Bill

Senate OKs Bill To Toughen Gun Laws In Domestic Abuse Cases

Mar 21, 2018
Carolyn Kaster / AP

The Pennsylvania Senate is giving unanimous approval to a bill to force people with a domestic violence ruling against them to more quickly forfeit their firearms.

The Senate's 50-0 vote Wednesday sends the bill to the House. Domestic violence- and gun violence-prevention groups support the bill. It passed after changes negotiated by gun-rights groups.

Ryan Dickey / Flickr

A Pennsylvania lawmaker has introduced legislation that could have parents footing the bill if their child bullies another kid at school.

State Rep. Frank Burns' bill gives parents three strikes. The first time a child bullies someone, the school is required to inform his or her parents how the school handled the situation. Parents would have to take a class on bullying and attend a bullying resolution conference the second time. The third time, parents would receive a court citation and pay up to a $500 fine.

Matt Rourke / AP

Pennsylvania state representatives are moving closer to a vote that would let the public decide whether to trim about a quarter of their own members.

The state House on Monday turned down a series of proposed changes to the constitutional amendment.

Amendments at this stage could prevent the constitutional referendum from being put before the state's voters this year.

A final vote in the House and passage by the Senate are still required.

The referendum would cut the size of the state House of Representatives from 203 to 151 members.

Matt Rourke / AP

A bill narrowing the window to get an abortion in Pennsylvania could be on a fast track to Governor Tom Wolf’s desk sometime soon.

Rep. Tom Caltagirone Facebook Page

Representative Thomas Caltagirone, D-Berks, has sponsored a bill requiring mental health training for police and district judges. Under the current system, he claims that many people who should be treated in a mental health clinic are instead placed in jail because there is not enough room.

One solution he recommends is to use closed prisons for these potential patients and make them into mental health facilities.