visual art

Courtesy of ZYNKA Gallery

Jeff Jarzynka was in his 40s when his father was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer. Leaving his job and helping to care for his dad changed Jarzynka’s life in more ways than one. And the experience led him, ultimately, to open Pittsburgh’s newest commercial art gallery, one focused on showcasing local talent.

Courtesy of Associated Artists of Pittsburgh

Jurying an art exhibit usually means sifting through the submissions and choosing the best. For out-of-town jurors, that typically requires one visit to a single location. Juana Williams’ stint as juror for the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh’s 107th Annual Exhibition was a little more involved.

Williams is exhibitions curator at the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts, in Grand Rapids, Mich. She was recruited in early 2018 by AAP executive director Madeline Gent, who brought Williams to Pittsburgh twice to visit with artists around town and look at work.

Art by Douglas Cooper / Courtesy of University of Pittsburgh Press

If Douglas Cooper is a sort of superhero of Pittsburgh murals, he has an origin story to go with it.

Courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum

Andy Warhol is arguably the most influential artist since World War II. But Warhol was full of paradoxes – at once aggressively public and deeply private, and a serious artist who presented his life and art as all surface: the soup-can paintings, the candy-colored Marilyns, the glitzy Manhattan social scene. Beyond his towering status, there’s not much consensus about who Warhol, a man whose works have sold for $100 million or more, really was.

Pittsburgh Center for Arts & Media

There’s a good chance you’ve seen a sculpture by Dee Briggs, whom the Pittsburgh Center for Arts & Media has named its Artist of the Year.

Briggs is known nationally, but her large-scale abstract works in steel have also appeared locally, in settings including Phipps Conservatory. Her assembly of six thin plates of steel formed into interlocking, wave-like shapes graced Stanwix Plaza for a year, starting during the 2018 Three Rivers Arts Festival.

Bill O'Driscoll / 90.5 WESA

Blaine Siegel lives in Allison Park, but his family is mostly in Miami, so he’s a fairly frequent flier. Still, his thoughts about airports and air travel were greatly expanded after he became Pittsburgh International Airport’s first-ever artist in residence, in February 2018.

Dominque Jouxtel

The very first Three Rivers Arts Festival, as created by the Women’s Committee of the Carnegie Institute, took place in June 1960. It ran four days, and drew 28,000.

Photo courtesy of the Carnegie Museum of Art

The 57th Carnegie International ends March 25, so it’s time for a last look at the sprawling exhibit featuring cutting-edge work by 32 artists from around the world.

Three local arts leaders responded to a request to discuss one of their favorite works in the show.

Mark Perrott

Barbara Luderowski fell in love with Pittsburgh in the early 1970s, when most outsiders – and not a few locals – were having the opposite reaction. It was still an old mill town whose population was gradually leaking away.