Performance Art

Photo by Seth Caplan

Some side-eye. A curt “gurrrl, please.” A sarcastically drawn-out “ohhh-kaay.” These are just a few manifestations of shade, that versatile conversational tool long used by African-American woman and gay men. Thanks in part to reality TV, shade has spread in the culture, and Rashaad Newsome has seen a disturbing outcome: White people who casually throw shade also stereotype black people who do the same as “ghetto.”

Photo by Alisa Garin / Courtesy of Carnegie Mellon University

Pittsburgh is familiar with unusual venues for music and performance art. Over the years, it’s seen art rock in a junkyard, and theater both on a river barge and in an empty swimming pool.

Subsurface was likely a milestone, though. The Carnegie Mellon University event last year was probably the first ever around here held in the labyrinth-like setting of a limestone mine.

NASA

Humans have had a greater impact on the Earth than any other species in history.

“I mean, you can see it from space,” said Steve Tonsor, director of science and research at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. “If you see images from space at night, you see all the lights of human activities. That is really a sign of our consuming fossil fuels and turning them into light energy. If you see the images from space during the day, you see the vast acreages of land that humans have manipulated.”

If you're walking through Times Square and you want to take a picture with a costumed character like, say the Naked Cowboy, just make sure he stays in his box. A big teal-colored rectangular box.

For years, street performers and costumed characters, like Elmo of Sesame Street, have delighted, and sometimes imposed themselves on, tourists and other passersby in New York City.

Whether your mom would prefer grilling outside with some brews or vintage shopping until she drops, there’s something to make every mom (or person) in Pittsburgh happy this Mother's Day weekend.

The Lawrenceville Blossom Tour, May 8 through 10, is a celebration of spring and local goods and services in Lawrenceville. Follow the Blossom Tour map and enjoy local artists, craft makers, and local shops. Each official tour stop will give out free local, sustainable seed packets to customers.

Pittsburgh Fringe Festival, an innovative performing arts festival, is a perfect event for artsy moms; and features a bounty of performances ranging from music to spoken word to puppetry and opera. May 8 – 10 in the North Side.

On Friday, Bayardstown Social Club opens for the season with an evening party kicking off at 6 PM. For $10, guests get access to this private space with fire pits and food trucks like Brassero Grill and Berlin Street Food. Guests can also BYOB and BYOM (Bring Your Own Meat!)   

On Sunday, the Neighborhood Flea at Pittsburgh Public Market will offer vintage, mod, handmade, food, and furniture products for sale. There is also a free yoga class, and a schedule of workshops great for crafty moms – for example, they can make their own perfume from natural oils, or make an herb planter.