The Confluence

Penguin Random House

On today's program: A food writer's new book follows one extraordinary chef around the world foraging for flavors; a local group is teaching families how to advocate for quality medical care; Allegheny County sees its first conviction of a 30-year-old crime; and citizens could be responsible for redrawing state legislative districts —if lawmakers are willing to give that up.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: A Pittsburgh leader is coordinating a national strategy for family caregivers; Allegheny County is seeing a Hepatitis A outbreak; a Duquesne University forum digs into the mind of a serial killer; and city council wants some control over how a potential new tax is spent. 

Bill O'Driscoll / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: DNA excavated from a nearby rockshelter could tell us about humanity 19,000 years ago; how the once-lost running buffalo clover has rebounded; why Pennsylvania is suing the family behind Purdue Pharma; and Pittsburgh ranks among the most sustainable for its building practices.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today's program: Two state legislators want to pass a bill to confront sexual harassment in state government; how the flu shot can strengthen herd immunity; a regulations loophole might be to blame for toxic landfill runoff; and the state plans to close the Polk Center for adults with intellectual disabilities. 

R. Alan Adams Photography

On today's program: Point Park teams up with a Mississippi newsroom to investigate lead in water; how the "felony murder" charge has given thousands life sentences, despite many having nothing to do with the homicide; and a year into a merger, how is Pittsburgh's early music organization keeping baroque alive?

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

On today's program: Pennsylvania farmers are seeing the impact of trade tariffs with China; a local project is spreading kindness with a needle and thread; the Wolf administration is commuting more life sentences; and a very common, very toxic chemical is contaminating water supplies.

Courtesy of The University of Pittsburgh

On today's program: Provost Ann Cudd says Pitt’s Pell match will make the school more competitive; Pittsburgh remembers Mac Miller one year after his death; local police want to diversify their ranks; an anthology of art that uniquely reflects Pittsburgh; and the Steelers start their regular season against New England. 

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Propel charter schools are prioritizing early learning benchmarks; fires in the Amazon rainforest are diminishing migratory bird habitats; a lot of Pittsburghers think they live in the Midwest; and local universities want to register more student voters ahead of the 2020 elections. 

Courtesy of ReelAbilities Pittsburgh

On today's program: Gov. Tom Wolf hopes his recent executive orders lead to chamber-debated legislation; a reform commission suggests creating a new team to redraw PA's congressional map in 2020; Pittsburgh's Shakespeare in the Park presents a brand new take on the story of Caesar; and a film festival spotlights the work and stories of people with different abilities. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

On today's program: How Pittsburgh's community gardens embody neighborhood flair; what it means to study osteopathic medicine; how the city's micromobility priorities are evolving; what the Allegheny Conference is considering to re-brand Pittsburgh; and why Allegheny County has few options to replace voting machines ahead of the 2020 election. 

Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures

On today's program: What it takes to find balance for Pittsburgh's reading and listening pleasure; how the Allegheny County Jail educates the minors in its charge; impeachment talks are dividing the activists who helped propel Conor Lamb to victory; a look at the opioid epidemic tracks with previous substance use plagues; and a starter list of Pittsburgh must-sees.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Black newspapers can weather shifts in community news; parents worry about a controversial herbicide being used on school property; some Tree of Life congregants disagree with a death penalty for Robert Bowers; the nation's largest Amish settlement is being encroached on by development; Amazon partners with the Pittsburgh Health Data Alliance; and NPR's David Greene hopes the Steelers can overcome a distraction-filled postseason. 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

On today's program: Parishoners call for change in the Pittsburgh Diocese; Lancaster is one of Pennsylvania’s fastest-growing counties, in part because of Amish population growth; local archaeologists find evidence of a community 8,000 years old; and RMU's price match program expands beyond the Pittsburgh area.

Richard Vogel / AP

On today's program: Bomb and shooting threats are up in schools nationwide, even in Pittsburgh; the Clean Air Council is taking the Clairton Coke Works to court; and a new program helps prepare African American leaders for future corporate success.

Courtesy of Vincentian Collaborative System

On today's program: Pittsburgh Public superintendent Anthony Hamlet looks ahead to a new semester; volunteers clean up illegal dumps in Allegheny County; panthers once ruled Pennsylvania; and a new program trades tech skills for free residency in a unique, intergenerational community.

Ross Mantle / BuzzFeed News

On today's program: Allegheny County is a hotbed for false insurance fraud claims; Pittsburgher David Greene sheds a tear for another lost Pirates season; the airport solicits local venders to be part of its new terminal build; and WESA's Chris Potter draws a fuzzy line between political rally and campaign stop.

Courtesy of the Pittsburgh Riverhounds

On today’s program: Soccer attendance is on the rise in Pittsburgh, likely thanks to the U.S. Women's team; PFAS chemicals were discovered near Pittsburgh International; a poet reckons with her multi-racial identity; and Shady Side Academy teens reflect on their student Emmy Award nomination. 

Ryan Loew / PublicSource

On today’s program: Pennsylvania's attorney general marks one year since the release of a grand jury report exposing widespread clergy abuse; how sidewalks form an overlooked part of Pittsburgh’s transportation network; a school security expert examines the effectiveness of current protections, and a panel weighs in on the harmful effects of active shooter drills in schools.

Mike Wereschagin / The Caucus

On today’s program: Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala has a vast surveillance camera system with the ability to recognize license plates, faces and more; drug testing strips could help prevent overdose deaths, but they're illegal in Pennsylvania; a UPMC symposium centers on transgender and non-binary health care needs; a tour of World War II aircraft comes to Butler; and a preview of Trump’s visit to Shell’s new Beaver County ethane cracker.

DA’s camera network spurs privacy concerns
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Carnegie Mellon University

On today's program: Social science and artificial intelligence are combining to fight disinformation on social media; how volunteerism creates community in the South Side; the Democratic ticket for the 18th Congressional district takes on gun control; and PWSA prepares to bring the Highland Park reservoir back online.

Jordan Strauss / Invision/AP

On today's program: Duquesne University is opening a new osteopathic medical school; questions remain about a lunchtime double stabbing downtown; Pittsburgher Ming-Na Wen is the latest Disney legend; and an artist-in-residence at PIT unveils work honoring what happens behind the scenes.  

FBI Pittsburgh

On today’s program: The FBI’s Pittsburgh charged dozens of people, including a few Pittsburghers, with child trafficking; how one man tried and failed to change energy in America; where cars donated to nonprofits actually end up; voting machines still need to be updated, but there's still not a plan for how to do that; and the black beer festival Fresh Fest doubles in size for its second annual showing.

VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System

On today's program: The federal Mission Act brings expanded health care options to Pittsburgh-area veterans; scientists get their feet wet in Pennsylvania bogs; a new bill could strengthen protections for horses; and a Pittsburgh city manager who sold himself a house for $2,500 faces the consequences.

Keith Srakocic / AP

On today’s program: State Republicans are gearing up for the fall session; Sen. Pat Toomey's background check proposal reemerged after recent shootings; PA school districts explain how they're using state security grants; Pitt’s Department of Geology and Environmental Sciences is trying to find green infrastructure solutions; and a few television stations in Pittsburgh are changing frequencies.

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: New technology could make scanning for neurological disorders easier; an East Liberty theater spotlights black stories; the Allegheny Land Trust wants to preserve the land where a country club used to be; the return of the federal death penalty could affect the man accused of killing 11 at Tree of Life; and PennDOT recognizes people who don't identify as male and female.

Amy Sisk / StateImpact Pennsylvania

On today's program: Red Whittaker explains his journey from childhood rocket-building to roving the moon; pregnant women could be at higher risk for mental illness if they live near a fracking site; former employees of a popular Wilkinsburg coffee shop have accused the owner of sexual harassment; and if Kraft-Heinz ditches the football stadium on the North Shore, who's next to plant their flag on Pittsburgh football? 

Courtesy of Point Park University

On today’s program: Point Park gets a new artistic director; the Allegheny Front fact-checks a Trump speech on the environment; a group of Pittsburgh high schoolers releases an album about their lived experiences; and YWCA champions the empowerment of girls and women during contentious times.

Courtesy of the Light of Life Rescue Mission

On today’s program: New leadership at Light of Life Rescue Mission wants to increase outreach efforts; why the Three Rivers Regatta was canceled; barring court intervention, Pennsylvania's general cash assistance program ends tonight; and a look back at small victories for Pittsburgh women and minorities 50 years ago.

Allegheny County Health Department

On today’s program: Pittsburgh's health outcomes are improving, but not for everyone; what a proposed merger between Pfizer and Canonsburg-based Mylan could mean for area jobs; a vulnerable butterfly species finds refuge in an unusual place; and a peek into Squonk Opera's latest public arts fest debut. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto says downtown crime is stable, but homelessness is on the rise; a Homewood artist quilts the history of her community; the Philadelphia Energy Solutions refinery is closing; a county program packs kids backpacks for the outdoors; and Port Authority won't cooperate with ICE agents. 

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