Pennsylvania Innocence Project

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 

 Pittsburgh took the national stage after a gunman killed 11 Jews and injured six others in what prosecutors have dubbed a hate crime at the Tree of Life Congregation synagogue in Squirrel Hill.

Matthew Apgar / The Chronicle via AP

The exposure of wrongful convictions began in 1989, and it upended the idea that guilty verdicts were always trustworthy. When there’s a wrongful conviction, what has to happen to get a court to exonerate someone?

On this week’s episode of 90.5 WESA’s Criminal Injustice podcast, University of Pittsburgh law professor and show host David Harris talked to Marissa Boyers Bluestine, legal director for the Pennsylvania Innocence Project.

Simon Brass / flickr

In Allegheny County, eight people have been exonerated since 1990, sharing more than 125 years wrongfully imprisoned.  

Liz DeLosa, managing attorney of the new Pittsburgh chapter of the Pennsylvania Innocence Project, said most people aren’t aware of how the exonerated are treated in this state.