© 2022 90.5 WESA
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Continued Rain Expected To Cause Flooding In Pittsburgh This Weekend

AP_18048012009346.jpg
Gene J. Puskar
/
AP
The Allegheny River overflows its banks, flooding Duquesne Boulevard in downtown Pittsburgh, Friday, Feb. 16, 2018.

A flood warning is in place in Pittsburgh through Sunday due to predicted heavy rainfall, and residents can expect the flooding to be similar to what happened last weekend.

Meteorologist Matthew Kramar of the National Weather Service said the water at the Point is expected to rise to 26 feet, due to a projected 3 to 4 inches of rain.

"Which is just shy of what happened this most recent flood," Kramar said. "But that's a somewhat conservative number and it could certainly get higher than that."

Kramar said the water will be high enough to flood both the 10th Street Bypass and the Parkway East "bathtub," both of which flooded last weekend, as well.

Pedestrians and motorists are advised to stay away from flooded spaces. Areas that are quick to flood can create hazardous -- and sometimes deadly -- situations. In 2011, four people were killed while driving on Washington Boulevard during a flash flood. The city has since installed warning signs and safety gates in that area. 

"It's never a good idea to enter flooded areas," Kramar said. "Even slow flowing water can sweep people off their feet."

The rain has also made it difficult for crews with the city's Department of Public Works to fill potholes

Kathleen J. Davis covers news about just about anything at WESA. She’s also the primary reporter and producer of WESA’s weekly series Pittsburgh Tech Report. Kathleen originally hails from the great state of Michigan, and is always available to talk about suburban Detroit and Coney Island diners. She lives in Bloomfield.
WESA invites you to participate in an audience survey. We’re interested in how you use WESA and what you think of our services. Your responses will help us shape what you hear and read from WESA in the year to come. This is an anonymous survey; it takes about seven minutes to complete and there are several opportunities to provide comments and suggestions. You can take the survey through Tuesday 12/6.