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One Pittsburgh Doctor's Story About The Perils And Rewards Of Physician Training

Frances Southwick wanted to be a doctor for as long as she could remember.

As a kid, she collected old popsicle sticks to use as tongue depressors, volunteered in medical facilities and eventually ended up in medical school in West Virginia. Southwick did her residency at UPMC Shadyside including stints at a number of Pittsburgh hospitals.

Now she’s written a book called Prognosis Poor: One Doctor’s Personal Account of the Beauty and the Perils of Modern Medical Training, in which she talks about the stress and depression experienced by training physicians. She'd been warned about residency, she said, and thought she was prepared.

Southwick stopped by the 90.5 WESA studio to talk about her many labors of love.

The book will be available Oct. 10.

Larkin got her start in radio as a newsroom volunteer in 2006. She went on to work for 90.5 as a reporter, Weekend Edition host, and Morning Edition producer. In 2009 she became 90.5's All Things Considered host, and in 2017 she was named Managing Editor. She moderates and facilitates public panels and forums, and has won regional and statewide awards for her reporting, including stories on art, criminal justice, domestic violence, and breaking news. Her work has been featured across Pennsylvania and nationally on NPR.
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