The Andy Warhol Museum

Courtesy of ZYNKA Gallery

Jeff Jarzynka was in his 40s when his father was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer. Leaving his job and helping to care for his dad changed Jarzynka’s life in more ways than one. And the experience led him, ultimately, to open Pittsburgh’s newest commercial art gallery, one focused on showcasing local talent.

Courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum

Andy Warhol is arguably the most influential artist since World War II. But Warhol was full of paradoxes – at once aggressively public and deeply private, and a serious artist who presented his life and art as all surface: the soup-can paintings, the candy-colored Marilyns, the glitzy Manhattan social scene. Beyond his towering status, there’s not much consensus about who Warhol, a man whose works have sold for $100 million or more, really was.

The Andy Warhol Museum

Andy Warhol was a pioneering artist, surely the most influential since World War II. But he was also unique as a collector.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

On today's program: business investment indicators increased in the region; the Braddock Battlefield History Center is reopening; Kim Gordon puts music to a Warhol silent film classic; and a new production tells the story of a future where holographic companions replace lost loved ones.   

Photo by Bill O'Driscoll / 90.5 WESA News

Kim Gordon started playing music as an indirect result of pursuing art. Now, her music has led – also indirectly – to a milestone in her art career: the Sonic Youth co-founder’s first solo North American museum exhibit.

“Kim Gordon: Lo-Fi Glamour” opens today at The Andy Warhol Museum. The exhibit commands the museum’s second floor with paintings, drawing and sculpture spanning the past decade of Gordon’s 30-year art practice.

Image courtesy of Alexis Gideon

“2028: Proclaiming Earth to be a misogynistic dystopia, the art-pop super duo Princess prepares a rocket ship to find a better world. As only two white men could.”

Photo by Seth Caplan

Some side-eye. A curt “gurrrl, please.” A sarcastically drawn-out “ohhh-kaay.” These are just a few manifestations of shade, that versatile conversational tool long used by African-American woman and gay men. Thanks in part to reality TV, shade has spread in the culture, and Rashaad Newsome has seen a disturbing outcome: White people who casually throw shade also stereotype black people who do the same as “ghetto.”