National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

California is the first state to require solar panels on new homes. A state building standards commission approved the new rule Dec. 5. It takes effect in 2020. With a state as big as California, could this change affect the solar industry beyond state borders?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Today is the final day for comment for the Trump administration's public charge proposal that would make it harder for immigrants to qualify for citizenship if they’ve used public benefits, including SNAP, public housing and Medicaid. Immigrants who’ve received cash assistance or long-term medical care already have a strike against them when they apply for citizenship. What does this proposal mean for immigrants and the hospitals that treat them?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

A cost-public charge benefit analysis

5 hours ago

Why limiting which federal benefits undocumented immigrants receive could be disastrous for some hospitals. Former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn and the company have been officially charged of criminal wrongdoing. Plus, a look at catastrophe bonds in the wake of California's devastating wildfires.

From the BBC World Service… Former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn has been officially charged by Japanese prosecutors for under-reporting his income, but he denies any wrongdoing. And new figures from France’s central bank show the ongoing Yellow Vest demonstrations against higher fuel taxes are starting to hit the economy in real ways, leading the country's finance minister to call the situation an economic catastrophe.  Plus, have you ever been called the wrong name at work and just let it slide?

It's been almost six months since the Federal Communications Commission repealed net neutrality rules. Today is the deadline for the House of Representatives to overturn that decision, although no one expects that to happen. What has the repeal meant for ordinary people? Well, according to some researchers, it's meant wireless carriers potentially slowing down your video streams. Molly Wood talked with David Choffnes, assistant professor of computer and information science at Northeastern University.

It's been almost six months since the Federal Communications Commission repealed net neutrality rules. Today is the deadline for the House of Representatives to overturn that decision, although no one expects that to happen. But what has the repeal meant for ordinary people? Well, according to new research, it's meant wireless carriers potentially slowing down your video streams.

How your donation reaches people in need

Dec 7, 2018

After a devastating wildfire season in California, millions of dollars poured in for relief and rebuilding efforts. But how does that money actually get to people in need? We looked into it. But first, let's pull apart this morning's jobs report, which showed more part-time jobs. Is that a sign underemployment is on the rise? Plus: What you need to know about the big business of Art Basel.

The most destructive fire in California history all but wiped out Paradise, a town with a population of just over 26,000 people nestled in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains.

President Donald Trump said Friday he will nominate William Barr, the late President George H.W. Bush’s attorney general, to serve in the same role.

Trump made the announcement while departing the White House for a trip to Missouri. He called Barr “a terrific man” and “one of the most respected jurists in the country.”

“I think he will serve with great distinction,” Trump said.

On any given day, there are over 400,000 kids in foster care in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A little more than half will find homes. For kids and parents making that transition, the Bridge Meadows housing community in Portland, Oregon is experimenting with inter-generational living to help the new families work.

Unemployment is lower than at any time in nearly half a century. Lots of jobs have been added this quarter. But today's job report indicates that now more people are being laid off and filing for unemployment. As the labor market deals with tariffs and fluctuating financial markets, it's hard to predict what might happen next. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

No, really — slowing job growth is a good thing. Plus, a new inter-generational living program in Portland, Oregon brings foster families and seniors together through affordable housing.

A Hail-Mary bid to save Sears

Dec 7, 2018

Sears filed for bankruptcy in October, and it looked like the retailer was destined to go the way of the dodo. But on Thursday, Eddie Lampert, former CEO and current chairman of Sears, filed a plan with the Securities and Exchange Commission to save Sears. The bid relies mostly on new loans and debt swaps — forgiving some balances and assuming others. It would keep 500 stores open and retain 50,000 of the nearly 70,000 Sears employees. The deal still would still have to be approved by creditors and the bankruptcy judge.

The job numbers are in, and unemployment is still down. But how do find the best candidates when all the best candidates already have jobs? An investor makes a Hail Mary play to save erstwhile retail giant Sears. Plus, the arrest of Huawei's CFO has intensified the trade rivalry between the U.S. and China, but another fight over tiny components is getting bigger.

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed  and Selligent.

From the BBC World Service… OPEC is on day two of a meeting aimed at cutting the cartel’s production amid plunging global oil prices. With members struggling to agree, reports suggest some countries may receive exemptions in order to get a deal across the finish line before the weekend. Then, the Christian Democratic Union of Germany party will vote today on its next leader, who will be widely seen as chancellor in waiting as Angela Merkel prepares to exit politics when her term ends in 2021.

Earlier this week, Google's self-driving car spinoff, Waymo, launched a commercial self-driving taxi service in the Phoenix area. It's limited, but it’s technically a public launch, not just testing. And this is a case where the tech moved faster than the laws. Proposed federal rules for regulating self-driving cars called the AV START Act have been stuck in neutral for about a year. But this week senators updated the language in the bill.

Earlier this week, Google's self-driving car spinoff, Waymo, launched a commercial self-driving taxi service in the Phoenix area. It's limited, but it's technically a public launch, not just testing. And this is a case where the tech moved faster than the laws. Proposed federal rules for regulating self-driving cars called the AV START Act have been stuck in neutral for about a year. But this week senators updated the language in the bill. They're even considering attaching it to the must-pass budget legislation that Congress will decide on before the end of the year.

This morning, the ride-sharing company Lyft announced it has filed papers to go public. Word is that its IPO will happen sometime early next year.

NYC guarantees minimum wage for ride-share drivers

Dec 6, 2018

The New York City Council voted in August to give the Taxi and Limousine Commission the authority to determine a minimum wage for contract drivers for Uber and Lyft. The commission set the rate this week at $17.22 an hour, plus expenses for things like taxes and car maintenance. A statement from Uber said the new policy doesn't take into account the incentives and bonuses drivers get paid, and the move would mean higher fares for consumers. The wage will go into effect at the end of the month, and the city estimates the average driver will make about $10,000 more a year.

Small businesses struggle to find workers

Dec 6, 2018

Élan Flowers in Manhattan’s Soho neighborhood is a sea of roses and ribbon. Christine Hall, who owns the shop with her husband Patrick, says a good bouquet takes precise work.

“When I first learned how to do it I was, like, making the tissue all wrinkly and it didn’t look really pretty because like fighting with it and everything.”

5 things to know about electronics giant Huawei

Dec 6, 2018

An executive from the Chinese electronics giant Huawei Technologies faces extradition to the U.S. after getting arrested in Canada, further complicating U.S.-China trade tensions.

Meng Wanzhou — Huawei’s chief financial officer — has been accused of trying to evade U.S. trade sanctions on Iran.

But China’s government says that she hasn’t broken any U.S. or Canadian laws, and is demanding that Canada “immediately correct the mistake” and release her.

Monumental Lies

Dec 6, 2018

The Civil War ended more than 150 years ago, but the Confederacy didn't completely die with it. Monuments, shrines and museums are found throughout the South. We teamed up with The Investigative Fund to visit dozens of them and found that for devoted followers they inspire a disturbing – and distorted – view of history: Confederate generals as heroes. Slaves who were happy to work for them. That twisted history is also shared with schoolchildren on class trips. And you won't believe who's funding these site to keep them running. Plus, the story of New Mexico’s great monument controversy.

General Motors announced it will close plants in Maryland, Michigan, Ohio and a Toronto suburb called Oshawa. On today's show, we'll look at how the local economy there is trying to move past auto manufacturing. But first: everything you need to know about Huawei and the latest U.S.-China trade debacle. Plus: Will Lyft be the first ride-share company to go public?

Canadians have been assembling automobiles in Oshawa, Ontario, for more than a century. So when General Motors announced last week that it would lay off 15,000 employees in North America, closing plants in Maryland, Michigan, and Ohio, as well as in Oshawa, it came as a blow to the city's identity as a GM company town.

"At the peak," said John Henry, chairman of the regional government authority of Durham and former mayor of Oshawa, GM employment in Oshawa "would have been 30,000 jobs." His father and grandfather worked for General Motors.

When small was big

Dec 6, 2018

“The interesting thing about a penis in Greek art is not that some of them are small,” says Andrew Lear, a classics professor and art history tour guide, “but that they are all on the small side.”

It turns out, size did matter to the ancient Greeks, and smaller was better.

Andrew Lear takes Kurt Andersen on a tour through the Metropolitan Museum of Art to check out penises in ancient art — from the normal size to the teensy — to find out what size had to do with ancient notions of masculinity.

“It’s all symbolic,” Lear says.

Day Jobs: Respiratory therapist

Dec 6, 2018

Stacey Rose is a playwright in Saint Paul, Minnesota. But by day — and sometimes also by night — she’s a respiratory therapist.

Stacey is also a fellow with the Sundance Institute Theatre Lab. And her play, “The Danger: A Homage to Strange Fruit,” just played in Brooklyn.

As part of our Day Jobs series, Stacey told us about her two very different passions.


From Studio 360 ©2017 PRI 

'Human Intelligence': a holiday tale

Dec 6, 2018

Kurt Andersen’s version of a Christmas story doesn’t have your typical talking snowman or mistletoe. Instead, this holiday tale involves extraterrestrial surveillance and melting polar ice caps.

"Human Intelligence" was produced for radio by Jonathan Mitchell, and stars Melanie Hoopes, John Ottavino and Ed Herbstman. The unabridged version was published in "Stories: All New Tales," an anthology edited by Neil Gaiman and Al Sarrantonio.

(Originally aired December 24, 2010)


Kleiner Perkins, Khosla Ventures, Social Capital and Sherpa Capital are established venture capital firms founded or co-founded by immigrants. These firms — some considered legendary in Silicon Valley — continue to make profitable, often early, investments in tech companies that become household names worth billions of dollars.

As conflict continues in Yemen, getting aid to civilians is a challenge

Dec 6, 2018

In the midst of a devastating civil war, the people of Yemen are facing dire consequences, including the world’s worst hunger crisis, according to the Food Security Information Network. And the situation is only expected to get worse. According to Relief International, 22.7 million of the 27 million people in Yemen are reliant on humanitarian aid.

Pages