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Alleged Gunmen Charged In Chicago Mass Shooting

A family photo provided by the Rev. Corey Brooks shows 3-year-old Deonta Howard recovering from a gunshot wound Monday at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago.
AP
A family photo provided by the Rev. Corey Brooks shows 3-year-old Deonta Howard recovering from a gunshot wound Monday at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago.

Authorities have charged two more suspects in connection with last week's shooting in Chicago that wounded 13 people. Police believe that one of them, 22-year-old Tabari Young, was the one who severely wounded a toddler.

That brings to four the number of people charged in connection with the mass shooting Thursday at Cornell Square Park on the city's South Side. Police say it was gang-related.

The Chicago Tribune reports:

"Tabari Young and Brad Jett, both 22, are charged with attempted murder and aggravated battery with a firearm, authorities said. Both were arrested in an abandoned building three blocks from the shooting on Sunday night.

"Young 'was identified as the person who shot 3-year-old Deonta Howard and 12 other victims,' according to the arrest report. Jett 'was identified as [one] of the individuals who participated in the shooting,' the report said.' "

As we reported Monday, 3-year-old Deonta Howard is said to be recovering after surgery from a gunshot wound to the head.

The Tribune also notes that:

"On Monday, Bryon Champ, 21, and Kewane Gatewood, 20, both of Chicago, were also charged with attempted murder and aggravated battery with a firearm. Chicago police said the two 'played significant roles' in the shooting."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.
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