Donald Trump

Kimberly Paynter / WHYY

 

If Donald Trump's stunning win in Pennsylvania mean it's the season for wealthy outsiders in politics, that can only be good for Paul Addis.

Addis, 63, a former energy executive, is exploring a run for governor in the 2018 Republican primary, where the winner is likely to face incumbent Democrat, Tom Wolf.

State Sen. Scott Wagner, R-York, is a rich, solid-waste magnate who's already running, and there's talk of other self-funding hopefuls across the commonwealth.

Pamela Au / Bigstock, via WHYY

 

Birth certificates, U.S. passports, Social Security cards — these are just some of the official documents on which a trans person's gender or legal name might not match their identity.

Shawn DeVault of Easton, Pennsylvania, who uses the pronoun "they," said the election pushed them to finally change their legal name.

Satya Murthy / Flickr

It's Thursday. Mom's been chopping, whipping, beating ingredients for days, but you aren't technically allowed to eat any of it. You're hungry. Dad is hungry. You're splayed on the couch with your younger brother, who yawns into your shoulder over the cacophony from Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. The dog hasn't budged from his hours-long, not-so-silent protest in front of the oven. He knows there's food up there. He's not wrong. Fido is never wrong.

Why Trump Probably Can't Bring Back Coal (Or Kill Renewables, Either)

Nov 14, 2016
Steve Helber / AP

Donald Trump's shocking victory in the 2016 presidential election will have reverberations on many aspects of American life. But many say one of the most serious is what it will mean for energy and environmental issues.

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Two York County School of Technology High School students face disciplinary action after they carried a Donald Trump campaign sign while “white power” was chanted as they walked through the school’s halls Wednesday. 

Renie Mezzanotti, the school's communications and outreach coordinator, said the incident happened while students were walking into the school at the beginning of the day and administrators were quick to squash the issue.

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto met with the city’s public safety director, police chief and commander of special deployment Thursday to set a standard operating procedure for de-escalating public protests.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Unease, anger and a desire to take action motivated more than 300 people to gather at the Ace Hotel in East Liberty late Wednesday, prompting small group meetings, impromptu speakers and a protest curtailed by smoke bombs through nearby Shadyside.

Don't Cash In Your Retirement Just Because Trump Won

Nov 9, 2016
Richard Drew / AP

While stock markets initially dropped overnight after it became clear that Donald Trump had won the presidential election, they recovered throughout the day on Wednesday. Those fluctuations support the view of one Pittsburgh economist, who says we should take a “wait and see” approach to the economy.

Kimberly Paynter / WHYY

I've been hearing for weeks that if you drove through western and central Pennsylvania, you'd see Trump signs everywhere, like mushrooms.

How could the polls showing Hillary Clinton so far ahead in the state have been so wrong?

Trump, who happily ignored the conventional tools of political campaigns, just did it his way and won.

An early look at the numbers suggests it was Trump's ability to excite and expand his populist base that got the job done.

Trump Clinches Presidency In Major Upset

Nov 9, 2016
Charles Krupa / AP

 

President-elect Donald Trump says Hillary Clinton congratulated him on his victory.

Shortly before clinching the election, the Republican scored an important victory in the presidential battleground of Pennsylvania, capturing a state critical to Democrats' White House hopes.

Matt Slocum / AP

 

Republican Sen. Pat Toomey has narrowly defeated Democrat Katie McGinty.

History's most expensive Senate race concluded more than four hours after polls closed at 8 p.m. Tuesday with thousands still in line to cast their ballots.

Updated 10:28 a.m. ET

On Tuesday night, as the presidential election's outcome headed toward an unexpected Trump victory, stock futures plunged. Investors had bet heavily Monday on Democrat Hillary Clinton. As Republican Donald Trump picked up many more votes than polls had predicted, markets reacted violently to the change in expectations.

Matt Rourke / AP

Republican U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey says he has voted for GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, revealing his choice after saying for months that he hadn't been persuaded.

Toomey said after voting Tuesday night near his Allentown-area home that it was a tough call for him.

Hillary Clinton's path relies on winning traditionally Democratic states and has several potential ways over the top. Donald Trump has a much narrower path — he has to run the table in toss-up states and break through in a state that currently leans toward Clinton.

Here are seven ways Election Day could play out:

martinak15 / Flickr

For thousands of left-leaning men and women last week, Election Night was the culmination of a political nightmare they’d assumed would be over. 

AP

 

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump will spend the last day of the campaign in Pennsylvania.

Trump will hold a rally at 5:30 p.m. Monday at the Lackawanna College Student Union in Scranton. Clinton will stop at the University of Pittsburgh for a noon rally before traveling to a rally in Philadelphia Monday night.

Journalists' Perspectives On The 2016 Elections

Nov 4, 2016
Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

The Confluence – where the news comes together is 90.5 WESA’s weekly news program.

Each week reporters, editors and bloggers join veteran journalist, and host, Kevin Gavin. They’ll go behind the headlines taking an in-depth look at the stories important to the Pittsburgh region.

The Confluence broadcasts live from Point Park University’s Center for Media Innovation. As the 2016 election season winds down a panel of journalists join us to discuss the presidential and senate races. We’ll also examine how the media has covered the elections.

Matt Rourke / AP

 

A few weeks ago in Ambridge, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump wrapped up his speech with a request for Pennsylvanians to not just vote, but to monitor others.

“[It’s] so important that you watch other communities,” Trump said. “Because we don’t want this election stolen from us.”

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

Sage Arnold, 13, is not a big fan of this year’s election.

“When I was little I watched one of the debates between Obama and Mitt Romney,” he said. “I couldn’t really understand a lot of it, but it sounded really civilized and mature.”

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

When Barack Obama campaigned in 2008 and 2012, some credited his success, at least in part, to his use of Twitter.

This election, the short-length video platform Snapchat, first released in 2011, could help tip the scales for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump. 

Matt Rourke / AP

Republican Vice Presidential Candidate Mike Pence focused on three key issues at a rally in Westmoreland County on Tuesday: security at home and abroad, growing the economy and U.S. Supreme Court nominations.

The Indiana governor graced the Westmoreland Community College mid-afternoon amid crowds of more than 800 people chanting “lock her up” and “drain the swamp.”

Priory Fine Pastries / Facebook

People express their political support in many ways, be it yard signs, T-shirts or even by painting their homes.

One local bakery has provided another option: cookies.

Priory Fine Pastries unveiled sugar cookies Tuesday bearing printed images of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump priced at $1.25 each.

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

Dana Ash, 59, of Morningside has voted in every presidential election of the last 40 years. She said she considers herself an Independent and has voted for Republicans in congressional, state and local races, but never in presidential races. This year is no different.

Matt Rourke / AP

Former President Bill Clinton spoke to a group of about 200 supporters in Aliquippa, Pa. Friday morning, promising that his wife, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, would create tangible changes for communities he called “left out and left behind.”

“We can’t grow enough manufacturing jobs for everybody,” Clinton said. “We have to have the small business economy coming back and she’s the only person to do it.”

Imagine for a moment that it's Jan. 21, 2017. After a chilly inauguration the day before, the parades and festivities have ended. And the new president of the United States is ready for his or her first day of work.

"What follows is my 100-day action plan to make America great again," Donald Trump told supporters in Gettysburg, Pa., last weekend. "First I will announce my intention to totally renegotiate NAFTA, one of the worst deals our country has ever made."

Donald Trump's star dimmed a bit on Wednesday. Actually, it was smashed. An early morning vandal dressed as a Los Angeles city construction worker used a pickax and sledgehammer to destroy Trump's sidewalk star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

It has become a familiar story in a world bristling with live mics. A public figure is caught out using a vulgarity, and the media have to decide how to report the remark. Web media tend to be explicit, but the traditional media are more circumspect.

From the outset, Democrats needed a very big-wave election to get to the 30 seats they need to win back control of the House. Then, a video of Donald Trump surfaced showing the GOP nominee making lewd comments, and later multiple women accused him of groping them. That left some wondering if these scandals could trigger that wave.

But that simply hasn't happened.

(L-R) Sara D. Davis, Alex Wong / Getty Images, via NPR

 

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is heading to Pennsylvania for campaign stops on both ends of the state.

He's holding two rallies Friday — at 4 p.m. at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown, and at 7:30 p.m. at the Newtown Athletic Club outside Philadelphia.

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