disability

Lawmakers Aim To Stop Closure Of 2 Institutions For Disabled

Jan 16, 2020
Carolyn Kaster / AP

A fight to block Gov. Tom Wolf from closing two state centers for the intellectually disabled produced a second large majority in Pennsylvania's Republican-controlled Legislature on Wednesday, even as Wolf vowed to continue a decades-old trend away from institutional care.

MATT ROURKE / AP

As baby boomers age, more Americans may find themselves caring for family members with disabilities.

A new research institute in Pittsburgh, called the National Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Family Support, will focus on the unique challenges of caregiving. The center is a joint effort of the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC.

Carnegie Mellon University

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Tokyo and Waseda University in Tokyo are developing a suitcase that helps visually impaired people navigate airports. 

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are hoping to help pedestrians with disabilities cross intersections more safely.

Their research project makes up the latest phase in the 5-year-old smart traffic signals initiative centered in East Liberty, where wait times for vehicles have been reduced by 40 percent.

In the first year of the project, researchers will focus on building an app that pedestrians could have on their smart phones.

The app would send personalized data about that individual’s movement patterns to a smart traffic signal at an intersection.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority faces significant organizational issues—crumbling infrastructure, lead issues, steep debt—but soaring rates of short-term disability are not one of them, said interim executive director Bob Weimar.

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

Teresa Martuccio, 36, has worked with adults with cognitive and developmental disabilities for more than a decade. For the last several years, she taught art at Community Living and Support Services, also known as CLASS, in Regent Square.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

Dominic “Mickey” Sgro leaned on the back of a highly adaptive, metallic pink bicycle shaking his head. His friend is bragging on him again.

Find Some Flow

Three years ago, when Ian Neumaier started to think about playing games as a way to bring people together, he had no idea what he was getting into.

“We didn’t have a full understanding of the environment and the systems at play,” said Neumaier who eventually founded the nonprofit Find Some Flow.

Abby Warhola
The Andy Warhol Museum

Photos and paintings at The Andy Warhol Museum are set up chronologically by decade, starting at the top.

From the seventh floor, School Programs Coordinator Leah Morelli explains, “This is the floor in which his early life starts and the story begins.”

But even without a human guide, all visitors -- including those with visual impairments -- will soon have a tool to let them know where they are and what’s around them in the space thanks to the organization’s first audio guide.

Flickr user SOZIALHELDEN

The Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law 25 years ago on Sunday.

The act was a major step toward full-scale accessibility for citizens with disabilities, but according to many, there are still substantial barriers in place.

Evolving Standards for Wheel Chairs and Accessibility Worldwide

Jan 16, 2015
Mark Grapengater / flickr

There are 70 million wheel chair users worldwide. Our guests Dr. Rory Cooper and Dr. Jon Pearlman are helping to create new standards for as many of them as possible.

The doctors are co-directors of Pitt’s School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, and this month they’re launching the International Society of Wheelchair Professionals and they discuss how their work will impact wheel chair users around the world.

“The whole goal of this society is to provide opportunities to everyone around the world who needs access to a wheelchair,” says Dr. Cooper, who uses a wheel chair for mobility.

Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA) said when it comes to honoring veterans, speeches and parades are nice, but effective government services are vital.

He’s calling on his fellow lawmakers to pass the 21st Century Veterans Benefits Delivery Act, introduced in March, which would modify guidelines concerning the fulfillment of disability claims.

According to Casey, the average wait time for a claim at the Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs Regional Office, or VARO, is 231 days. In Philadelphia, it’s 266 days, and the nationwide average is 240 days.