The Confluence

Monday through Thursday at 9am

The Confluence, where the news comes together, is 90.5 WESA’s morning news show, broadcasting live from 9 to 10 a.m. on Pittsburgh's historic South Side.

Beyond the region's biggest headlines, The Confluence blends reporting from the WESA newsroom with one-on-one interviews and roundtable conversations with community leaders, experts, activists and interesting personalities about issues important to our region. Formerly weekly, the program debuted Sept. 2, 2016, and expanded to daily Aug. 27, 2018. 

The full-time team includes Kevin Gavin, Marylee Williams and Julia Zenkevich, but they're always looking for interns. Find past episodes of The Confluence via podcast here, or suggest a person or topic by emailing confluence@wesa.fm.

Ways to Connect

Matt Rourke / AP

 


On today's program: Hospitalizations for COVID-19 cases are rising, but an infectious disease expert says hospitals in the Pittsburgh region aren’t stretched too thin; Riverlife is looking for public suggestions on how to fill the gaps in the loop connecting the city’s riverfronts; and a preview of a local House race where a long-term incumbent is facing a stiff challenge.

Kathleen J. Davis / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The Tree of Life community continues to live with the aftermath of the 2018 attack; a survivor of a Nazi concentration camp and the Tree of Life worshipper shares his story; and a writer documents the resilience of the Squirrel Hill community in a new book.

Francisco Seco / AP

 

On today's program: Parents deal with the challenges of online school; the pandemic is exacerbating educational inequality for already at-risk students; the lack of classroom, hallway and cafeteria socialization could negatively impact English language learners; and for Good Question, Kid! experts answer questions about language and geography.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The FCC is calling on governors to regulate rates and fees for intrastate phone calls; LGBTQ candidates in the general election could encourage more people from underrepresented groups to run for office; and drive-in theaters are enjoying a resurgence in popularity during the pandemic. 

Emma Lee / WHYY

 


On today's program: Allegheny County Rich Fitzgerald has proposed a new department for children initiatives; a new report showcases problems with policing and ways to address them; and voters discuss the reliability of election results. 

90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: A task force assembled in June released its report about current police practices; three clinical trials for potential coronavirus vaccines were paused after some participants got sick; and this year’s flu shot could serve as a dress rehearsal for when a coronavirus vaccine becomes available. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Allegheny County solicitor Andy Szefi answers questions about voting ahead of the general election; and this year, voters might not know election results on election night.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: A nationwide project tackles voter confusion in the lead up to the general election; a research project is developing new guidelines to help break the cycle of opioid prescriptions in dental settings; and Pittsburgh musician Ernie Hawkins remembers blues legend Reverend Gary Davis. 

Ryan Loew / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The Port Authority of Allegheny County is looking for a Director of Equity and Inclusion; and City of Asylum has a new executive director. 

Evan Vucci / AP

 


On today's program: State Republicans strategize to hold on to Pennsylvania in the general election; StoryCorps’ One Small Step project aims to bring people with differing views together; and a One Small Step conversation between two Pittsburghers. 

Carolyn Kaster / AP

 


On today's program: U.S. Senator Pat Toomey will not seek a third term in 2022 and will not run for governor; state Democrats want to turn Pennsylvania blue in the 2020 election; and Pittsburgh author Lee Gutkind discusses his new memoir.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 


On today's program: The Department of Agriculture mandates federally-funded Farmers to Families Food Boxes include a letter from President Trump; a rare bird was discovered in Westmoreland County; and the Black Lives Matter movement finds support in rural Pennsylvania. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 


On today's program: The NFL deals with its first coronavirus outbreak; one man is crossing Pennsylvania to distribute thousands of yard signs before the election; and the dispute over a successor to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg adds more tension to a divisive election year.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: A recap of the key takeaways for Pennsylvania voters after the first presidential debate; the Pittsburgh Regional Alliance has unveiled a new brand to market the area to businesses and individuals; and a local nonprofit is working to make sure Pittsburgh’s Latino community counts in the 2020 census.

Alan Diaz / AP

 


On today's program: Initial reports suggest nine ballots from military personnel found discarded were a mistake, not voter fraud; air passenger traffic at Pittsburgh International Airport has plateaued after a slight bump; and the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way people mourn. 

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Online schooling poses new challenges for students enrolled in special education courses; new learning environments put teachers under stress and impact their mental health; some parents are turning to learning hubs for childcare and help with school work; and for Good Question, Kid! a teacher answers students’ science questions. 

Pennsylvania played a key role in the election of President Donald Trump in the 2016 election. This year, both Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden have their eye on winning Pennsylvania and securing the state's 20 electoral votes. 

Seth Perlman / AP

 


On today's program: After a report found that Black students in Pittsburgh are referred to the juvenile justice system at much higher rates than their white peers, the Pittsburgh Board of Education says they will take steps to reimagine school safety; machine learning could help proactively identify children most at-risk for lead poisoning; and how fire hydrants ended up on trails in Frick Park.

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The long-lasting impacts of redlining are still felt in some Pittsburgh neighborhoods; the Pittsburgh Art Commission plans to debate the removal of the Christopher Columbus statue in Schenley Park; and Puerto Ricans living in Pennsylvania after being displaced by Hurricane Maria look forward to voting in the U.S. presidential election. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The City of Pittsburgh has a budget shortfall of about $100 million due to the pandemic-induced recession, but Allegheny County’s finances are more stable; during the pandemic, the League of Women Voters adapts their voter outreach strategies; and hotel workers face difficult decisions as the industry remains in limbo. 

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: COVID-19 cases are up slightly in Allegheny County since the start of the school year; a preview of the races for president, state row offices, and legislative seats in Pennsylvania; and a look at the 28th House district race to replace former House Speaker Mike Turzai. 

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

 


On today's program: A federal emergency assistance program for people who lost their jobs due to the pandemic is running out of money well ahead of schedule; voters can choose from multiple ways to cast their ballots this November; and local arts organizations say they’ve been harmed by a ticketing service that’s not holding up its end of the deal.

Matt Rourke / AP

 


On today's program: The election is fast approaching, but lawsuits surrounding this fall’s vote are still tied up in court; college students face uncertainty and confusion about how to vote during the pandemic; and half of Pennsylvania schools do not employ any teachers of color. 

Jessica Kourkounis / Keystone Crossroads

 


On today's program: A new report shows that Black students in Pittsburgh are referred to the juvenile justice system at a much higher rate than their white counterparts; and Pennsylvania could join a regional cap-and-trade program.

Keith Srakocic / AP

 


On today's program: Though the unemployment rate remains high, some sectors of the Pittsburgh economy are beginning the slow recovery process; the new school year poses additional difficulties for students who lack secure housing; and guidance on traveling during the pandemic can be confusing.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Renters who lost their income due to COVID-19 have been caught in the middle of a changing tide of federal and state mandates; the Hazelwood community is being asked for suggestions for a plan to develop 27 acres along the Monongahela River; and the legacy of organized labor in Pittsburgh continues. 

Evan Vucci / AP

 


On today's program: The political rhetoric in the presidential campaign has been polarizing over racial injustice and street protests; Dannielle Brown has been on a hunger strike for nearly ten weeks, and residents of the Hill District have been caring for her. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: The University of Pittsburgh implemented a mandatory Black studies course to help students learn anti-racism; despite orders from the police chief, videos from some Pittsburgh protests have shown officers working without masks; and apprenticeships and technical schools welcome students back amid the pandemic.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

 


On today's program: Trump and Biden make Pittsburgh-area campaign stops as both vie for Pennsylvania’s 20 electoral votes; a remote school year could leave kids feeling isolated and impact their mental health; and during the pandemic, some stores forgo reusable bags for single-use plastic bags.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: A Republican legislative proposal would limit where voters could deposit their mail-in ballots; a new report says many highway “stop-and-frisks” are conducted illegally and eventually thrown out in court; and some types of pollution may be increasing due to climate change.

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