e-waste

Keith Srakocic / AP

A drop-off site for hard-to-recycle electronics and hazardous waste opens Wednesday in the Strip District. The city of Pittsburgh initiative will be located at 3001 Railroad Street near the 31st Street Bridge.

Allyson Ruggieri / 90.5 WESA

Allegheny County Council has given preliminary approval to a waste management plan that will serve the county through 2028. This is a regular 10-year update of the plan, but this time around recycling is taking center stage.

Geert Vanden Wijngaert / AP

At the end of last year, the City of Pittsburgh announced that a hazardous and electronic waste recycling program would start for residents in January. But four months later, the program still hasn't begun.

Beer_Powered / Flickr

Pittsburgh City Councilman Dan Gilman has listed expansion of the city’s recycling program among his priorities for 2018. (Update: Mayor Bill Peduto announced Tuesday that Gilman would leave his city council post in January to take over as Peduto's chief of staff.)

whatleydude / flickr

Recycling electronic devices remains unpopular despite the passage of legislation meant to streamline the process, according to new research.

Pennsylvania’s Covered Device Recycling Act was passed in 2010 and prevented residents from discarding certain electronics, such as televisions, with normal garbage.

Changing The Way Pennsylvania Recycles E-Waste

Mar 3, 2016
Ruocaled / flickr

Since its passage in 2010, the Covered Device Recycling Act has worked to keep electronics, including TVs and computers, out of landfills.  As the Act nears final implementation stages, however, it’s become increasingly difficult for Pennsylvanians to find organizations that will take their e-waste at an affordable cost. Justin Stockdale, Regional Director of the Pennsylvania Resource Council, says the CDRA is creating problems for his organization’s annual “Hard-to-Recycle” event. He’ll join us live along with Representative Chris Ross of Chester County, one of the original sponsors of CDRA, who is collaborating with other lawmakers to find a solution.

Donna Mazza-PA Resource Council / Flickr

This January saw the implementation of a ban on curbside pickups of electronic waste such as television sets, computer monitors and laptops.

The statewide ban, passed in 2010 as part of the Covered Device Recycling Act, called for all E-Waste to be taken to approved recycling drop-off sites.The process was meant to be simple, but recent difficulties have proven that not to be the case.