extreme weather

Gene J. Puskar / AP

It’s going to be really hot in Pittsburgh this weekend. Beginning Friday temperatures will rise, making it feel like upwards of 100 degrees, and state officials are warning of an increased risk of heat-related illnesses, such as heatstroke

Niven Sabherwal / 90.5 WESA

The National Weather Service confirmed that an EF1 tornado with winds up to 105 mph touched down in Butler and Armstrong counties Sunday.

Jacqueline Larma / AP

Five days of relentless downpours have left central Pennsylvania a soggy mess, closing roads and businesses, sending creeks and streams spilling over their banks and requiring rescues and evacuations.

Firefighters helped people escape their flooded neighborhood near Hershey on Wednesday morning, and search crews have not been able to find a woman swept away Monday night while crossing the rain-swollen Conewago Creek near Elizabethtown.

Jimmy May / AP

National Weather Service investigators confirm that a second tornado touched down Wednesday evening in Pennsylvania.

Sarah Boden / 90.5 WESA

In Spring Hill, early 20th Century houses look out over cinematic views of downtown Pittsburgh. The front of 36-year-old resident Randal Miller’s home appears fine, but the back is a mess. Part of it was slammed by a landslide this February.

“The door broke in the first day,” he said. “It didn’t break in in a way that like you could move it, cause there’s like trees sticking through.”

Miller’s laundry room sustained the worst of the damage. Reddish mud and glass cake the floor and everything smell likes mildew.

Wayne Parry / AP

Across Pennsylvania, four in 10 registered voters say they have personally experienced problems related to climate change, according to a recent poll from StateImpact Pennsylvania and Franklin & Marshall College.

Daveynin / flickr

Authorities have released the names of two men killed during a storm that weather officials have confirmed spawned a tornado in Pennsylvania.

David J. Phillip / AP

Experts say flat topography, impermeable clay-based soil and building on a low lying coastal plain all contributed to the significant flooding issues in Houston over the past month.

Samuel Brody, professor of Marine Studies at Texas A&M-Galveston, said the city’s rapid expansion and development had a role in making it difficult for water to subside.

“On top of that, [our population is] 6-plus million people and with that, all the roads, rooftops, parking lots, which is pavement, concrete and no water can absorb into the soil,” Brody said.

Can We Talk About Climate Change Now?

Sep 21, 2017
Gerald Herbert / AP

First Hurricane Harvey inundated Houston, then Irma unleashed savage winds on the Caribbean and parts of Florida. And then the fires – exacerbated by a severe drought – raging in the Pacific Northwest, choking the skies of Big Sky country. All of these events have links to climate change, scientists say.