The Confluence

FBI Pittsburgh

On today’s program: The FBI’s Pittsburgh charged dozens of people, including a few Pittsburghers, with child trafficking; how one man tried and failed to change energy in America; where cars donated to nonprofits actually end up; voting machines still need to be updated, but there's still not a plan for how to do that; and the black beer festival Fresh Fest doubles in size for its second annual showing.

VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System

On today's program: The federal Mission Act brings expanded health care options to Pittsburgh-area veterans; scientists get their feet wet in Pennsylvania bogs; a new bill could strengthen protections for horses; and a Pittsburgh city manager who sold himself a house for $2,500 faces the consequences.

Keith Srakocic / AP

On today’s program: State Republicans are gearing up for the fall session; Sen. Pat Toomey's background check proposal reemerged after recent shootings; PA school districts explain how they're using state security grants; Pitt’s Department of Geology and Environmental Sciences is trying to find green infrastructure solutions; and a few television stations in Pittsburgh are changing frequencies.

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: New technology could make scanning for neurological disorders easier; an East Liberty theater spotlights black stories; the Allegheny Land Trust wants to preserve the land where a country club used to be; the return of the federal death penalty could affect the man accused of killing 11 at Tree of Life; and PennDOT recognizes people who don't identify as male and female.

Amy Sisk / StateImpact Pennsylvania

On today's program: Red Whittaker explains his journey from childhood rocket-building to roving the moon; pregnant women could be at higher risk for mental illness if they live near a fracking site; former employees of a popular Wilkinsburg coffee shop have accused the owner of sexual harassment; and if Kraft-Heinz ditches the football stadium on the North Shore, who's next to plant their flag on Pittsburgh football? 

Courtesy of Point Park University

On today’s program: Point Park gets a new artistic director; the Allegheny Front fact-checks a Trump speech on the environment; a group of Pittsburgh high schoolers releases an album about their lived experiences; and YWCA champions the empowerment of girls and women during contentious times.

Courtesy of the Light of Life Rescue Mission

On today’s program: New leadership at Light of Life Rescue Mission wants to increase outreach efforts; why the Three Rivers Regatta was canceled; barring court intervention, Pennsylvania's general cash assistance program ends tonight; and a look back at small victories for Pittsburgh women and minorities 50 years ago.

Allegheny County Health Department

On today’s program: Pittsburgh's health outcomes are improving, but not for everyone; what a proposed merger between Pfizer and Canonsburg-based Mylan could mean for area jobs; a vulnerable butterfly species finds refuge in an unusual place; and a peek into Squonk Opera's latest public arts fest debut. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto says downtown crime is stable, but homelessness is on the rise; a Homewood artist quilts the history of her community; the Philadelphia Energy Solutions refinery is closing; a county program packs kids backpacks for the outdoors; and Port Authority won't cooperate with ICE agents. 

RIchard Drew / AP

On today's program: A free dental clinic at PPG Paints Arena will serve more than 1,000 patients for free; how Sam DeMarco hopes to chart his course as Allegheny County GOP chair; get to know the first African-American woman to graduate from Pitt's engineering program; a peek into the future for autonomous vehicles in Pittsburgh; and what immigrants and allies can do following reports of ICE activity in Pittsburgh.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

On today’s program: The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership wants to study how downtown streets could be used in the future; a look back at Karen Hacker’s time at the Allegheny County Health Department; kids and adults with autism have a new place to relax at Pittsburgh International Airport; a fungus bugging cicadas has psychedelic properties; and how a federal proposal to change SNAP could affect Pennsylvanians.

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: Grounded works with community members to breathe life into abandoned lots; get to know Shawnee chieftess Nonhelema; changes in Pennsylvania Republican party leadership could impact its approach to the 2020 elections; and a conversation with holiday performers who celebrate Christmas all year round.

Courtesy of Lawrenceville United

On today’s program: A Pittsburgh journalist tells the stories of families wounded by the opioid crisis; a Hazelwood support group helps families of kids with autism; Pittsburgh prepares to honor slain Officer Calvin Hall; how Youngstown tracks health issues close to fracking sites; and a Lawrenceville nonprofit teaches residents about their housing rights.

Rodney Grubbs / NASA

On today’s program: Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy wants to cultivate a trust fund; citizen scientists are counting fireflies; formerly incarcerated residents confront redevelopment in Homewood; the Trump administration’s inaction on environmental issues could affect Lake Erie; a Penn State professor remembers witnessing the Apollo 11 launch; and a 1988 conversation with Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins.

Ebrahim Noroozi / AP

On today’s program: How an executive order regarding kidney disease is affecting Pittsburgh transplant programs; the dean of Pitt's School of Law and former SCOTUS clerk reflects on the legacy of Justice John Paul Stevens; what it takes to get formerly incarcerated men back to work in Homewood; Democratic state Sen. Jay Costa explains his next legislative priorities; and WESA remembers Allegheny County elections chief Mark Wolosik.

Courtesy of CemSites

On today's program: Medical marijuana will soon be used to treat anxiety, but not as a first resort; a local activist pushes shopping local during Amazon Prime Day; WESA explores the impact of crime and incarceration on Homewood; how a Perryopolis startup is modernizing cemetery management and commerce; and a new documentary weighs in on how humans interact with nature. 

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Phipps Conservatory keeps its plants in one of the world's most sustainable buildings; a local organization helps video game enthusiasts find community IRL; the legacy of redlining, segregation and the war on drugs in Homewood; and high school and college STEM students get an up-close look at research at UPMC Hillman Cancer Center. 

Marcus Charleston / 90.5 WESA

On today's program: Fallingwater joins the ranks of Machu Picchu and Notre Dame; fewer than 5% of this year's Pittsburgh police recruits are black; a reporter studying the Thwaites Glacier tracks how it's melting; and a new book looks to answer questions about the future of Judaism in Pittsburgh after the Tree of Life massacre. 

Matt Rourke / AP

 

On today’s program: A 30-year Pitt study finds depression symptoms are decreasing in Pittsburgh's youngest seniors; President Trump replaces the Clean Power Plan; a Penn Hills senior housing community is struggling with mold; operas composed by Mr. Rogers are set to premiere in Shadyside; and family members of mentally ill individuals refusing treatment are at a legal stand-still.

Michael Santiago / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On today’s program: The Post-Gazette explores the ways child poverty affects Western Pennsylvania communities; how Anthrocon and its larger furry community can help people with autism; and the latest from Harrisburg over plans to pay for new, more secure voting machines in time for 2020. 

Whiskey Rebellion Festival

On today’s program: How to celebrate the 225th anniversary of Western PA's whiskey rebellion; how much parking revenue has the city lost to bike lanes; a new building at Millersville University touts energy efficiency; a local musician creates space for fellow Brazilians to perform; and new state reforms aim to protect victims of campus sexual assault. 

University of Pittsburgh

On today’s program: Pitt's jazz studies program has a new leader with lots of big ideas; Larimer's African Healing Garden makes its home in an empty lot; Ohio residents are fighting companies over the fate of fracking waste; residents in Bucks and Montgomery counties are battling contamination in private wells; and the Voter Participation Center is campaigning to get more Pennsylvanians to vote.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On today’s program: The United Way of Southwestern PA gets new leadership; an improv comedy group helps people with Down Syndrome; Retire Your Unserviceable Old Glory honors torn, tattered or faded American flags; and everything you need to know about local politics headed into Independence Day. *The Confluence will return after the holiday on Monday, July 8.

Illustration by Christina Lee, text and data by Oliver Morrison / PublicSource

On today’s program: An update on the MRSA outbreak at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh; the director of physician services at Gateway Rehab discusses last year’s drop in fatal opioid overdoses; a deep dive on the pros and cons of ozone; and how low-wage jobs compound challenges for Pennsylvania workers.

UPMC Childrens’ MRSA Outbreak infects patients and staff 
(0:00 – 05:44)

Courtesty of P3R

On today’s program: A new look, leader and vision for the group behind Pittsburgh's marathon; Kitchen of Grace provides a place for teens to gain tools for future employment; landowners go up against energy companies in Ohio; questions in Harrisburg over a tax break for those who give scholarships to private schools; and the Supreme Court wraps up its term with a series of tight rulings.

Courtesy of The Heinz History Center

On today's program: A conversation with the oldest living African American olympic medalist and Pittsburgher Herb Douglas; the Pennsylvania Department of Health says there's no cancer cluster in Washington County, but questions about the rate of rare tumors there remain; Roger Humphries is bringing jazz music to Pittsburgh's rivers; and Pennsylvania could soon join a list of states in requiring paid family leave. 

Carnegie Mellon University

On today’s program: A conversation with a pioneer of the space art movement about the first museum on the moon; Pennsylvania rivers get a second life as recreation hubs; the commonwealth's clean slate law gives second chances; researchers at Magee-Womens Research Institute are developing a new mesh for pelvic prolapse; and a sneak peek of WYEP Summer Music Fest.

Matt Rourke / AP

On today’s program: Artworks by artists of color open in a new exhibition Saturday; Carnegie library workers take steps in unionize; and a debate between the ACLU of Pennsylvania and the Center for Victims about Marsy’s Law.  

Library of Congress

On today’s program: Voting access still has a long way to go, 100 years after PA ratified women's suffrage; Pennsylvanians spend big on the lottery; SETpoint provides self-defense training for people at risk of gender-based violence; fracking in Ohio brings money and complications; and Pittsburgh considers microtransit partnerships.

COURTESY OF ENDEMOL SHINE NORTH AMERICA

 

On today's program: The man accused of plotting to attack a church on the North Side is due in court; MasterChef contestant and Pittsburgher Michael Silverstein draws culinary inspiration from the Strip District; East Pittsburgh has undergone a number of changes in the year since the death of Antwon Rose; Why are a number of Pittsburgh's roads referred to as runs?; plus a look inside Pitt’s newest nationality room celebrating Philippine culture.

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