, despite many having nothing to do with the homicide; and a year into a merger, how is Pittsburgh's early music organization keeping baroque alive?

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

On today's program: Pennsylvania farmers are seeing the impact of trade tariffs with China; a local project is spreading kindness with a needle and thread; the Wolf administration is commuting more life sentences; and a very common, very toxic chemical is contaminating water supplies.

Courtesy of The University of Pittsburgh

On today's program: Provost Ann Cudd says Pitt’s Pell match will make the school more competitive; Pittsburgh remembers Mac Miller one year after his death; local police want to diversify their ranks; an anthology of art that uniquely reflects Pittsburgh; and the Steelers start their regular season against New England. 

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Propel charter schools are prioritizing early learning benchmarks; fires in the Amazon rainforest are diminishing migratory bird habitats; a lot of Pittsburghers think they live in the Midwest; and local universities want to register more student voters ahead of the 2020 elections. 

Courtesy of ReelAbilities Pittsburgh

On today's program: Gov. Tom Wolf hopes his recent executive orders lead to chamber-debated legislation; a reform commission suggests creating a new team to redraw PA's congressional map in 2020; Pittsburgh's Shakespeare in the Park presents a brand new take on the story of Caesar; and a film festival spotlights the work and stories of people with different abilities. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

On today's program: How Pittsburgh's community gardens embody neighborhood flair; what it means to study osteopathic medicine; how the city's micromobility priorities are evolving; what the Allegheny Conference is considering to re-brand Pittsburgh; and why Allegheny County has few options to replace voting machines ahead of the 2020 election. 

Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures

On today's program: What it takes to find balance for Pittsburgh's reading and listening pleasure; how the Allegheny County Jail educates the minors in its charge; impeachment talks are dividing the activists who helped propel Conor Lamb to victory; a look at the opioid epidemic tracks with previous substance use plagues; and a starter list of Pittsburgh must-sees.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Black newspapers can weather shifts in community news; parents worry about a controversial herbicide being used on school property; some Tree of Life congregants disagree with a death penalty for Robert Bowers; the nation's largest Amish settlement is being encroached on by development; Amazon partners with the Pittsburgh Health Data Alliance; and NPR's David Greene hopes the Steelers can overcome a distraction-filled postseason. 

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