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Obamas Welcome Trick-Or-Treaters, Dance To 'Thriller'

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama welcomed Washington-area children and children of military families to trick-or-treat at the White House Monday night. The outside was decorated in an Alice in Wonderland theme, complete with giant teacups and rabbits.

Performers rehearse on the South Lawn of the White House Monday.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP
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AP

The Obamas brought out their spooky side, dancing to "Thriller":

President Obama and the first lady Michelle Obama danced to Michael Jackson's "Thriller" as they welcomed children to the White House.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP
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AP

Here's the video:

There was baby Barack:

Tiny dinosaurs and pirates:

President Obama hands out treats Monday night.
White House Pool / Getty Images
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Getty Images

And performers:

Performers on the South Lawn of the White House on Monday.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP
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AP

Inside, some unwanted guests in the press briefing room (we knew Scott Horsley spent a lot of time in there but that much?):

"Journalists" Halloween decorations sit in the briefing room of the White House.
Yuri Gripas / AFP/Getty Images
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AFP/Getty Images

But no White House trick-or-treating story would be complete without a throwback to last year, when President Obama lost it over the baby Pope.

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President Obama greets a baby dressed as the Pope riding in a "Popemobile."
Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images
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AFP/Getty Images

Amita Kelly is a Washington editor, where she works across beats and platforms to edit election, politics and policy news and features stories.
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