Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

More Protests In Ferguson Follow Police Chief's Video Apology

Lesley McSpadden and Michael Brown Sr., the parents of Michael Brown, at a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington earlier this week.
Gary Cameron
/
Reuters/Landov
Lesley McSpadden and Michael Brown Sr., the parents of Michael Brown, at a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington earlier this week.

Hours after Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson released a video apology to the family of Michael Brown, the unarmed 18-year-old fatally shot by a white police officer, clashes erupted briefly amid protests calling for Jackson's resignation.

They followed an exchange between Jackson and a group of demonstrators outside the Ferguson police station on Thursday. Jackson has said he plans to stay in his job "and see this through. This is mine, and I'm taking ownership of it."

St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel reports:

"Jackson tried to offer an apology — after having released a video apology earlier in the day — and to answer questions to protesters gathered outside of his headquarters last night. He promised changes — more training, fewer fines: 'We've gotta increase training and awareness. We've gotta get out in the community. We've gotta change the court system and the ticketing system. No, I'm serious, this is what's causing the mistrust, right?'

"His words seemed to do nothing to placate the crowd that called for his resignation."

St. Louis Public Radio has a complete report on the events here.

The Associated Press says:

"The police chief started to march with protesters around 11 p.m. Soon after, a scuffle broke out about 20 feet behind the chief and one protester was arrested. The [St. Louis] Post-Dispatch said at least three other protesters were arrested after another confrontation.

"The Ferguson Police Department spokesman didn't immediately return a call to The Associated Press early Friday."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.
To make informed decisions, the public must receive unbiased truth.

As Southwestern Pennsylvania’s only independent public radio news and information station, we give voice to provocative ideas that foster a vibrant, informed, diverse and caring community.

WESA is primarily funded by listener contributions. Your financial support comes with no strings attached. It is free from commercial or political influence…that’s what makes WESA a free vital community resource. Your support funds important local journalism by WESA and NPR national reporters.

You give what you can, and you get news you can trust.
Please give now to continue providing fact-based journalism — a monthly gift of just $5 or $10 makes a big difference.