online privacy

Gerry Bloome / AP

On today’s program: A look at Pittsburgh’s primary elections; scientists seek a cure for a disease endangering Pennsylvania’s bat populations; online privacy on display through the Carnegie libraries; and the controversies and constitutionality of facial recognition technology.

Matt Rourke / AP

There are still lots of unresolved questions following reports earlier this month that data collection firm Cambridge Analytica improperly gained access to millions of Facebook users’ personal data.

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro said Monday from his Pittsburgh office that he and 36 fellow state attorneys general would address that doubt head on.

Christiaan Colen / Flickr

 Researchers at Carnegie Mellon and Stanford University have been given access to password “frequency” information of 70 million Yahoo! users in order to develop methods to make online accounts more secure.

Companies track how many users choose the same, or similar, passwords. Those figures are collected to determine password frequency.

A majority of Internet users admit they have taken steps to avoid surveillance by other people or organizations (including the government), and many believe current privacy laws do not go far enough in protecting online privacy.

The Pew Research Center and Carnegie Mellon University conducted a national survey to determine the level of desire among Internet users to be anonymous online, why and what problems they have encountered.

One of the findings is that 86 percent of Internet users have taken steps online to remove or mask their digital footprints.