Tax Credits

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

In an effort to keep more Pittsburgh college grads in the region, a state initiative is offering tax credits to startups to make wages more competitive.

Presidencia de la Republica Mexicana / flickr

The number of Pennsylvanians enrolled in insurance plans sold through the federal HealthCare.gov marketplace shrank slightly, as state officials accused the Trump administration of trying to undermine the system.

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

Days after negotiations to balance Pennsylvania’s late budget collapsed completely, lawmakers, the governor, and their staffers are still trading barbs over social media—and in more formal ways, too.

Nearly 80 House Republicans have signed a petition demanding Wolf issue approval letters to businesses for tax credits that go toward scholarships. The money is past-due under state law.

Both the Republicans and Democratic Wolf administration blame the problem on budget discord.

The Women's Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh

Once an automobile showroom, the building that houses the Women’s Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh will soon have a little more room to grow.

The organization serves approximately 6,000 women, children and families each year, but has run out of room to house them.

“We have been over capacity every night for a few years,” said Board Chair Sara Davis Buss. “In fact, in 2016, we turned away over 700 people who needed our services.”

Jim Orsini / Flickr

Smokestacks and glowing furnaces, emblems of heavy industry, once dotted Pittsburgh’s river banks. In recent years, though, projects backed by public-private investment have turned to making the Steel City’s riversides havens for recreation and leisure.

Now, some redevelopment boosters hope a new tax credit will encourage financiers to invest more in waterfronts throughout Pennsylvania.  

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

When the state budget passed earlier this month, a lot attention focused on whether there was enough revenue to pay for it.

But one part was largely overlooked—the more than $100 million it included in tax credits.

They are basically a tax refund given to certain taxpayers chosen by the state.

Marc Stier, director of the left-leaning Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, said the allocation is significant: the industries and companies that receive the breaks are the ones the state’s trying to bolster.