historic preservation

Jared Murphy / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Newsroom employees at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette vote to walk out after three and a half years of negotiations failed to produce a new contract; groups in Pittsburgh and across the country work to preserve historic sites significant to communities of color; and amid the pandemic, some museums worry about their futures. 

Carolyn Kaster / AP

 


On today's program: A new rule from the Trump administration could put homeless transgender people at greater risk; the Historic Review Commission considers six sites in Pittsburgh for historic designation; and some COVID-19 patients’s symptoms last beyond the expected two week range.

Jared Murphy / 90.5 WESA

The August Wilson House has been awarded a federal grant of nearly $500,000 toward restoration of the famed, Pittsburgh-born playwright’s boyhood home in the Hill District.

Officials say the funds will allow construction to begin on the 1840s brick house on Bedford Avenue, where Wilson, his mother and six siblings lived in the 1940s and ’50s. The $499,628 grant, administered by project partner Duquesne University, complements $5 million raised last year by a group of celebrities organized by actor Denzel Washington, among the nation’s most prominent Wilson admirers.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

From establishing historic districts to offering developers incentives to protect old buildings, Pennsylvania communities have a host of options to preserve their historic structures.

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The development company expected to demolish a historic Lawrenceville church has canceled its plans, according to the Pittsburgh Business Times. The paper reported on Friday afternoon that E Properties and Development will remove the demolition notice from Holy Family Church on 43rd Street.

*This post was updated on Friday, June 15, 2018 at 6:36 p.m.

 

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

An $800,000 conservation project is underway to keep one of Pittsburgh's oldest and most recognizable East End homes from sinking.

Midnightdreary / Wikimedia Commons

The Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Office is undertaking a study of buildings and spaces that are significant to African American history in the state.

Preservationists Praise State Tax Credit Program, But Hope For More

Sep 20, 2016
Ron Larson / Ace Hotel

 

Dozens of historic buildings in Pennsylvania — from an 1815 tavern in Erie to a Frank Furness church in Philly to an early 20th century YMCA in Pittsburgh — have been saved thanks to a tax credit program established by the commonwealth in 2012.

Natasha Khan / PublicSource

Through the dated kitchen and a hallway with a gaping hole, past the stacks of dusty Bibles and art history books, a grand staircase snakes through the old mansion. Cracked vases are strewn at the foot of the landing — at one time, the homeowner was a collector.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Preservation Pittsburgh is asking City Council to designate three natural springs as historic landmarks. Members are advocating for Howe Springs in Shadyside, Snyder (Catahecassa) Spring in Schenley Park and the Spring in Spring Hill (Voegtly Spring).

Joseph / flickr

For over a decade, the Young Preservationists Association of Pittsburgh (YPA), with help from the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation, has been highlighting the top ten preservation sites in the region.  Tonight, they will reveal this year’s list at the Union Project in East Liberty.

Matthew Craig, executive director of the YPA, and Katy Sawyer, chairman of the board of directors, gave Essential Pittsburgh listeners a preview of tonight’s grand reveal.

joseph a / Flickr

City Council on Wednesday gave preliminary approval to a proposal to nominate the Lawrenceville neighborhood for the National Register of Historic Places.

Councilwoman Deborah Gross said a national register status is different than historic designation through the city’s Historic Review Commission, because the former doesn’t restrict how property owners can maintain, update or renovate buildings within the district.

What does Pittsburgh have in common with Copenhagen, Hong Kong and Melbourne?

Each was selected as one of top 11 cities in the world “to live, work and play in” by Metropolis magazine for a particular livability feature: from walkability — Copenhagen, to culture — Hong Kong, to smart infrastructure — Melbourne.

The magazine, which deals with architecture and design, cited Toronto, Tokyo and Helsinki as the three most livable cities in the world overall. But Pittsburgh was honored for its advanced historic preservation.