hazardous waste

Geert Vanden Wijngaert / AP

Pittsburgh is moving forward with a contract to offer electronic and hazardous waste disposal for residents.

Beer_Powered / Flickr

Pittsburgh City Councilman Dan Gilman has listed expansion of the city’s recycling program among his priorities for 2018. (Update: Mayor Bill Peduto announced Tuesday that Gilman would leave his city council post in January to take over as Peduto's chief of staff.)

Melinda Roeder / 90.5 WESA

Managers at the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Station got some advice this year from a panel of unlikely consultants – high school students.

Blackhawk High School students studied federal regulations for problems like workers' exposure to dangerous gases and the disposal of radioactive waste. Nuclear engineers and scientists from First Energy Corporation challenged the teens to produce energy safely and more efficiently.

Courtesy Photo/ Pennsylvania Resources Center

More than 1,500 Allegheny County residents are expected to drive to North Park next Saturday, not bearing bicycles or picnic baskets, but instead — hazardous waste.

The Pennsylvania Resources Council is beginning its 13th year of household chemical collections with a drive-through waste drop off in North Park from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 2.

People are encouraged to bring any leftover paint, bleach, furniture polish, gasoline, glue, cleaners, car waxes, and even fingernail polish they have in their homes or garages to the park, where trained disposal crews will haul the chemicals away for treatment and disposal.

The Department of Environmental Protection is moving forward with a plan to clean up the Kuhn’s landfill in Darlington Township, Beaver County.

The landfill was used to dump municipal and industrial waste from 1964 until 1980 when the DEP shut it down on legal grounds. After that the DEP placed a ground cap over the site to keep various hazardous material contained. Since then other more potentially dangerous threats have kept the attention and funding of the DEP — until now.

Abandoned Eyesores Get a Second Chance

Jun 3, 2014

Abandoned buildings often deteriorate into community eyesores and remain untouched health hazards for decades. However, a new grant awarded to Beaver and Lawrence Counties from the EPA will be used to get abandoned sites on the path towards being redeveloped.

Beaver County received $600,000 and Lawrence County, $400,000 in federal “brownfields” grant money, which will pay for inspections and health risk assessments on derelict properties.