Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon University

  

University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University researchers are developing emergency medicine technology for the U.S. military that uses artificial intelligence.

Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP

A tweak to smart watches to have them identify dozens of movements could change the face of health tracking apps, according to researchers at Carnegie Mellon University. 

Photo courtesy of Edda L. Fields-Black

Critics say the history of slavery in the U.S. is poorly understood. Even less well known is the complex story of the rice plantations of South Carolina and Georgia.

Those “low-country” plantations were a big source of wealth in early America. And according to Edda L. Fields-Black, a history professor at Carnegie Mellon University, the farming technology that grew the crops was largely developed in West Africa -- and then imported to the American South by captive Africans.

Carnegie Mellon University

On Friday, the U.S. Army activated its new Artificial Intelligence Task Force, which will have a hub at Carnegie Mellon University and develop military uses for artificial intelligence.

Military representatives who were at the ceremony said U.S. adversaries are already developing AI, and that collaborating with institutions like CMU is necessary to minimize American causalities.

Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science and Sony Corporation are collaborating to create robots that can prepare and deliver food.

Tony Dejak / AP

Peptidic natural products, or PNPs, are groupings of amino acids that can make for effective antibiotics like penicillin and vancomycin. These chemical compounds are produced by microbes to kill off competing organisms and can exist everywhere, including in soil and in the human body.

VarQuest, an algorithm created by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of California San Diego and Saint Petersburg State University in Russia, has given scientists a way to quickly identify previously undiscovered PNPs.

If you want to gain a couple thousand Twitter followers overnight, it’s not hard.

There are hundreds of websites promising more Twitter followers, LinkedIn connections, Facebook likes and even fake reviews for a product on Amazon or a business on Yelp.

These accounts, whether created by bots or real people, are called fraudsters, and social networks and other sites play a constant game of catch-up trying to identify and disable them.

As a new academic year begins today for many universities, a lot of students are attending their first ever college classes.

Various Pittsburgh universities reported either an increase in the number of freshmen this year or the number of applications they received - a continuation of a trend that began years ago.

Marc Harding, chief enrollment officer, said the University of Pittsburgh has about 3,900 freshmen starting this fall - about the same as last year - but that’s not because the same amount of people applied.

Platypus LLC / http://crw-cmu.blogspot.com/2014/03/hakuna-matata.html

Technology from Carnegie Mellon University Robotics Institute spin-off Platypus LLC has gone where no man has gone before. Small, autonomous airboats were sent to Kenya to monitor water quality in hippo pools on the hippo-heavy Mara River. Researchers want to know how the animals are affecting water quality, but they couldn’t get into the pools to collect samples.

The planned $201 million facility that will house Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business has received a major investment from a world-renowned venture capitalist.

James Swartz, an alumnus of the business school, and his wife, Susan, gifted $10 million to the university to help fund the David A. Tepper Quadrangle.  The Quadrangle, a 4.5-acre expansion of the university’s north campus, will include a 295,000 square-foot facility on Forbes Avenue that will be home to the business school, the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship and The Simon Initiative.

Highmark and CMU Look to 'Disrupt' Healthcare Industry

Jun 24, 2013

Highmark Inc. and its recently formed healthcare arm Allegheny Health Network are hoping Carnegie Mellon University will be able to dive into the systems’ terabytes of patient care and payment data to find industry changing breakthroughs. 

CMU’s Allen Russell will head the Disruptive Healthcare Technology Institute. He believes the healthcare industry, as a whole, has been resistant to what he calls “disruptive change,” like what the mobile phone did for communications or the personal computer did for mainframe computing.

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a way to track the locations of individuals in complex, indoor settings such as nursing homes.

Developers liken it to the Marauder’s Map featured in the Harry Potter books and movies, which allows Harry Potter to see anyone’s location at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

But instead of magic, this system uses a network of cameras and algorithms to track movement. Researchers said this could be important in keeping track of residents of nursing homes.

Prosopagnosia: When The Face Just Isn't Familiar

Jun 6, 2013
Bernard Farrell / Flickr

At one time or another you’ll see someone and say, “the face is familiar but I can’t remember the name.” For people with prosopagnosia, known as “face blindness,” the face isn’t familiar. Actor Brad Pitt, in a recent interview with Esquire magazine reported having the condition.  Dr. Marlene Behrmann of Carnegie-Mellon University is one of the leading researchers on this condition

Carnegie Mellon University has received its largest private foundation grant in the school’s history.

A $30 million grant provided by the Richard King Mellon Foundation will go toward a new institute to coordinate the university’s energy activities.

CMU President Jared Cohon said all seven colleges of the university are working on the topic of energy in some form. He said the grant will allow more collaboration between those colleges and their work.