art

Joel Tsui / Courtesy of Satellite Space and Kevin Clancy

Kevin Clancy grew up in the time before everyone had cell phones – back when a dial-up connection at his mom’s office was his lone internet access.

Photo by Bill O'Driscoll / 90.5 WESA News

Indoor stage or outdoor? For Squonk Opera, it seldom has been a question: For most of its 27 years, the troupe has focused on open-air extravaganzas, filled with its melodic art rock and big, surreal props.

Carnegie Mellon University

On today’s program: A conversation with a pioneer of the space art movement about the first museum on the moon; Pennsylvania rivers get a second life as recreation hubs; the commonwealth's clean slate law gives second chances; researchers at Magee-Womens Research Institute are developing a new mesh for pelvic prolapse; and a sneak peek of WYEP Summer Music Fest.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today’s program: Artworks by artists of color open in a new exhibition Saturday; Carnegie library workers take steps in unionize; and a debate between the ACLU of Pennsylvania and the Center for Victims about Marsy’s Law.  

Photo by Jon Rubin

A dozen Pittsburgh artists will have their work exhibited in London beginning this weekend. The exhibition, titled Pittsburgh Art on the Bank, includes works from photographer Teenie Harris, sculptor Thad Mosley, interdisciplinary artist Alisha Wormsley, cartoonist Ed Piskar and others. It’s meant to publicize British Airways’ new nonstop flights from Pittsburgh to London Heathrow, which launched in April, and promote the Steel City as a vacation destination.

Courtesy of The University of Pittsburgh

On today's program: The University of Pittsburgh just got a treasure trove from the estate of horror great George Romero; a queer youth theater program is debuting a new multimedia production; City Council District 9 candidates are readying for Tuesday's primary election; CEOs take a stand against the stigma around mental illness; and the state's top court hears from both sides of the UPMC / Highmark split. 

Will Wilson / Courtesy of The Westmoreland Museum of Art

A new exhibition at The Westmoreland Museum of Art explores the effects of colonialism in America while highlighting the experiences of Native Americans. The museum is offering performances, discussions and culinary experiences as part of the collection, which is anchored by a photography exhibit called, "Mingled Visions: The Photographs of Edward S. Curtis and Will Wilson."

Leah Jonns / Courtesy of La'Tasha Mayes

Applications opened this month on the Social Justice Rapid Response Fund, a new program providing grants to help support activists in Pittsburgh. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

The 38th annual Pittsburgh Home and Garden Show kicks off Friday at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. John DeSantis, the event’s executive director, says that this year's 10-day event will have more than 1,800 vendors and include a farm-to-table, buy-local conference. 

Courtesy of the artist

Cartoonist Rob Rogers’s new book is titled “Enemy of the People: A Cartoonist’s Journey.” On its cover, a caricature of Rogers himself stands in a police lineup while holding a large mug shot of President Donald Trump.  

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

Since the summer of 2017, Pittsburghers stuck in traffic at the intersection of Bigelow Boulevard and Herron Avenue could be greeted by a billboard with the same smiling face, positive message and personal phone number. Its message belonged to poet Rachel Ann Bovier. 

Charles Sykes / Invision/AP

Cartoonist and writer Alison Bechdel started writing when she was just a child with a diary. But even then, she was preoccupied with issues that would define the lesbian experience.

Art by Ginger Brooks Takahashi

Being whom you want to be is one thing. Having others see you that way is another.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 

Officials, community leaders and advocates gathered downtown Monday to renew a commitment to protecting human rights on the 70th anniversary of Human Rights Day. But what does that commitment mean in a practical sense?

Pennsylvania Department of Transportation

There are thousands of bridges big and small in Pennsylvania, and many are in need of replacement or repairs. 

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

 

The U.S. Supreme Court could soon make the process by which states confiscate property used in a crime, even if it was used tangentially, much more difficult for states like Pennsylvania. Some state civil asset forfeiture laws allow police to take cash, cars or real estate, even without proof of a crime.

University of Pittsburgh School of Law

 

People in the justice system often rely on law libraries for information, especially if they can’t afford an attorney. Sometimes those situations are complicated by mental health challenges.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

From tree and light displays to baked goods, music and shopping, the holiday season brings with it scores of Yuletide traditions in Pittsburgh.

For 57 years, they've included the Carnegie Trees display in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Architecture. The museum's Women's Committee erects five colossal Colorado spruce trees every winter, curatuting each to a unique theme. This year, members looked to Carnegie International artist Karen Kilimnik to set the tone.

Sarah Bader

 

Garfield art space BOOM Concepts has aligned itself with some of the city’s biggest cultural institutions and well-known artists, including Mac Miller and Jimmy Wopo.

Courtesy of Redbull Media

Technical rock climbing jumped on the U.S. scene as early as the late 1800s, but it took nearly a century before advances in ropes and climbing aids helped bring it into the mainstream. In recent years, sport climbing -- and sport climbing gyms -- have exploded in popularity, and starting in 2020, three climbing disciplines will be represented for the first time at the Olympic games.

Courtesy of Pittsburgh Public Theater

When the Pittsburgh Public Theater opens its fall season Sept. 27, it will mark the first assemblage in 19 years under a new artistic director.

Marya Sea Kaminski, who served as associate assistant director at the Seattle Repertory Theater for four years, will direct an adaption of Jane Austen's classic "Pride and Prejudice" as her inagural show. It's the first in a season with women at the forefront, including a reworking of Shakespeare's "The Tempest."

Carnegie Mellon University

A team of computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University has developed a technology that makes run-of-the-mill paper move on its own.

The paper is cut into a shape, such as a flower, and treated with a thin conductor that's either applied by a 3-D printer or painted on. It adds only a half millimeter of thickness. The paper is then folded or bent into a shape and heated in an oven.

At that point, an electrical current, heat, or touch will cause the paper to uncurl; when the stimulus is removed, the paper goes back to its natural curled state.

Courtesy of Pittsburgh Public Schools

 

From the beginning, Pittsburgh Public Schools' Superintendent Anthony Hamlet says it's been his goal to improve students' mental health, address racial disparities and close the district's historically troubling achievement gaps. 

Among his 137-point strategic plan, Hamlet, who's responsible for 25,000 students across 54 schools, points to implementing restorative discipline, minimizing school suspensions and offering more time to staffers for collaborative learning and development.

Photo by Bill O'Driscoll / 90.5 WESA News

Many first-time visitors to Pittsburgh know of its history of steelmaking. A few are familiar with its legacy in jazz. But probably only Postcommodity would blend the two like the art collective is doing for the 2018 Carnegie International.

Photo by Anthony Bookhammer / Courtesy of Rivers of Steel Arts

Neglected for decades, in the past several years the Carrie Blast Furnaces, in Rankin, have been reborn.

Courtesy of the City of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh’s city parks might be popular, but they’ve got a lot of spaces that could be livelier – think of that blank concrete pedestrian underpass in Schenley Park, or the featureless reservoir jetty in Highland Park.

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

Bill Strickland stepped down July 1 from his role as the CEO of Manchester Bidwell Corporation 50 years after he founded the craftsmen’s guild.

Artist Reveals The Hidden Lives And Importance Of Amphibians

Jun 21, 2018
Courtesy of Ashley Cecil

Recently, Pittsburgh artist Ashley Cecil was in Frick Park, temporarily installing nine small, steel sculptures just outside the Frick Environmental Center.

Angela Washko

The aesthetic of “The Game: The Game” couples lurid fluorescents with hazy shadows to create the same disjointed feeling of standing in a loud, dark bar.

While the player's character is femme-presenting, the other avatars are all men. The goal of the game is to navigate a bar that's been infiltrated by a group of so-called "pick-up artists."

Photo courtesy of City Theatre

Most theater companies have an artistic director – the guiding force behind what goes on stage. But Pittsburgh’s City Theatre did without one for about a year following the resignation of Tracy Brigden, who’d held the post for 16 years.

Instead, the troupe, one of Pittsburgh’s largest and most venerable theater companies, made it through the 2017-18 season led by a team of three top administrators.

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