Urban Forest

Photo by Chancelor Humphrey

Ashley Cecil has plenty of experience making art about plants and animals. Her resume includes artist residencies at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden. The mission statement on her web site reads, “nurturing love of nature through art.”

Andy Kubis / Allegheny Front

Lisa Ceoffe, forester for the City of Pittsburgh, says the health of the city’s tree population has improved since she assumed the position in the Department of Public Works a little more than 10 years ago. 

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

Pockets of bright pink will begin dotting river fronts and other open spaces in Pittsburgh over the next few weeks.

The Western Pennsylvania Conservancy will plant 400 Eastern redbud trees this spring, with another 800 to be planted by fall 2017.

The small tree with vibrant fuchsia flowers is native to the region and blooms early in the spring. Jeffrey Bergman, director of urban forestry programs at the conservancy, said those are two of the main reasons redbuds were chosen for this planting.

Pittsburgh's Urban Forest One of the Largest in the Country

Oct 3, 2014
Corey Cousins / Flickr

As the colors of autumn entice us to do some foliage watching, many people in Pittsburgh need look no further than their nearby neighborhoods.

According to the U.S. Forest Service and the University of Vermont Spatial Analysis Lab, 42 percent of Pittsburgh is covered by tree canopy. That’s more than green cities like Portland, Washington D.C., Austin and Philadelphia. Despite our reputation as an industrial town, Pittsburgh has one of the largest urban forests in the country. So how did these forests form? What is an urban forest and where can they be found?