The World

Monday-Friday, 7pm
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe, hosted by Marco Werman.

If one thing is clear about this teeny tiny new coronavirus, it’s that it has changed the world. Its mark is massive. But SARS-CoV-2 is still clouded in mystery, and front and center in this puzzle is understanding immunity.

Why do some people get sick, and others don’t? What mechanisms in the body can successfully fight off the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease COVID-19, and what backfires?

“One of the important questions that we were trying to figure out is what sort of immunity is protective for SARS-CoV-2?”

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

Brayan Guevara comes from a long line of educators: His mother is a college instructor, and his grandparents were teachers in Honduras. 

Now, Guevara is on the same path. The 19-year-old is a sophomore at Guilford Technical Community College in Greensboro, North Carolina, and wants to become a teacher.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Four men on motorcycles arrived outside of 47-year-old Husham al-Hashimi’s house in darkness on Monday.

When Hashimi, a prominent security expert in Iraq, pulled up in his car, one of the men approached the vehicle and started shooting. Then, the gunman ran back to his motorcycle and the group sped off.

Related: Before coronavirus, young Iraqis held some of the biggest protests in the country's history

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

When Pakistani politician Tanzeela Qambrani introduced a resolution to the Sindh Assembly condemning George Floyd’s death, she carried with her a photo of him.

Qambrani’s ancestors were enslaved by traders; she’s a fourth-generation African and says that background has made her feel connected to Floyd, and the activism his tragic killing has inspired.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

For the past four years, Reyna Isabel Alvarez Navarro has reported to work at a crawfish processing plant in Crowley, Louisiana, bundled in two pairs of pants, two sweaters and a hat. She spent her days inside a freezing room where up to 100 employees worked elbow to elbow peeling crawfish. 

The cold, crowded conditions weren’t new for the 36-year-old seasonal worker from northern Mexico. But it turned out to be the perfect setting for the novel coronavirus to spread: This spring, several dozen workers in the plant fell ill with COVID-19, including Alvarez Navarro. 

For the past four years, Reyna Isabel Alvarez Navarro has reported to work at a crawfish processing plant in Crowley, Louisiana, bundled in two pairs of pants, two sweaters and a hat. She spent her days inside a freezing room where up to 100 employees worked elbow to elbow peeling crawfish. 

The cold, crowded conditions weren’t new for the 36-year-old seasonal worker from northern Mexico. But it turned out to be the perfect setting for the novel coronavirus to spread: This spring, several dozen workers in the plant fell ill with COVID-19, including Alvarez Navarro. 

Christoph Beuttler, carbon dioxide removal manager and policy expert at Climeworks, said that since the company started 11 years ago in Zurich, it has faced plenty of pushback.

Climeworks is one of the first and best-known companies to direct air capture — or pull carbon dioxide directly out of ambient air for storage or use, which can help lower emissions in the atmosphere. 

Kim Eun-joo, 37, grew up in the mountains of North Korea’s Hamgyong Province, near the border with China. By North Korean standards, her family was well off, working as currency traders.

But 14 years ago, Kim defected to the South. Now, she lives in the capital, Seoul, and is studying journalism at a local university.

Last year’s fires in the Amazon captured the world’s attention. They raged across Brazil, engulfing the recently deforested Amazon jungle. Smoke darkened São Paulo’s skies more than a thousand miles away.

Ranchers, loggers and businessmen in the state of Pará organized simultaneous illegal blazes last year on Aug. 10, which they called “the day of fire.” It jump-started the wave of fires across the Amazon.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

When Al Yarubiyah border crossing was closed in January, 1.4 million Syrians were cut off from outside help, aid groups say. 

Al Yarubiyah connects northeastern Syria with northern Iraq. It was one of five official border crossings to get humanitarian aid into northern Syria.

Related: US targets Assad govt and backers with toughest sanctions yet against Syria

Pumas roaming the empty streets of Santiago in Chile. Dolphins in the unusually calm waters off of Trieste Italy. Jackals roaming city parks in Tel Aviv in broad daylight.

The lockdowns on human movement during the pandemic have also changed the way wildlife is behaving.

Two years ago, after living in the United States for more than two decades, Madai Zamora headed to the airport in Charlotte, North Carolina, and boarded a one-way  flight to Mexico.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

This year marks 20 years since the US first made a historic commitment to ending modern slavery.

As countries around the globe start to reopen, the big question is how to do it safely. 

The European Union is set to reopen its borders starting July 1. Visitors from the US and Russia are among those that are restricted from entering Europe, The New York Times reported on Friday.

Outside the Ethiopian Embassy in Beirut, a dozen women gather under a small overhang to shelter from the sun. Their suitcases and bags are stacked against the wall. On the ground sits a piece of cardboard with “we want to go home” written in their native Amharic.

For nine hours on Wednesday, Özge Terkoğlu sat in the gallery of a Turkish courtroom hearing testimony against her husband, Barış Terkoğlu, the news director of OdaTV, an online TV channel. 

Watching her husband take the stand, she fretted about his weight loss over the past three months he spent in prison. 

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

As the pandemic has grasped the world's attention, China has been testing boundaries — both geographically and legally. Submarines in Japanese waters, incursions into Taiwanese airspace and deadly clashes with Indian soldiers in the Himalayas have been displays of China's military assertiveness that are raising alarms in Washington.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

SCOTUS rules some rejected asylum-seekers can't challenge decisions

Jun 25, 2020

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that immigrants denied asylum under streamlined proceedings cannot contest those decisions in court.

The case involved a Sri Lankan farmer named Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam, a member of the Tamil ethnic minority, who said he feared persecution. The justices ruled in favor of the Trump administration in its appeal of a lower court ruling that Thuraissigiam had a right to have a judge review the government's handling of his asylum bid.

It was the sort of letter no one wants to receive: a government summons, alleging an offense against public morality.

The recipient was Niks Anuman-Rajadhon, a bar owner in Bangkok.

“They were basically asking me to come in for interrogation,” he said.

So, he obeyed, agreeing to meet with a panel of bureaucrats on the assigned date. His crime? They told him he’d been inducing people to drink alcohol online.

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

“Dale, dale, dale no pierdas el tino ...”

About 20 friends and family members surround Marlene Herrera in her aunt’s yard in northern San Diego County. They’re mostly social distancing. The crowd sings in Spanish, urging her to not lose momentum. 

“Go, go, go, don’t lose your aim …”

In Northern Ireland, police reform meant tackling institutional sectarianism

Jun 24, 2020

Northern Ireland saw violent clashes between Catholics and Protestants for three decades. Then in 2001, residents decided to dismantle its mostly Protestant police force and design a new one — one that would include Catholics.

What happened in Northern Ireland could provide some lessons for the United States, where there are increasing calls to defund or abolish police departments in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd last month.

For years, Derrick Sanderlin volunteered as a trainer to help San Jose police officers to spot their biases. He also worked to improve their ties with African Americans like him, as well as the city’s large immigrant communities.

Then, on May 29, he participated in a Black Lives Matter demonstration in downtown San Jose. Things grew tense. 

“I saw a fair amount of innocent protesters just being shot with rubber bullets, some at point-blank.”

Derrick Sanderlin, volunteer anti-bias trainer

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