Fracking Pennsylvania

Scott Detrow / StateImpact Pennsylvania

A new study finds that pregnant women living near hydraulic fracking activity in Pennsylvania are more likely to develop depression and anxiety.

“These are vulnerable women who are growing another human being inside of them," said Joan A. Casey, the study's lead author and an environmental health scientist at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

Casey and her colleagues conducted the study with 7,715 research volunteers; all were expectant mothers within the Geisinger Health System, which serves much of central Pennsylvania.

Amy Sisk / 90.5 WESA

A group of parents from the Fox Chapel School District is concerned about how their children’s health will be affected by hydraulic fracturing in the area. 

Keith Srakocic / AP Photo

New insight into a series of fracking-related earthquakes in Eastern Ohio shows that deeper drilling is tied to stronger seismic activity. 

On Health Effects, Blame The Trucks, Not The Fracking?

Jul 28, 2017
Matthew Warner / Flickr

Mike McCawley has studied the health effects of welding fumes, coal dust, and the volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens.

When he started to studying the potential health effects of fracking a few years ago, he began hearing stories from residents and medical professionals in fracking areas of children getting asthma and an increase in cardiovascular disease.

Is Fracking An Environmental Justice Issue?

Jul 26, 2017
Reid Frazier / Allegheny Front

Kirk Jalbert started thinking about fracking and environmental justice last year.

Natural Gas Industry Wastewater Pollution May Linger For Years

Jul 21, 2017
Scott Detrow / StateImpact Pennsylvania

A new study finds the treated wastewater from Pennsylvania’s natural gas industry may pollute rivers, lakes, streams and creeks for longer than previously thought.