UPMC

UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh have found that pre-menopausal and post-menopausal breast cancer are very different in their genetic make-up but are being treated the same way.

Pitt researchers discovered this after analyzing clinical and genomic information on 140 patients previously treated for breast cancer.

It is the first test of a $100 million data warehouse project.

The goal of the data warehouse is to collect cancer data from UPMC’s 21 medical centers and analyze it in the hopes of creating personalized treatment.

Jelly Mark / Fightobesity.com

On Tuesday, the American Medical Association officially re-classified obesity as a disease. Experts are now saying this recognition will enable doctors to better treat the 1 in 3 Americans who struggle with obesity. It is hoped health plans will create more products to help patients manage their weight and broaden the coverage for those in need. Dr. Esa Davis, a practicing physician with UPMC, joins us to discuss the changes this re-classification will bring to the healthcare system. 

A few dozen union members, civil rights activists, elected officials and others gathered at Freedom Corner in the Hill District  Wednesday morning to protest UPMC’s use of the 14th Amendment in its lawsuit against the City of Pittsburgh.

The lawsuit says it is unconstitutional for the city to challenge its tax-exempt status because of its due process and equal protection under the law.

Pittsburgh City Councilman Daniel Lavelle said he felt shocked and bewildered at UPMC’s legal technique.

Pittsburgh City Council This Week

May 13, 2013
90.5 WESA / 90.5 WESA

    

Last week, Pittsburgh City Council gave preliminary approval to Councilman Ricky Burgess's bills to reform the police bureau's domestic violence response policies.  One bill pays for training under the "Maryland Domestic Violence Lethality Assessment Program," and the second bill changes the city code to reflect the new policies. A final vote comes Tuesday.

When receiving a 911 call regarding domestic violence, responders must ask the callers a series of questions to determine the risk of imminent harm to the victim. Afterward, the officers must offer to call a women's shelter to help the victim.

It is well known that uncontrolled bleeding can cause multiple organ failure and death.  It is also known that plasma reduces bleeding, so some are wondering if administering it early--while a patient is being transported to a hospital would lower mortality. 

That thought has prompted The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC to organize a four-year multi-center study of whether administering plasma to trauma victims on emergency helicopters will improve outcomes and save lives.

City Council News with Noah Brode

Apr 29, 2013
90.5 WESA / 90.5 WESA

WESA City Council reporter Noah Brode joins us for a weekly update on Pittsburgh City Council. The battle continues between the City of Pittsburgh and UPMC regarding its nonprofit status. The lawsuit was moved to federal court on April 19th. And last Friday UPMC motioned to have the lawsuit dismissed.  Also, we'll talk about the status of a proposed gunshot detection system in neighborhoods prone to violence.

Some patients prefer a certain type of doctor. Others don’t understand how to find their medical information via the internet.

Advances in medical technology, specifically in how medical information is given to patients, create a new medical disparity, especially for the elderly, according to Candi Castleberry-Singleton, the chief inclusion and diversity officer at UPMC.

Castleberry-Singleton, who spoke at the University of Pittsburgh today, doesn’t see new technology as a problem, but as an opportunity to be proactive. 

Pittsburgh Sues UPMC

Mar 20, 2013
Emily Farah / 90.5 WESA

Mayor Luke Ravenstahl has announced the city’s plans to file legal challenges to UPMC’s tax exemptions. We'll get reaction from Karen Shastri, Associate Professor of Business Administration at the Katz Graduate School of Business at the University of Pittsburgh.

Emily Farah / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl announced Wednesday the city will embark in a legal battle against the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's nonprofit status.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court developed a nonprofit test as a result of the case Hospital Utilization Project v. Commonwealth. An organization must act within the following five "HUP" test parameters in order to be considered a purely public charity:

1. Advances a charitable purpose
2. Donates or renders gratuitously a substantial portion of its services

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